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Old 01-11-2013, 11:14 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by viceus View Post
I wasn't settling with Chastain to begin with, but I begun to grow fond of her character as the film ticked on. Some are grumbling that there is a lack of development with the Chastain. Firstly, I don't think there is much complexity to this character. This is hinted at in a dinner scene with Jennifer Ehle (reminiscent of Meryl Streep in one's salad days?) when she attempts to dig around for a personal background. She jokes, "Do you even have any friends?", which seems to weaken Chastain. She falls silent. In another, James Gandolfini attempts to plug her for the same, to which she rebuffs. However, we do find out that she was recruited in High School. High School. This woman wasn't given the chance to develop a life outside of the C.I.A. As far as the film is concerned this woman has no past, no friends, and no consideration of what lies ahead for herself. She lives in the now. This is also communicated at the very end of the film

I feel that the final scene speaks volumes through its silence.
My point is not about her having no friends, no social life, consumed by her work. I am fine with all that. In fact that is probably the strongest point of the script. My problem is THAT'S THE ONLY SIDE THEY SHOW OF HER. Just because one has no friends and is consumed by work does not mean they are one sided and lack any sort of complexity of character. There was no dichotomy here, no juxtaposition between any of the government types. They were all the same, they were as I stated above, the same we have always seen portrayed in movies. Cookie cutter characters.......ZZZZZZZZZZZ.....puts me to sleep every time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by viceus View Post
I found almost every minute of ZDT riveting. Not at one point did it stall or splutter, which sees credit due to well-conducted, thorough research, cutting and pasting of the events (wholly true or otherwise, we will never know), and knitting it so tightly together. The film consistently builds on suspense and sustains right up until the last minute of the 20min+ compound attack, which I see as large accomplishment seeing how it was no surprise as to the outcome. I was on tenterhooks.
It is the same formula used in all of the spy thrillers I mentioned above only they did it better. No new ground here either. Again, IMO, Bigelow took no chances here whereas with Hurt Locker she really took big chances and delivered a completely complex and compelling character and story. A fresh look. Zero Dark felt very same 'ol, same 'ol to me.

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Originally Posted by viceus View Post
The year's best American film.

Whoever nixed Bigelow for the Direction nom deserves a clouting.
I guess that's why they call it taste and why so many people complain about the Awards. Of all the best pic noms I would say three are decent and entertaining but none would I consider even close to the best of the year or best American film by a long shot.
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