BLU-RAY/DVD REVIEWS

003542Reviews & Counting
SEARCH BY TITLE # A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
The Perks of Being a Wallflower
BLU-RAY disk
Feb 26, 2013 By: Mathew Plale
The Perks of Being a Wallflower order download
Director:
Stephen Chbosky

Actors:
Logan Lerman
Emma Watson
Ezra Miller

Rating:
Movie:
Extras:
Overall:

star Printer-Friendly version
comment
WHAT'S IT ABOUT?
Adapted from the popular book of the same name, The Perks of Being a Wallflower centers on Charlie (Lerman), Sam (Watson) and Patrick (Miller), a trio of social outcasts just trying to make it through high school.
IS IT A GOOD MOVIE?
Charlie (Logan Lerman, the Percy Jackson movies) is having the lousiest first day of high school ever. The upperclassmen call him a “toad,” the pretty girl next to him labels him a “faggot” and the only friend he’s made all day is his English teacher (Paul Rudd).

He’s already counting down the days until he’s out of there. That is, until he falls in with a couple of other misfits: Sam (Emma Watson), a senior, and her half-brother, Patrick (Ezra Miller, We Need to Talk About Kevin), who his classmates refer to as Nothing. They spend all of their time together, attending parties, driving around town, catching The Rocky Horror Picture Show midnight shows.

The Perks of Being a Wallflower is based on the 1999 book by Stephen Chbosky, who so felt the need to bring his story to the screen that he rewrote it as a screenplay and signed on as director. (That he couldn’t trust anyone else with his precious novel says volumes about Chbosky’s infatuation with himself and his work.)

That young adult book is, in essence, The Catcher in the Rye-lite, filled with the sort of angst that only social outcasts could understand. The problem with both the book and the movie adaptation is that it’s hard to believe many of the characters or their situations. Charlie, Sam, Patrick, and fellow wallflower Mary Elizabeth (Mae Whitman, Arrested Development) all come off, sooner or later, as composites, and they all, in the span of a school year, come across suicide, homosexuality, freshman hazing, underage drinking and drugging, domestic abuse, sexual abuse, and on and on.

Chbosky thinks he’s capturing the essence of high school, but he’s really just overdramatizing every element he could come up with. And the only ones he’s fooling are those on the brink of their freshman year.

THE EXTRAS
Audio commentary with writer/director Stephen Chbosky: Chbosky discusses his days as a film student and bringing his novel to the big screen.

Audio commentary with Stephen Chbosky, Logan Lerman, Ezra Miller, Johnny Simmons, Emma Watson, Mae Whitman, and Wilhelmi: Chbosky and his cast (who play Charlie, Patrick, Brad, Sam, Mary Elizabeth, and Alice, respectively) sit down for a crowded but still enjoyable track.

Best Summer Ever (5:00): This making-of featurette uses interviews, on-set footage and clips to illustrate the camaraderie between the leads during the shoot.

Deleted Scenes (23:11): There are 12 deleted/alternate scenes here, which can be viewed separately or as a whole, and are available with optional commentary by Chbosky. They are: “Alternate Opening (Hospital),” “Susan in the Cafeteria,” “Charlie’s Best Friend Michael,” “Best Milkshake Ever,” “After Secret Santa,” “Charlie and Mom on Christmas Eve,” “Brothers (Extended Version),” “New Year’s Day,” “Brother and Sister,” “Home for Dinner,” “Charlie and Mom Leave the Hospital,” “The Poem.”

Dailies (7:04): Also available with optional commentary by Chbosky, this short collection shows rough, unpolished versions of various scenes.

Theatrical Trailer

Also included are a Digital Copy and UltraViolet.

FINAL DIAGNOSIS
Despite efforts to capture the misfit’s high school experience genuinely, The Perks of Being a Wallflower is bloated with so many overdramatic elements (suicide, child abuse, etc.) that it comes off as (to steal a phrase from Holden Caulfield) phony. However, those that fell for Chbosky’s book will equally love his movie. Special features include two commentaries, a featurette and a dozen deleted scenes.
Strikeback
Not registered? Sign-up!
Or

3:42AM on 02/26/2013

disagree with the review of the movie

Chbosky ceates Charlie as a person who feels like an outcast because he has so many problems. As they book and movie go on, he realizes that other people have similar problems. Then theres is the relationship between him being viewed as innocent and naive clashing with their untreated problems. They look to him as an escape and Charlie learns to help himself by helping them.And the suicide and child abuse issues are shown as real side effects of much larger problems. My only problem is that
Chbosky ceates Charlie as a person who feels like an outcast because he has so many problems. As they book and movie go on, he realizes that other people have similar problems. Then theres is the relationship between him being viewed as innocent and naive clashing with their untreated problems. They look to him as an escape and Charlie learns to help himself by helping them.And the suicide and child abuse issues are shown as real side effects of much larger problems. My only problem is that Charlie is a Freshman and every other character is a senior. By the end of the book everyone goes off to college and he's left with no friends anymore. Anyway, i see what you were trying to say with this, but to each his own.
Your Reply:



9:37AM on 02/26/2013

Also disagree with your review.

Like Nowheredan136, I disagree with your review. I can kind of see your point about it seeming like this film has too much drama going on but I legitimately think it's probably not as far off from what you might see with a group of high schoolers in a year of schooling. With any story, you're bound to have some sense of overdramatization, but I don't think it was overdone in this film. The book is one of my favorites of all time for the simple reason that it DID capture what I felt was a
Like Nowheredan136, I disagree with your review. I can kind of see your point about it seeming like this film has too much drama going on but I legitimately think it's probably not as far off from what you might see with a group of high schoolers in a year of schooling. With any story, you're bound to have some sense of overdramatization, but I don't think it was overdone in this film. The book is one of my favorites of all time for the simple reason that it DID capture what I felt was a realistic view of life. I respect your opinion, but I think you were a bit unfair in giving it only a 2 for those reasons.
Your Reply:



10:31AM on 02/26/2013
I didn't disagree. I thought the film was overly dramatic and tried a bit too hard, as did the actors in their roles. Just not as charming as the book.
I didn't disagree. I thought the film was overly dramatic and tried a bit too hard, as did the actors in their roles. Just not as charming as the book.
Your Reply:



7:46PM on 02/26/2013

yesss

I watched this because of the review i read on this site. I caught it on someones top ten of 2012. the film was alot of garbage!!! He gets shoved once and im ment to believe he is bullied day after day. Utter trash!!!!
I watched this because of the review i read on this site. I caught it on someones top ten of 2012. the film was alot of garbage!!! He gets shoved once and im ment to believe he is bullied day after day. Utter trash!!!!
Your Reply:



11:41AM on 03/01/2013
I enjoyed this movie. The back-stories were in some instances perhaps more elaborate than they needed to be, but that's often the case with movies. That they downplayed the romantic aspects of the film in favor of friendship (until the very end) worked in its favor, as this isn't trying to be a John Hughes clone. As for some of the more absurd dramatic bits, well, in high school sometimes kids can blow things way out of proportion in their mind. We all experienced it a little differently, but I
I enjoyed this movie. The back-stories were in some instances perhaps more elaborate than they needed to be, but that's often the case with movies. That they downplayed the romantic aspects of the film in favor of friendship (until the very end) worked in its favor, as this isn't trying to be a John Hughes clone. As for some of the more absurd dramatic bits, well, in high school sometimes kids can blow things way out of proportion in their mind. We all experienced it a little differently, but I was surprised how well I could relate to it, as opposed to many (good) high school movies that tell a much simpler story than what I experienced.
Your Reply:



JoBlo's T-Shirt Shoppe | support our site... Wear Our Gear!