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Old 04-15-2012, 11:19 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by adamjohnson View Post
And Brick is in that genre, jsut set in a different time.
Different time and different everything else. The only thing film noir about Brick is the dialogue between some of the characters. But Brick tries really hard to be film noir, but having a few kids look all morose and indifferent, talking like adults and solving mysteries doesn't make it film noir.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gilpesh View Post
Screams "IMHO". And Rian Johnson will never be more overrated than Richard Kelly.
You should imagine that scream on every post I write because that's what every post of mine is, IMHO. I just don't feel the need to write it because, you know, we're on a forum talking about movies. It's kinda obvious. RE Richard Kelly, nothing Johnson has done really came close to Donnie Darko.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveyJoeG View Post
I don't know, I think dialogue is something that can be stylized just as much as anything else in a movie. It obviously took you out of the movie, but for me, it was one of the aspects that made the film unique and tied the whole thing together. For me, the mise-en-scene can be much more important than plausibility and I really connected with Brick because of the stylish elements. What I feel can override what I think, and the opening scene of Brick always elicits a powerful emotional response from me.

I think I fell in love with the movie just from the opening shot, because of the music that was playing in the background. I got an immediate vibe of what the tone was going to be like, and the unusual choice of music sort of fit with how I like to describe the movie as a "beautiful contradiction." None of the characters are believable high school students, they are all way too old looking and sounding. But for me, all of these elements gelled and came together into what I thought was a very satisfying film.
That's cool, I can understand how someone might not be affected by the dialogue and just be taken in by the mise-en-scene. Some of the direction in Brick is really good and I can see how someone could view it as a "beautiful contradiction". For me, it's the screenplay that is the foundation for a film, and like you say the dialogue here and how it was spoken took me out of hte experience and made the major characters sound pretentious beyond their years, which had a snowball effect of me not caring about them, laughing at them and thinking the whole movie a nicely directed joke.


Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveyJoeG View Post
I didn't necessarily think any of the characters were cool but I loved the fact that the main character's strongest tool was his intelligence. Every bit of conflict he faces he overcomes with his wits. This is extremely rare in movies and I really appreciated it.
I appreciated that too.


Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveyJoeG View Post
I also don't think that the main character of a movie always has to be sympathetic. Some of the most fascinating aspects of characters are their flaws. Brendan is a highly focused and obsessed character. Throughout the movie he's on a mission and most of his actions are exaggerated due to the stress he's feeling. He's very abrasive to the other characters around him, I think he's far from the most likable character in a movie, but that didn't bother me.
I agree that the main character doesn't have to be sympathetic, There Will Be Blood is one of my favorites from recent years and you'll have a hard time sympathizing with Plainview on anything. But for Brendan though, it's more than just not sympathizing with him: it's connected to the script again and the dialogue that he speaks, how he speaks it. Acting too cool for school (literally, ha!) all the time just makes me think you're not cool for anything. Took away most of the tension for me because I didn't really care too much about what was going to happen to him.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveyJoeG View Post
Brendan, the Brain, and the Pin(and femme fatale) are the intellectuals of the movie. The other characters like the jock and muscle are outwitted constantly. That's why I think their dialogue is more similar to real teenagers. Characters like Brendan act and speak more like adults(stylized adults, sure) but they never feel like real high school students, and I'm sure that's intentional.
Definitely intentional: just didn't work at all in my case. It's like having 20-somethings putting on a court room scene, with judge, jury, defendants, the whole spiel and trying to make the viewers believe that this is actually plausible. Brick was stylized but it certainly wanted you to invest in its characters and the story, and make the events believable. So either you're going to make a comedy out of something like this, or you run the risk of not being taken seriously. It's a risk that paid off in some cases, like yours and Bourne's and whoever else appreciates this movie. But for me, and the people I've talked to in my life, it doesn't.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveyJoeG View Post
Not at all, I love discussions like this. I know a lot of times people get defensive during these back-and-forths and think they are being picked on. I have tough skin and film is so subjective that I find it hard to get truly upset by somebody else's opinion. Sorry for the delay in the response, I'm at work and haven't had much time to work on a reply.
All good. This discussion's got me thinking if there is any other movie (that's not a comedy) which uses this children-as-adults type where the dialogue the youngsters speak sounds very adult and serious. I can't think of any, can you?

Last edited by DaMovieMan; 04-15-2012 at 11:55 AM..
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