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MisoGenie 05-18-2011 07:24 AM

Snobbish Musician Thread
 
A place for all musicians to congregate and discuss what they are working on currently, their equipment, and their inspirations! This applies to Schmoes who belong to a band or any other musical organization, or just those who play an instrument!

I'll start by saying that I just bought an Ibanez grx20 back in February and am still enjoying it! The color's just great too. It has that comic-booky feel as if it would be a guitar played by some cliche hair metal band back in the 80's!

http://profile.ultimate-guitar.com/p...48_image_0.jpg

I'm looking for an electric keyboard as well, but that probably won't be coming my way until I'm at least done shooting the film I'm working on. Also, I've gotta say that most musicians in my area are complete egocentric deuchebags! I've been in and out of so many band-related projects that I've just about given up on even entertaining the idea. Anyone else have any better luck?

GoGoYubari 05-18-2011 02:10 PM

nice!!
I have an Alvarez AD60CK--her name is Ally (clever, right? ;))
and a Casio CDP100--its decent. =)

I don't do gigs anymore..
I feel too old for it..just not my thing.
I was never a "band" kinda girl..
I preferred to fly solo.

nowadays, I play for my own entertainment!
I have don't have as much time as I'd like to..
but currently..I'm dabbling with some Regina Spektor covers! =D
(specifically: Braille, Raindrops, Musicbox, & Fidelity)

MisoGenie 05-18-2011 07:35 PM

That's awesome, Gogo! (Love the name also!) I've never played a gig personally, either. As I've said, the bandfolk around my town are far too prude to accomplish writing an entire song let alone actually play a set-list somewhere. They're far too preoccupied being Metallica fanboys. (Metallica if good, no hate here, but if I wanted to listen to Metallica...I'd put Metallica on.) Have you ever recorded any songs? I'd love to hear some!

And yes, Ally is a cute name for an Alvarez. :p

Oh, oh, oh! I learned Jean Genie by David Bowie last night. Fun song. I feel pure class when I play it. :cool:

Criminal Rock 05-18-2011 08:42 PM

Oh C'mon, you can never be too old to rock a show unless you're in a band called Metallica.

My last big purchase was a used Ampeg SVT 810 from Guitar Center, and almost 6 months before that an Orange Bass Terror. I ended up shelling out no more than 1500 dollars for both, which is a motherfucking steal.

I really like the natural compression and tones of Orange gear.. my drummer owns a Tiny Terror and a 4 x 10 Orange Cab and it rocks hard. very similar to the quality of ACDC, especially when I jam the Les Paul! He also plays on a silver sparkle Ludwig Centennial, Giant Beats, a Big Ride, two massive 24" kickers with two DW 9000's. It's all American Maple so it sounds out with balls!

As for guitars we have two Gibson Les Pauls, a 94 Fender Strat Special Edition, Washburn RX10, and an Effector which is quite a nifty piece.. When it comes to basses we have a Fender Jazz, Fender P, Gibson, Ibanez and an electric/acoustic of some kind.

We should have more demos up by now but the recording unit we purchased for Christmas, for whatever reason, isn't compatible with our PC's hardware. Guess we'll have to wait till we can afford a mac.

http://www.facebook.com/criminalrock?sk=app_2405167945

vesaker 05-19-2011 08:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Criminal Rock (Post 3400300)
Oh C'mon, you can never be too old to rock a show unless you're in a band called Metallica.

BWAHAHAHAHA, too true.

It was in the latter years of high school i was introduced to music that was not played on the local radio nor on my mothers stereo, lol. Bands like Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, Yes, Tool and Rage Against the Machine. I can actually remember the exact moment, while listening to Basically (the bass solo between Behind the Wall of Sleep and N.I.B. on Black Sabbath's first album) when i said "i gotta learn how to do this, this shit is amazing!"

So luckily i had a friend who had a bass that he didn't play much anymore and was willing to lend me along with his little amp. I've taught myself how to play using Tabs and now have my own equipment for the past 10 years or so now. I pretty much just play for the fun of playing. Some songs can be quite a challenge and its gratifying to be able to play along. Never been or wanted to be in a band though i have played for fun with friends. Had this one who whenever he screwed up instead of stopping and picking up again he'd jsut play when he was but faster in an effort to catch up to me which would of course just through me right off, lol.

I have a Hamer Bass with Jazz pick ups (not sure of the model but it is almost 10 years old now) and atm i have a small Orange B52 'Orange Crush' bass amp. The only thing i don't like about the amp is that the patch cord and head phone jacks are made of plastic and not metal so they have broken over the years and i really need to take the amp in to get the patch cord jack fixed as it is getting quite crackily lately.

MisoGenie 05-19-2011 08:59 AM

I've got a Peavey Vypyr 15 Watt modelling amp. It's light-weight, but that's what I was looking for. (I live in a home with one person who works midnights and sleeps during the day and another who works first shift and is therefore sleeping all night, so I needed something that wouldn't blow the windows, but also wanted some variety.) I'm very pleased with it so far, although I'd really like to establish a small recording studio-esque room when I get a home of my own. Glad to see I'm not the only solo player on the Boards! :)

vesaker 05-19-2011 09:58 AM

Yeah it's always been my dream to have a home with some sort of sound proofed room so that i didn't have to worry about disturbing ppl. I've found that ppl are a little less tolerable of someone playing a bass loudly then a guitar since the bass reverberates a lot more.

heh, speaking of reverberation i recall that if i put my amp in the right spot and hit the A on the 5th fret in my dads garage it would make anything that was loose and metal rattle and shimmer, lol.

MisoGenie 05-19-2011 03:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by vesaker (Post 3400429)
Yeah it's always been my dream to have a home with some sort of sound proofed room so that i didn't have to worry about disturbing ppl. I've found that ppl are a little less tolerable of someone playing a bass loudly then a guitar since the bass reverberates a lot more.

heh, speaking of reverberation i recall that if i put my amp in the right spot and hit the A on the 5th fret in my dads garage it would make anything that was loose and metal rattle and shimmer, lol.

Basses' reverb is off the wall (as most of your father's tools were soon to be)! An ex-friend used to play bass while I was on guitar, and he'd have it on the lowest notch of the amp shaking bric-a-brac off of tables! If he put it up top-volume, it probably would have went down a lot like the beginning of Back to the Future! :eek:

KcMsterpce 05-20-2011 01:05 AM

I've been playing guitar for about 17 years, but for the last 12 years I don't play that often.

Used to be in bands when I was young, but I don't care for it too much. I play as a hobby, and being in bands is work. You play songs you don't like, have to play at times you don't feel like it, etc... not my thing.

I've owned at least 30 guitars in my life. Right now I have:
Fender Road Worn with a Warmoth neck, Texas Specials
Fender 52 Special Factory Run Telecaster w/thin-skin lacquer
Ibanez JS1000 (2001)
Ibanez JS1200 (2006)
Ibanez JEM

I am saving for a Gibson Les Paul Axcess, but it was October when I started saving and I keep spending that savings on other stuff instead.

One of my favorite tones is the sound of my Tele and/or Strat plugged into my Gibson Goldtone GA5 5-watt amp. Put the volume knob to "8" and it's the sweet spot! Punchy, thick and sexy blues tone!
I also like my TS808 pedal.

I played live a few weeks ago. Did SRV's Mary Had a Little Lamb, Crossfire and Tightrope.

I will start practicing FLYING IN A BLUE DREAM, LONG THING and ALWAYS WITH ME, ALWAYS WITH YOU for my next live performance. It will be a while, though.

The end.

MisoGenie 05-20-2011 07:30 AM

So, should I feel bad that I haven't screwed my whammy bar into my guitar yet, having owned it for nearly six months? I just don't really see the purpose of one, and don't care for them in general. Anybody else not buy into the hype, or am I really missing out on a cool feature of the guitar?

That's awesome you've played live, KcMsterpce! We have a local coffee shop around here where small-time bands or solo artists come and take the mic while the others dine and whine. I've always thought it would be cool to participate in something like that, however "hipster" it may sound. Oh, and I'd give you the infoz on the coffee shop, but it's really obscure and you've probably never heard of it. ;)

KcMsterpce 05-20-2011 10:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MisoGenie (Post 3400853)
So, should I feel bad that I haven't screwed my whammy bar into my guitar yet, having owned it for nearly six months? I just don't really see the purpose of one, and don't care for them in general. Anybody else not buy into the hype, or am I really missing out on a cool feature of the guitar?

Based on the picture of the guitar you got, it looks like you have a non-floating bridge. On a floating bridge - such as a Floyd Rose - the nut is screwed tight and the bridge itself is suspended - in tune - by the springs underneath the pickups. The tension of the strings in tune keep it "floating", with no contact on the guitar body itself.
Your bridge - like the synchronized tremolo on a Fender Stratocaster - is not this style of bridge.
In this case, your tremolo will have a limited amount of give and play before it starts to get out of tune. That kind of bridge - like on Fender Stratocasters - are best used with the tremolo to get a nice vibrato, but aren't intended to be used for super-violent divebombs and squeels.

There are ways of making that tremolo extremely stable. Go to the two minute mark of of this video for excellent tips on how to properly stretch your strings. Never mind for ways of making your kind of tremolo more reliable.

As for "missing out" on something... I rarely ever use my tremolo. It really depends on what you like to play. If you listen to Joe Satriani or Steve Vai you're be more likely to hear extreme tremolo use in a song than NOT hear it.
I would say almost all other styles of music don't use it extensively, and I would say "no", you're not really missing out on anything.
... but they can be fun to use, especially when just in the mood to make lots of noise!

A good example of YOUR GUITAR's style of tremolo use would be David Gilmour from Pink Floyd. Listen to any of his songs, but it's especially evident in tunes such as MOTHER, COMFORTABLY NUMB, LEARNING TO FLY, and well countless others... he actually cuts the bar itself to a smaller size so that he has more control over his vibrato. In any case, he's hardly putting much pressure on the tremolo and using it for violent outbursts of musical frenzy.

For an example on extreme tremolo use - typically requiring a floating bridge - check out ERUPTION by Van Halen, or several Joe Satriani songs such as SUMMER SONG, SATCH BOOGIE, or this video on whammy bar techniques.
Another good example is the extreme divebomb in the beginning of the major solo section on BAD HORSIE by Steve Vai, or the very end of TENDER SURRENDER where it sounds like everything is breaking apart and crashing, only to sound like a speeding up tape to reach the original note near the last 20 seconds of the song. These kinds of tricks can NOT be done properly on a Fender-style bridge. Unless you have it perfectly set up and the strings are wonderfully stretched.

MisoGenie 05-20-2011 07:44 PM

Wow! Thanks for the detailed read, didn't expect to see that in response to my little whammy inquiry! :)

I think I'll leave the tremolo out, for now, anyways. I'll definitely be sure to check into that video when/if I do finally decide otherwise (in fact, I'm watching the first now). I just don't think that screeching whammies are necessary for the sound I'm looking for. Speaking of my model of guitar, I'd like to bring notice to a site by the title of Musician's Friend. It's a cheap site for all band-related needs with great equipment, service, and reviews to make it convenient as one would hope. Oh, and if that's not enough, it has free shipping in America! That's where I got my Ibanez from, and where all of the fellow musicians in my area buy their gear.

www.musiciansfriend.com

Lost in Space 05-20-2011 10:53 PM

I'm a rapper, and all I need is once mic.

Yo, all I need is one mic, one beat, one stage
One nigga front, my face on the front page
Only if I had one gun, one girl and one crib
One God to show me how to do things his son did

nas

MisoGenie 05-21-2011 09:07 AM

/thread? :p

vesaker 05-24-2011 09:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MisoGenie (Post 3400853)
That's awesome you've played live, KcMsterpce! We have a local coffee shop around here where small-time bands or solo artists come and take the mic while the others dine and whine. I've always thought it would be cool to participate in something like that, however "hipster" it may sound. Oh, and I'd give you the infoz on the coffee shop, but it's really obscure and you've probably never heard of it. ;)

I've always wanted to find a place like this as well and i'm sure i could here in Toronto but i usually have enough other things going on that i don't bother. These days i only seem to play my bass when i'm doing my laundry at the parentals but since i do at least 2 loads a week that's 2 days a week i play for about an hour straight so its good practice.

I'd like to learn more songs but i never find the time for that as well. Being someone who plays from Tabs it can be tuff to find a tab for a more obscure song (especially on bass) or the solo won't be tabbed or it's just a poor tab all together.

If i could find someone i would pay them to tab out the bass for song i can't get one for jsut so i could finally learn how to play them......... and yes this is an offer to anyone on this forum that could do this for me :D;)

KcMsterpce 05-25-2011 12:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by vesaker (Post 3402449)
I'd like to learn more songs but i never find the time for that as well. Being someone who plays from Tabs it can be tuff to find a tab for a more obscure song (especially on bass) or the solo won't be tabbed or it's just a poor tab all together.

If i could find someone i would pay them to tab out the bass for song i can't get one for jsut so i could finally learn how to play them......... and yes this is an offer to anyone on this forum that could do this for me :D;)

Hm... Yes, time is a big factor in being good at music.
No matter how darned good someone is at an instrument, 50-85% of that is PRACTICE. The rest is natural talent. Professionals spend countless hours a week playing and honing their skills.

With that said, tab is a great tool but it can also be a crutch. I am not one to talk bad about tab since I am a tab whore myself.
However, I've spent many MANY hours in the past listening to a song and painstakingly learning it by ear. This is before internet was such a good source for stuff, too (1990s). I wrote my OWN tab to songs such as BLACK MAGIC WOMAN, WISH YOU WERE HERE, WAR PIGS, and others.
It takes a hell of a lot of time, but it's healthy in many ways:
- It teaches you how to listen to music and understand even instinctively how it's constructed much more easily than just reading tabs.
- The piece becomes much more personal to you.
- If you spend enough time and do it RIGHT, you also learn that song backwards and forwards and gets dedicated to muscle memory much better than just using tab.

Tablature is great, but even professional tabs aren't always right. Even if they're the same NOTES, some times the original artist plays it in a different part on the neck. Believe it or not, it can make a difference in the sound of the song if played on a different part of the guitar.

I would recommend you spend 2 hours getting a song down that you can't find tab for. See how much you discern from listening alone. Even write down that tab if you want. Come back later (the next day) and listen and play it again. Most likely there will be some changes to the first time you wrote it down because you have a fresh take on things.
I found that after doing my own tab on a handful of songs, other stuff came much more easily to me; either from learning it by ear, or even just another song tab'd out. I had a better grasp on what was going on with other songs.

The Postmaster General 05-25-2011 01:46 AM

I agree about tabs. Learning chords and progressions is also extremely helpful, especially if your a math-minded person, although you don't want to stick to formulas - it goes back to that maxim about needing to know the rules before you can break them. Even thought I know this is really a generalization, it often seems that most rock staples are really just specific scales, or chord progressions with a touch of rhythm.

vesaker 05-25-2011 09:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KcMsterpce (Post 3402749)
Hm... Yes, time is a big factor in being good at music.
No matter how darned good someone is at an instrument, 50-85% of that is PRACTICE. The rest is natural talent. Professionals spend countless hours a week playing and honing their skills.

With that said, tab is a great tool but it can also be a crutch. I am not one to talk bad about tab since I am a tab whore myself.
However, I've spent many MANY hours in the past listening to a song and painstakingly learning it by ear. This is before internet was such a good source for stuff, too (1990s). I wrote my OWN tab to songs such as BLACK MAGIC WOMAN, WISH YOU WERE HERE, WAR PIGS, and others.
It takes a hell of a lot of time, but it's healthy in many ways:
- It teaches you how to listen to music and understand even instinctively how it's constructed much more easily than just reading tabs.
- The piece becomes much more personal to you.
- If you spend enough time and do it RIGHT, you also learn that song backwards and forwards and gets dedicated to muscle memory much better than just using tab.

Tablature is great, but even professional tabs aren't always right. Even if they're the same NOTES, some times the original artist plays it in a different part on the neck. Believe it or not, it can make a difference in the sound of the song if played on a different part of the guitar.

I would recommend you spend 2 hours getting a song down that you can't find tab for. See how much you discern from listening alone. Even write down that tab if you want. Come back later (the next day) and listen and play it again. Most likely there will be some changes to the first time you wrote it down because you have a fresh take on things.
I found that after doing my own tab on a handful of songs, other stuff came much more easily to me; either from learning it by ear, or even just another song tab'd out. I had a better grasp on what was going on with other songs.

Yeah over the years i've always had to fill in blanks even on what seemed like well done tabs and i get better at it all the time.

I recall the tab for Electric Funeral being rather incomplete and the parts that were there weren't really correct either. I eventually learned to paly the song from the tab and listening for what was actually played at certain parts. In the end the tab was more of a starting point and that's more what they've become in recent years.

Timing was something that was tough to pick up at first but i've always played along with the songs so unless it's something particularily difficult i can pick up the right time after a couple of tries.

The practice is definately key. I can definitly pick up a new song a lot quicker these days then say 5 years ago but i always need that starting point which is where the tabs come in. I've tried to do songs by ear, recently i've been listening to a lot of Tragically Hip and some of the bass in their songs is great but i can never find tabs for stuff that wasn't singles. There was one song i tried, can't recall the name just now, but i just couldn't manage it. If i kept at it maybe i could but as it is i have a hard time finding time to just play let alone the task of learning by ear.

My dislexia and ADD don't help me either though they don't interfere much any more. When i first started i had to learn what to do with either hand separately. Practice it to the point i didn't really need to think about the motions so that i could then peice the two hands together and paly the song. It doesn't happen like that today when i learn a song (learned Hooker With a Penis most recently) but i still have some troubles.

One in particular is that if i move my left hand a good distance down the neck from some rason my right hand wants to do the same thing and its a concious effort to not have it do that sometimes, lol.

I've always wanted to go and get some lessons so that i could pick up key's and scales and the like but just never had the time or extra cash to get it done.

The Postmaster General 05-25-2011 12:26 PM

I remember having the same problem early on, and to help me delineate better control between the two hands, a drummer pal showed me some simple patterns to play between the left and right hand - just having one hand, for example, hitting quarter notes and the other doing whole or halves. It was really helpful because you can't carry a guitar everywhere, but you could always tap your hands on something and just make beats. I'd been cued into that since it's the same concept behind learning piano and I had seen that being taught. Something else that helped was just playing songs really, really slow - just enough to get the different motions on each hand and gradually increase speed, but that really applies to most aspects of learning to play.

KcMsterpce 05-26-2011 01:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Postmaster General (Post 3402931)
. Something else that helped was just playing songs really, really slow - just enough to get the different motions on each hand and gradually increase speed, but that really applies to most aspects of learning to play.

Yes. This is a BIG problem with a lot of people. There are "shredders" all over youtube - especially the younger people - who are playing fast, but it's sloppy as hell and they won't be getting any better at it.
They are sloppy because they don't spend enough time being painstakingly slow on a song and/or technique. They learn how to do the motion but don't care enough to slowly build up speed and play cleanly.

When I learn a song, my process is usually like this:

- Listen to it several times. First time listening, just take the song in as a whole. The second to fourth time(s) I'm trying to figure out the different parts that AREN'T guitar related. Not learning it, but feeling the flow of the song.
- After that, I pay attention to the guitar section and try to have a very good idea of what to do once I start practicing. If I have music and/or tabs, I follow along with the sheet music while listening to the guitar parts.

- Begin to play the song. Slowly. Not plugged it and with no effects.
- Once I have the notes and sections memorized, it's all about playing up to speed and STAYING CLEAN. This is especially important for me nowadays because I practice mostly Joe Satriani stuff these days. I don't spend enough time on it, so I don't ever learn new stuff. However, I don't cut corners and go with a "ballpark range" of proficiency. I'm basically re-learning music when I get into a guitar playing mood.

For example when I learned STAIRWAY TO HEAVEN (which I got down perfectly, unlike many who cut corners) and NOTHING ELSE MATTERS - which were the first two songs I learned from tab - it was a ridiculously slow process. I spent about an hour or two on the first two measures of STAIRWAY. Then when I had that down, I did the NEXT 5-10 seconds of the song. I played everything before that section each time as well. It took be about 20 hours in two days to get the first minute and a half of that song down. But I can play it even today without looking, even though I haven't tried more than a few times in the last 10 years to play it again.
Same thing with NOTHING ELSE MATTERS. I can play the rhythm section and sing it at the same time. Reason being, I did every section slowly until I got to speed.

This kind of process is maddeningly slow, but for me that worked best. I don't play BLACK MAGIC WOMAN anymore, but after an hour of brushing up, I can do it again just as good as ever because I learned it cleanly and correctly the first time around.

I hate watching these damned 8-14 year olds on youtube with a million hits because they are a girl or just young and people are say "wow! Awesome!" No it's not. It's sloppy and there's no excuse for that. Regardless of age. If I started playing when I was 4 and took lessons and spent time with it like I did when I started at 14 - with NO lessons - then I am sure I would be roughly 100x better than I am now.

Oh, and here's a cover I did a few years ago of BLACK MAGIC WOMAN, since I've been mentioning it so much:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PzB7FfTRLGQ&fmt=18

vesaker 05-26-2011 10:14 AM

Yeah i've found that playing slowly until you can get the actual movements and combination's down to then play them in the proper timing. Especially for some of the more complicated stuff i've tried to learn in the past couple years like Auqualung and Yours Is No Disgrace.

My biggest problem is that i have to always have to start from some sort of perceived 'beginning' for a riff. Like if the problem i'm having is say the 10th note in a certain riff i always have to start back at note 1 and can't say pick up at note 5 or 6 for some reason, my mind just can't seem to do it unfortunately. Perhaps if i had the time to practice more i could over come it.

The 2 biggest things i learned that have helped me learn new songs down the road is to find the most efficient way to place my hand on the neck to play any particular part. The way i place my hand for any note(s) is greatly influenced by what i have to play next and i need to be able to get to that next position easily and quickly. The other thing is just memorizing the note combination's to the point that i when i'm looking at the neck it's always at the NEXT note i need to play instead of what i am playing at that instant. It really helps me keep the flow of the song going in my mind.

I'd love to get a 5 string bass one day but that will be far off if at all. I recall looking into them a while back and noticing that the base price jump from 4 to 5 strings is something like $1500 and that's close to dbl what i payed for my actual 4 string, lol.

OH! And the Tragically Hip song i tried to learn by ear was Yawning or Snarling but i didn't do to well, heh.


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