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  #1  
Old 09-27-2006, 10:37 AM
Has anyone else tackled The Count of Monte Christo?

Wow. What a brick of a book. But may I just say that the reading of it resulted in one of the most rewarding months of my life. It is an inspirational fantastic example of perfect story telling.

Edmund Dantes is in all of us.
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  #2  
Old 09-27-2006, 11:56 AM
i have yet to check the book out but its on my list of must reads since ive seen 2 film adaptations which i loved and got me interested in it
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  #3  
Old 09-27-2006, 01:22 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by Cronos
i have yet to check the book out but its on my list of must reads since ive seen 2 film adaptations which i loved and got me interested in it
Do not expect anything like the movies. The closest movie to the book is the made for tv one w/ Richard Chamberlain from the seventies. But still, it doesnt touch some of the very central elements of the story. The Jim Caviezel version of the movie is good on it's own but as an adaptation, it's a travesty. Huge liberties were taken with the story.

But the book is one of the best I've ever read.
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  #4  
Old 09-27-2006, 01:44 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by SIREN30
Do not expect anything like the movies. The closest movie to the book is the made for tv one w/ Richard Chamberlain from the seventies. But still, it doesnt touch some of the very central elements of the story. The Jim Caviezel version of the movie is good on it's own but as an adaptation, it's a travesty. Huge liberties were taken with the story.

But the book is one of the best I've ever read.
Haven't seen the Richard Chamberlain one (I don't think). Nor have I read the book. But the four part made for French TV adaptation starring Gerard Depardieu is reportedly by far the most faithful adaptation. Having not read the book I can't comment. But it is excellent.
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  #5  
Old 09-28-2006, 08:05 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by Psychocandy
Haven't seen the Richard Chamberlain one (I don't think). Nor have I read the book. But the four part made for French TV adaptation starring Gerard Depardieu is reportedly by far the most faithful adaptation. Having not read the book I can't comment. But it is excellent.
Actually, it isnt. The Richard Chamberlain one is exactly by the book what it covers but since it's not a very long movie, alot is left out. But nothing is changed. The Gerard Depardieu version is the longest so it SHOULD be the most faithful but there are liberties taken with the story that make me a bit angry. They were unnecessary and the change alot of the impetus of the novel. But I'll let you read the book and decide for yourself
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  #6  
Old 09-28-2006, 11:04 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by SIREN30
Do not expect anything like the movies. The closest movie to the book is the made for tv one w/ Richard Chamberlain from the seventies. But still, it doesnt touch some of the very central elements of the story.
yeah, considering the length of the book i wasnt expecting either of the films ive seen (the 70s TV and 2002 adaptations) to contain everything, it was more the story that the films revolve around that got me interested
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  #7  
Old 09-28-2006, 08:45 PM
Great book... I don't know if it's the best I've ever read, but I enjoyed it more than Three Musketeers so that makes it my favorite Dumas book
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  #8  
Old 09-29-2006, 08:08 AM
No, it's not the best I've ever read. It's one of themthough. The best book ever, imo, is THE MAN WHO LAUGHS by Victor Hugo. I am still an avid lover of Hugo's novels.

Check out my page-a-day blog at:

www.themanwholaughs.blogspot.com
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  #9  
Old 10-29-2006, 09:44 PM
Can you tell me what is cut out of the abridged version? It is minus 1000 pages. From my understanding, it's mostly inner monologue of Dantes.

I really like the concept of the book, and it is sort of on my list.. But I often really don't enjoy older books, particularly those that have been translated. I didn't get to far into the first Musketeer novel before giving up. Older books like that make me really feel that the author is being paid by the page - or that the authors are huge believers in the more-is-more train of thought...
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  #10  
Old 10-29-2006, 10:48 PM
I'm actually picking this up once I finish A Clockwork Orange
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  #11  
Old 11-06-2006, 10:42 AM
I've watched the Jim Caviezel version of the film and enjoyed it. Kind of glad that it strayed away from the book. Now I can get it and enjoy reading it without the film n the back of my mind.
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  #12  
Old 11-07-2006, 01:19 AM
Reading that book is a journey and a half.
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  #13  
Old 11-12-2006, 04:17 PM
tackled just the movie...
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  #14  
Old 11-14-2006, 02:36 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by Jim H
Older books like that make me really feel that the author is being paid by the page -
I'm not sure if you know this, but your statement is literally correct. For example Count Of Monte Cristo was originally released as a serial - In newspaper, if I recall correctly - with each episode giving Dumas a paycheck. So it was in the interest of Dumas to fill it with lot of trivial stuff and give the readers just enough meat to keep the hooked for the next issue. He got more money the longer the story went.
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  #15  
Old 11-14-2006, 10:22 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by Tuukka
I'm not sure if you know this, but your statement is literally correct. For example Count Of Monte Cristo was originally released as a serial - In newspaper, if I recall correctly - with each episode giving Dumas a paycheck. So it was in the interest of Dumas to fill it with lot of trivial stuff and give the readers just enough meat to keep the hooked for the next issue. He got more money the longer the story went.
I had heard this before, but I'm not aware of the exact books which are written with this in mind (I know some of Dicken's work is like that, for example).
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  #16  
Old 11-16-2006, 06:22 PM
Actually a lot of famous authors including Dumas and Dickens did this exact thing
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