BLU-RAY/DVD REVIEWS

003797Reviews & Counting
SEARCH BY TITLE # A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Night Train to Munich
DVD disk
06.25.2010 By: Mathew Plale
Night Train to Munich order
Director:
Carol Reed

Actors:
Margaret Lockwood
James Harcourt
Rex Harrison

Rating:
Movie:
Extras:
Overall:

star Printer-Friendly version
comment
WHAT'S IT ABOUT?
Nazis pursue a Czech scientist (Harcourt) and his daughter (Lockwood) through his home country, England, Germany and Switzerland.
IS IT A GOOD MOVIE?
In the year prior to World War II, Czech scientist Bomasch (James Harcourt), working for the Royal Navy on new plans for improved armour plating, flees his home country with his daughter after finding out the Nazis are hunting him.

Before she can escape to England, his daughter Anna (Margaret Lockwood), is captured and sent to a concentration camp where befriends a handsome man (Paul Henreid, credited as Paul von Hernried) who is, unbeknownst to her, a German spy hired to reunite Anna with her father and bring them both to the Nazis.

What ensues is an international chase--part comedy/part thriller--filled with false and assumed identities that casually begs comparison to Hitchcock, particularly 1938’s The Lady Vanishes. That may be unavoidable, as both Carol Reed’s Night Train to Munich and Hitchcock’s The Lady Vanishes were penned by Sidney Gilliat and Frank Launder (who provide the best touches in the film), give Margaret Lockwood top billing and feature little-known comic duo Charters and Caldicott (Naunton Wayne, Basil Radford) in supporting roles.

But director Reed is no Hitch (only Henri-Georges Clouzot could compare, really). After a brisk 85 minutes, the story winds up on the Swiss Alps with Bomasch, Anna and a British agent (Rex Harrison, great at tackling three identities) escaping Germany on cable cars and firing pistols at the enemy. The final moments, some shots of which are of obvious miniatures (also seen in the concentration camp sequence), lead to an abrupt and expected ending, the excitement failing to compare to a climax on Mount Rushmore or a nameless speeding train.
THE EXTRAS
Bruce Babington and Peter Evans (29:22): This video interview has the authors (of Launder and Gilliat and Carol Reed, respectively) discussing “the contributions of Night Train to Munich’s screenwriters and director, and the political climate and circumstances in which the film was made.”

Also included with this Criterion Collection DVD is a 12-page booklet featuring an essay titled “A Last Laugh” by film critic and historian Philip Kemp.
FINAL DIAGNOSIS
The Criterion Collection puts in little effort for Carol Reed's Night Train to Munich, a mildly enjoyable comic thriller set on the eve of World War II. While enthusiasts of the "train movie" subgenre may be interested, the lack of features and imperfect transfers make this release a rental at best.
Strikeback
Not registered? Sign-up!
Or

Best Selling

| March 2017 More Best Selling
  • 1
    Fantastic Beasts
  • 2
    Sing
  • 3
    Moana
  • 4
    Doctor Strange
  • 5
    Fifty Shades Darker

Featured Youtube Videos

Views and Counting