#1  
Old 05-12-2003, 05:19 PM
Anyone Like Lovecraft?

If you do, what are your favortie stories?

If not, why don't you care for his writing? Not intended as a slight of anyone's opinion. Just wondering what about him turns you off.
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  #2  
Old 05-12-2003, 06:29 PM
Where to begin...oh where to begin..

Shadow over Innsmouth and Dagon are definitely way up there.

At the Mountains of Madness is a decent one also ( cant wait for the movie)


There is so many...

The Moon-bog and The lurking fear are two if my favorites though.

Must have been the mood I was in when I read them.

The man is a genious.
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  #3  
Old 05-13-2003, 11:20 AM
I agree. My personal favorite is "The Colour Out Of Space". "The Call of Cthulhu" is also very good as is "The Rats in The Walls".
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  #4  
Old 05-20-2003, 03:30 PM
I read Cthulhu's Call,Shadow Over Innsmouth,The Rats in The Walls and some other stories,though, it's hard to say I loved them.Yeah,Innsmouth.. was cool but his stories are sooo like Poe's...Actually,Poe is better .
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  #5  
Old 05-20-2003, 05:36 PM
Poe is very good; I certainly would not argue that point. I personally like Lovecraft a little better. I would definitely recommend "Colour Out Of Space" as one of his best stories. And what is the general feeling regarding other writers in the Mythos (i.e. Lumley, Kuttner, Derleth, Campbell)?
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  #6  
Old 05-22-2003, 12:37 AM
I've been wanting to read some of Lovecraft's books, I really like the film adaptations that are based on his novels/short stories.
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  #7  
Old 05-22-2003, 10:12 AM
How many movies based on Lovecraft's books are out there?
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  #8  
Old 05-22-2003, 01:20 PM
Let's see...

Re-Animator
The Dunwich Horror
Dagon
From Beyond

Anyone know of any others?
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  #9  
Old 06-19-2003, 11:59 PM
I really should be checking these forums more often for threads like this. My favorite Lovecraft stories are:

Herbert West: Re-Animator
The Beast in the Cave
Dagon
The Unnamable
The Alchemist

I enjoy Lovecraft more than Poe because he offers an imagination into fantastic worlds beyond earth. His stories are diverse and this allows the reader to go into something different each time. One story can deal with bringing the dead back to life while another can deal with an alien species that's been around for millions of years.
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  #10  
Old 06-20-2003, 09:52 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by Dead Halloween
How many movies based on Lovecraft's books are out there?
Click HERE!

Most of is finest stories have already been mentioned. The Colour Out of Space, The Shadow Over Innsmouth, his novella The Case of Charles Dexter Ward, and the mini mindfuck The Outsider are my personal faves.
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  #11  
Old 06-20-2003, 01:00 PM
Some of his earlier Dunsany-influenced work is also good. The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath, The Doom That Came to Sarnath, Through the Gates of the Silver Key.
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  #12  
Old 06-20-2003, 02:21 PM
I'm a big fan of Lovecraft and have been ever since a friend gave me one of his short story collections when I was still at school. I devoured it over a single weekend then set about reading just about everything else the guy ever wrote. Anyone who enjoys Lovecraft's stories should also check out the following books.

Brian Lumley has written a whole load of Lovecraft inspired novels and short stories. All of them are very good indeed. He has a firm understanding of what made Lovecraft's stories work.





Ramsey Campbell is another writer who has produced numerous short stories based upon Lovecraft's Mythos. Many of these tales are collected in Cold Print. All of them are pretty much as good as the best that Lovecraft had to offer. Campbell is a tremendous writer.

There are also tons of excellent short story collection containing stories inspired by Lovecraft's Mythos. Tales Of The Cthulu Mythos is a great example.



Most of these books are easily found on Amazon but sometimes I would advise checking Ebay first as you can pick up some cracking bargains.
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  #13  
Old 06-20-2003, 05:19 PM
Chaosium a few years back released several anthologies of Lovecraft and other writers based on common themes. I remember The Hastur Cycle, The Shub-Niqqurath Cycle, Made in Goatswood, and The Book of Iod. There were others in the series. These were all very good.
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  #14  
Old 07-14-2003, 06:10 PM

I ve read his Re-animator stories and enjoyed the heck out of em. I also read Dagon and the unnamable, basically Ive read the stories for wich films have been made. Ive only read a few that havent been made into films, like Cold Air, The Beast in the Cave and The Alchemist

But just recently I read this story called The Festival, wich was just incredibly awesome! Its the creepiest story of the ones that I have read!

Lovecraft just sets the mood, so incredibly well on this one! I specially liked how he described that spooky town, and how it was all empty when that guy went to visit it for christmas, I was totally haunted by this story and loved reading every second of it, I hope some of you guys have checked this story out!
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  #15  
Old 07-14-2003, 06:58 PM
I'm actually one of the few schmoes who hate Lovecraft with a passion. In fact, I put up a thread to see if I was the only one earlier. Even though I do respect the contribution that he made to horror literature I find his writings didatic, dry, and just plain boring. I personally and probably the only one to think Stephen King is leagues better than Lovecraft. Sure King may not use as much detail in Lovecraft as far as his short stories go, but to me they are so much more effective. They actually bring me into the world as opposed to Lovecraft who keeps me at such a distance that I never feel any other way than that I am reading a story. Sorry you guys I can't stand Lovecraft and find him to be a truly horrible writer.
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  #16  
Old 07-15-2003, 05:24 PM
No problems. Everyone has different tastes.
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  #17  
Old 07-15-2003, 06:25 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by chinton
I'm actually one of the few schmoes who hate Lovecraft with a passion. In fact, I put up a thread to see if I was the only one earlier. Even though I do respect the contribution that he made to horror literature I find his writings didatic, dry, and just plain boring. I personally and probably the only one to think Stephen King is leagues better than Lovecraft. Sure King may not use as much detail in Lovecraft as far as his short stories go, but to me they are so much more effective. They actually bring me into the world as opposed to Lovecraft who keeps me at such a distance that I never feel any other way than that I am reading a story. Sorry you guys I can't stand Lovecraft and find him to be a truly horrible writer.
Thats you opinion Chinton, and I respect it; but I think its not even fair to compare the two since they are from very seperate times.

Its like comparing Nosferatu a film made in 1922, to From Dusk till Dawn. Obviously todays films are more technologicaly advanced then the films made waay back in the days of silent cinema.

They are both horror writers but they are no contemporary. You can compare King to say Dean R. Koonts, but comparing Lovecraft to King is not a fair comparison in my book.

Just try and enjoy Lovecraft for what he is, not what you want him to be. Otherwise just stick to reading King, then.
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  #18  
Old 08-05-2003, 09:56 PM
One series I've picked up recently and very much enjoyed is Delta Green...What they should've done in the X-Files. Anyone else read this?

www.delta-green.com

Pick up Dark Theatres if you have the chance...Some great stories.
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  #19  
Old 08-14-2003, 07:29 PM
Anyone with any interest in the fiction of Lovecraft just has to check out Yuggoth Cultures And Other Growths by legendary comicbook scribe Alan Moore. It's a three part, 40 page per issue, anthology comic and is certain to be fucking amazing. Check out some of the art.







Here's the blurb from the publishers' site.

Alan Moore's YUGGOTH CULTURES

Writer: Alan Moore
Artists: Bryan Talbot, Val Semieks, Oscar Zarate, Jacen Burrows, Juan Jose Ryp, Mike Wolfer, Marat Mychaels, and others
Covers: Juan Jose Ryp
Cover Color: Nimbus Studios
Readership: Mature Readers
Format: B&W, 40 pages, monthly, 3 issue mini-series

The magical mind of Alan Moore is unleashed in this new monthly series which weighs in at a super-sized 40 pages per issue! Yuggoth Cultures and Other Growths features tons of Alan's classic short sequential comic book stories that have been long out of print, stories that have never before been seen, and special developmental sections with original script pages and comments from Alan and the creators! This debut issue features the amazing Nightjar, a story written 20 years ago to run in legendary British comic anthology Warrior Magazine, but never fully drawn. With art by Bryan Talbot, the first part of the story is finally illustrated and sees print here along with Moore's notes on where the series was originally going to go. As a special bonus, we include Alan's original script. Nightjar is a true lost gem that fans have been dying to see for two decades, polished for publication for the first time ever! Also in this issue is the story Zaman's Hill, originally written for Moore's aborted novel titled Yuggoth Cultures, now seen in sequential form by master illustrator Juan Jose Ryp! Fans of Alan Moore rejoice, many prayers are finally answered in this career-spanning series from the finest wordsmith in the industry! More Moore surprises to be announced on this career-spanning series.

Alan Moore's Yuggoth Cultures will be available in September 2003 at your local comic shop. Please support your local stores. If you can't find Alan Moore's Yuggoth Cultures locally, you may order it from our direct sales agent here.


And still more info from the site...

Avatar Press has announced that it will publish a career-spanning series of comic book horror stories from one of the medium's acknowledged masters with ALAN MOORE'S YUGGOTH CULTURES AND OTHER GROWTHS. The three part, 40 page per issue series begins in September 2003 from Avatar with stories by Moore and artwork from a number of high-profile creators including Bryan Talbot, Val Semieks, Oscar Zarate, Jacen Burrows (ALAN MOORE'S THE COURTYARD, WARREN ELLIS' SCARS), Juan Jose Ryp (ALAN MOORE'S ANOTHER SUBURBAN ROMANCE, FRANK MILLER'S ROBOCOP), and Mike Wolfer (WARREN ELLIS' STRANGE KILLINGS).

The series features classic and little-known comic book stories from throughout Moore's career, some hard-to-find tales that have appeared only in comic books outside the U.S., and some surviving stories from the tragically-lost Lovecraftian Moore epic Yuggoth Cultures, which will be seen here in comic book form for the first time. The YUGGOTH CULTURES AND OTHER GROWTHS series will include such gems as the now-completed first part of Moore and Bryan Talbot's important lost classic NIGHTJAR, a story started 20 years ago which was supposed to appear in UK comic book WARRIOR, the legendary anthology where other Moore classics such as MIRACLEMAN and V FOR VENDETTA appeared.

"Perhaps because it was a symptom of the strangeness of existence or perhaps because it was an unnerving reminder of the cyclic nature of life, but it was really bloody weird returning to and finishing a work that I'd started and abandoned when I was a young underground comic artist trying to break into the mainstream," says NIGHTJAR collaborator Bryan Talbot. "It was definitely weird inking a page drawn on yellowing watercolour board that another me had penciled over twenty years ago. It's not that I'd forgotten drawing it: I could remember penciling those panels, on some, even the music that was playing at the time (a pretty common phenomena), but it did give me a peculiar frisson all of its own."

"I don't know how he had heard about it but William Christensen got in touch, asking if I still had the artwork for the "lost WARRIOR story" NIGHTJAR," Talbot continues. "WARRIOR was the groundbreaking UK comic art periodical published by Dez Skinn (now editor/publisher of COMICS INTERNATIONAL) where Alan Moore made his name before being headhunted by DC Comics, bringing his unique and magisterial talent for writing sequential art universal acclaim. Alan was already contributing MARVELMAN (later MIRACLEMAN) and V FOR VENDETTA and he and I had talked about collaborating on a strip for WARRIOR for a while. We decided upon a horror piece. I started drawing from his script, fitting it in around paying work until, to be mercifully brief, Alan and Dez fell out big time. As a result, Alan stopped contributing to WARRIOR and NIGHTJAR, now with no home, was shelved. NIGHTJAR would have been Alan's first horror work. Many of the ideas he is playing with here emerge later in SWAMP THING, his concept of an urban sorcerer eventually manifesting itself in the form of John Constantine."

As for the Lovecraftian fragments from the series, those stories are also emerging from a tragically-lost project of a different kind. "Yuggoth Cultures was originally intended as a series of texts that would have been inspired by HP Lovecraft's poem cycle FUNGI FROM YUGGOTH," recalls Alan Moore. "Unfortunately, when the texts were about half completed, I left the only copy of three or four of them in a London taxi cab. Since it was impossible to reconstruct, the work went on hold, remaining incomplete. Originally, THE COURTYARD was part of the proposed Yuggoth Cultures package, but there were some other interesting little fragments left over, and I suppose that what's gathered in this series is a collection of those and other interesting fragments. Things from projects that were, for one reason or another, never completed, which perhaps which hold some interest in their own right. I'm looking forward to seeing what is done with them."

Although several of the stories in this new series were scripted by Moore for comic books, the stories originally written for the Yuggoth Cultures series of texts are being adapted by frequent Moore collaborator Antony Johnston (ALAN MOORE'S THE COURTYARD, ALAN MOORE'S ANOTHER SUBURBAN ROMANCE) in consultation with Moore. "Once again I've risked my health and sanity, channeling the Northampton Bard through my weak plebiscite mind for the sake of entertainment. With each adaptation my grip on reality grows weaker, yet my stubble grows longer; a curious paradox, I hope you'll agree. Stop me if you've heard this one before, but working with Alan on these stories has been an absolute pleasure. The pieces I've handled are some of the strangest, most evocative things I've read, forcing me to think in strange and unnatural ways to get the best results possible. I'm really happy with it."

"The piece I am doing is particularly fascinating. It ties H.P. himself directly into the mythos of his fictional world in a truly shocking way," says Yuggoth artist Jacen Burrows (ALAN MOORE'S THE COURTYARD, WARREN ELLIS' SCARS). "I was white knuckled just reading the script and full of visual ideas. It's the kind of project that made me want to do comics in the very beginning. This is the second Antony Johnston-adapted Alan Moore story I have worked on and I know that Antony and I are on the same page visually. I understand his pacing and dynamics better now and have a good idea of just what he is expecting. The fact that this is also a Lovecraft homage, like THE COURTYARD, makes it particularly exciting. It's an wonderful visual world to be playing in. Once again I find myself in one of the most enviable positions in comics, working on an Alan Moore horror project with a publisher that doesn't pull punches so we can portray the concept as it was meant. Don't think for a second that I don't realize just how cool this is."

"With each successive illustrating assignment that I've been given by Avatar Press, I'm challenged in new and exciting ways to brings another's words to life. LITVINOFF'S BOOK is yet another example of that challenge," says artist Mike Wolfer (WARREN ELLIS' STRANGE KILLINGS) of his Yuggoth collaboration. "It has been a longtime dream of mine to one day illustrate Alan Moore's work, but equally exciting is that this story has allowed me to move in directions that I've rarely had the opportunity to pursue as a visual storyteller. Alan's original words and Antony Johnston's adaptation of that work hold such a lyrical quality that this feels akin to storyboarding a tragic, operatic short film. The rhythm of the artwork must be synchronized with the rhythm of the written words, but beauty aside, it still holds a gut-wrenching impact for the reader."

"As a Moore fan from the WARRIOR days myself, I'm proud to be bringing this career-spanning range of Moore work to a whole new audience," Avatar Press editor-in-chief William Christensen concludes. "There are a number of comic book stories here that are either long out of print or never saw print in the first place, and others that only saw print long ago in now-obscure UK comic books. And as for the Lovecraftian stories, we'll be taking the same care and painstaking collaboration with Moore himself in adapting them to sequential form that made Alan Moore's The Courtyard one of the most critically-acclaimed indy projects of the year."

ALAN MOORE'S YUGGOTH CULTURES is a three part, 40 page per issue mini-series beginning in September 2003 from Avatar Press. The series features stories by Alan Moore with artwork from a number of high-profile creators including Bryan Talbot, Val Semieks, Oscar Zarate, Jacen Burrows, Juan Jose Ryp, and Mike Wolfer, with covers by Juan Jose Ryp.
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  #20  
Old 08-15-2003, 01:32 AM
I'm just recently getting into Brian Lumley. I've read the first three books in the Necroscope series. I'm eager to read his Lovecrafting mythos work, but I want to read all the Necroscope books first (and there are many!) Trouble is that now that I'm in South Korea, I can't find any of his books. I might get a credit card soon just so I can order them from Amazon or somewhere.
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  #21  
Old 08-17-2003, 05:08 PM
My favorite Lovecraft stories? A shorter list would be the ones I didn't like. HPL's very best, in my opinion, are:

"The Dunwich Horror"
"At the Mountains of Madness"
"The Silver Key"
"The Dream-Quest of Unknown Kadath"
"The Dreams in the Witch-House"
"Case of Charles Dexter Ward"
"The Festival"
"The Lurking Fear"
"In the Walls of Eryx"
"The Rats in the Walls"
"The Colour Out of Space"
'The Whisperer in Darkness"
"The Shadow Over Innsmouth"
"The Call of Cthulhu"

And, of course, the stories about my favorite Mythos entity -- Nyarlathotep:

"Nyarlathotep"
"The Haunter of the Dark"

I'm not really fond of the stories August Derleth "co-authored" with Lovecraft, but I do like "The Luker at the Threshold" and "The Horror from the Middle Span."

If you can get ahold of them, I highly recommend Tales from the Cthulhu Mythos, [best - "Ubbu-Sathla" C.A. Smith; "The Black Stone" R.E. Howard; "Notebook found in a Deserted House" R. Bloch; "The Terror from the Depths" F. Leiber; "Cold Print" R. Campbell; ""Sticks" K.E. Wagner; and "Jerusalem's Lot" S. King] published by Arkham House, and New Tales of the Cthulhu Mythos [all of which are great] edited by Ramsey Campbell.

Also, anybody read Shadows Bend, by David Barbour and Richard Raleigh? The two main characters are H. P. Lovecraft and Robert E. Howard, themselves, with a cameo by Clark Ashton Smith. In all honesty it's a bit of a disappointment; the plot is a little shaggy, and the writing is inconsistant at best, but it's readable and I'd still recommend it to Lovecraft/Howard fans if only for novelty's sake.

My favorite writers in the Lovecraftian vein are Ramsey Campbell, whose collection Cold Print are all Mythos and Mythos-style stories, and Thomas Ligotti, whose stories aren't strictly Mythos, but are clearly inspired by Lovecraft's work. Robert (Psycho) Block wrote a Mythos novel called Strange Eons that's worth picking up if you can find it, and Chaosium republished his Mythos tales in a volume called Mysteries of the Worm. Good Shtuff. I also love Fritz Leiber, Clark Ashton Smith, and Robert E. Howard. I confess I'm not all than fond of Brian Lumley, although I like some of his short stories.

I'm curious about how chinton feels about King's short story "Jerusalm's Lot" in the collection Night Shift, which is a dead-on pastiche of Lovecraft.

Last edited by the night watchman; 08-17-2003 at 06:41 PM..
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  #22  
Old 08-17-2003, 05:27 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by the night watchman
I'm curious about how chinton feels about King's short story "Jerusalm's Lot" in the collection Night Shift, which is a dead-on pastiche of Lovecraft.
That's not King's only foray into Lovecraft territory. His Gramma had some Lovecraftian elements and I always felt that aspects of The Mist were derived from the mythos. King also contributed the story Crouch End to The New Tales Of The Cthulhu Mythos anthology.
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  #23  
Old 08-17-2003, 06:39 PM
Yeah, those have Mythos elements, but "Jerusalem's Lot" was written to read like a Lovecraft story.
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