#1  
Old 11-22-2005, 08:14 PM
SciFi & Fantasy books

Could you recomend me some good sci fi or fantasy books?
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  #2  
Old 11-22-2005, 10:08 PM
Ender's Game, not only is it the best sci-fi book I've ever read, but one of the best books period.
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  #3  
Old 11-22-2005, 10:30 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by Dragonforce
Ender's Game, not only is it the best sci-fi book I've ever read, but one of the best books period.
Exactly what I was going to suggest, I'm reading it right now.

Dead, Ender's Game is very anime-like in plot, I bet you'd like it.

Last edited by X-Nightcrawler; 11-22-2005 at 10:33 PM..
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  #4  
Old 11-22-2005, 10:31 PM
Fantasy Books:

The Wheel of TIme series, 12 books in total. By Robert Jordan.

The Runelords series 4 books in total so far. By David Farland. (Being made into an 80million dollar movie.)

A Song of Ice and Fire series by Goerge R. Martin.

Any book written by R.A. Salvatore. Particularly the Drizzt series.

Sword of Shannara series by Terry Brooks.

Sword of Truth series by Terry Goodkind.

Harry Potter

In total, that's like 50 books to read. Better get started.
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  #5  
Old 11-23-2005, 12:42 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by War Movie Mania
Sword of Truth series by Terry Goodkind.
How good are these? I'm very interested in them.

I've been looking for a 'Final Fantasy'/'Xenogears' like kind of fantasy novel. A complex storyline with fantastic elements. Does anyone know of anything that sounds like this?
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  #6  
Old 11-23-2005, 12:45 AM
Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time series is pretty top notch sci-fi/ fantasy reading. Highly recommended from me.
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  #7  
Old 11-23-2005, 11:32 AM
Ender's Game looks interesting, I saw it the other day in a bookstore.
How are the Dune series? I've been always curious about the books after seeing the movie.

Some of my favorite books:
-The Hobbit (Tolkien)
-The Lord of the Rings (Tolkien)
-Call of Cthulhu (Lovecraft)
-No lejos de la tierra (Domingo Santos)
-Legends of the Dragonlance (Margaret Weiss & Tracy Hickman)
-Discworld (Terry Prattchet)
-Robots and Empire (Isaac Asimov)
-Lord of the Flies (William Golding)

Last edited by Dead Halloween; 11-23-2005 at 11:43 AM..
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  #8  
Old 11-23-2005, 03:14 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by X-Nightcrawler
How good are these? I'm very interested in them.

I've been looking for a 'Final Fantasy'/'Xenogears' like kind of fantasy novel. A complex storyline with fantastic elements. Does anyone know of anything that sounds like this?
Hmm. Terry Goodkind is a good auther, the books have dragons, wizards and witches... but really it's not extreme on the fantasy meter.

If your looking for the best Fantasy series, I think most people would agree The Wheel of Time is going to be your best bet.
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  #9  
Old 11-23-2005, 04:09 PM
Man, FUCK Wheel of Time!

It was pretty damned good until about book five, when he started adding more and more and more to it than was needed, failing to tie up loose ends and blatantly ripping off other writers that are better than him in the process.

I say, if he did 8 books like he originally said, it would have been a very tightly woven story that would be packed with greatness, and even ripping off Dune and other books wouldn't have ruined what is otherwise a wonderful series. Instead, he milks each page out to an overblown proportion, aching to get that much more money from the devoted fans. He's almost like the George Lucas of fantasy novels. Oh, wait, no I take that back. He's nowhere near THAT evil (yet).

I love Orson Scott Card, though, and also recommend the Ender series. At least Ender's Game, but the others in the first quadrilogy all have different tones to them, and aren't liked by everyone that reads them. I tried reading A Game of Thrones by George RR Martin about 5 times (I'm on my fifth time as we speak). I don't like it, but EVERYONE else loves it, so I recommend it.

Terry Goodkind is well-loved by many of my friends, as well.

I loved Dune, but it's very dry (no pun intended with the Dessert Planet thing) and I don't know who to recommend it to, because it can be a tough one to like.
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  #10  
Old 11-26-2005, 06:47 AM
I agree with KCMsterpce on WHEEL OF TIME - don't even touch it. Great first couple books but you're only setting yourself up for disappointment with the second half of the series which veers from decent to horrible. I gave up on it after Crossroads of Twilight.

Terry Goodkind's series THE SWORD OF TRUTHI've only read up to the Pillars of Creation - at that point, I still liked the series a fair amount though I hear Naked Empire didn't get the best reviews. Still, despite it starting to drag a little and the similarities in some of the storylines, it's an excellent series and it and WOT were my two favorites back in the day. Faith of the Fallen tends to divide people as some don't like how thinly veiled its relations to today are but I found it to be quite a moving book, especially for a fantasy novel.

By far the best of the bunch right now though without question is George R.R. Martin's A SONG OF ICE AND FIRE which, I see War Movie Mania has already mentioned, as has KcMsterpce. Brilliant, fresh fantasy books in that it completely disregards normal fantasy stereotypes (which are present and run rampant through literally all fantasy works even the good ones) such as the peasant person who has to save the world and shit like that...many things I love about this series (the first 3 books are incredible and just get better with each passing one - haven't read Feast for Crows yet) including its several different perspectives per book (and unlike half assed writing, it truly is several different perspectives), its ability to time and time again flesh out a so-called villain into a 3 dimensional character with reasons for everything they do, it's epic tone without screwing over character development, and Martin's continued resolve to let main characters actually die or get seriously injured.

If it seems slow at the beginning, stick with it. Similar to the WOT series, it took me several tries to start the first book, but once I got into it, it was amazing. - I'd recommend trying to finish the first book and trying the second KcMsterpce to see for sure whether it's up your alley or not.

HOWEVER, if you're looking for something with extreme fantastical elements, this isn't the right series. It does have fantasy elements to it (dragons, a little magic, etc) but for the most part, it plays out a little like a historical epic.

Something with a sci-fii/fantasy element to it that hasn't been mentioned is the trilogy, HIS DARK MATERIALS, starting with The Golden Compass and ending with The Amber Spyglass. Brilliant books that really feel slightly otherworldly but still not fully sci-fi or fantasy for some reason...but for sure, there are many fantastical and sci-fi-ish elements to this series. And don't let the fact that it's always in the young adults section deter you from this series - it's actually VERY adult in nature, very dark, and yes, characters do die in the books. But also beware - if you're extremely ultra conservative religious (in the Catholic faith), these books might not be for you as the last book has stirred up some controversy.

One more series I've always enjoyed is Piers Anthony's THE INCARNATIONS OF IMMORTALITY series...I dunno how you'd call them, I guess fantasy/sci-fi? They take place in the real world sorta but they're each about different incarnations. Seven books altogether, one about death, one about time, fate, war, nature, satan, and finally, god. (I think that's the order as well) If you hate the Xanth series, don't let that deter you from this either - very different from those books, more serious (no puns I promise) and much more fascinating. The first book, On a Pale Horse, was mentioned as a project in development for a film version two years ago maybe on Dark Horizons but I haven't heard anything about it since then.

THE RUNELORDS series was also interesting, though I only got to read the first book I think (I might've read the second as well but I don't think I've gone beyond that). I think they're worth taking at least a look into.

Last edited by JCPhoenix; 11-26-2005 at 06:50 AM..
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  #11  
Old 11-27-2005, 12:09 PM
Sure i know a few of those. A really good sci fi/fantasy book would be the good earth Haven't read it but my parents both bought it for me by accident so it must be good. It's about a chinese farmer who loses his mind and marries the queen of scots who's ex lover by the name of miles gibeson turns out to be a brain eating zombie

My sister read tuesdays with morrie. It's about a football player who after bumping into his old high school teacher falls down a rabbit hole and gets learned the facts about life and is guided through a football stadium by his teacher where he is met by two prophets expected to predict his future. One gives him a red pill, the other gives him a blue pill

Last edited by Bogey93'; 11-27-2005 at 12:11 PM..
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  #12  
Old 11-27-2005, 08:56 PM
If you want the best Fantasy series ever, then read Raymond E Feist's Riftwar Trilogy (Magician, Silverthorn, A Darkness at Sethanon).

He is my favortire author of all time. I have read heaps of fantasy books, including King's Dark Tower series and none of them even come close to these.
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  #13  
Old 11-28-2005, 05:35 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by The Young Son
If you want the best Fantasy series ever, then read Raymond E Feist's Riftwar Trilogy (Magician, Silverthorn, A Darkness at Sethanon).

He is my favortire author of all time. I have read heaps of fantasy books, including King's Dark Tower series and none of them even come close to these.
Totally forgot about that series, it's a great and very very enjoyable read though I sort of lose interest in the overall series after Pug loses the main character status...it does follow the conventions of normal epic fantasy (ie peasant boy becomes all powerful ______ (insert lord, magician, sorcerer, prince, etc) but it does it so enjoyably that i didn't end up really caring that it did.

Simiarly, I remember the Assassin's series as being pretty good as well - the one by Robin Hobb. though i'm not sure if i ever read all of the books...
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  #14  
Old 11-28-2005, 10:08 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by War Movie Mania
Hmm. Terry Goodkind is a good author, the books have dragons, wizards and witches... but really it's not extreme on the fantasy meter.
Jim Butchers books. Check out his website before deciding if they're right for you. http://www.jim-butcher.com
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  #15  
Old 11-29-2005, 12:01 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by Dragonforce
Ender's Game, not only is it the best sci-fi book I've ever read, but one of the best books period.
My favorite book. I own the entire series and have read the original at least 4 times.
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  #16  
Old 11-29-2005, 12:30 PM
Just bought:

-Ender's Game
-Dune
-Discworld: Soul Music
-Discworld: Moving Pictures
-I am legend
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  #17  
Old 01-11-2006, 05:29 PM
Having just read Ender's Game last night (and being blown away), I gotta add my thumbs up to those who recommended that book.
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  #18  
Old 01-12-2006, 10:14 AM
I don't read too much science fiction, but as far as fantasy goes, it doesn't hurt to start with some classics:The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings & The Silmarillion. You can't go wrong with these.

I would say The Chronicles of Narnia & His Dark Materials are polar opposites, and highly recommended reading. Both are brilliant works.

Frank L Baum's OZ books are great books, entertaining and very short. There are fifteen in total and well worth a look.

As someone else said, R.A. Salvatore's Forgotten Realms novels are brilliant, Drizzt Do'Urden is probably the most well developed character in the fantasy genre.
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  #19  
Old 04-23-2006, 06:42 PM
I have to recommend a couple of my favorite science fiction books by Robert Heinlein.

Start with: Stranger in a Strange Land and if you like that one, proceed to: The Cat Who Walks Through Walls. Both have excellent character development and very rich, detailed worlds.

Hopefully, someday, Stranger in a Strange Land will be made into a movie but it will take a lot of important factors for it to work such as the right cast and a well written adaptation. Thank goodness it did not get made several years ago when Tom Hanks had been rumored to star. That would have been sooo very wrong since he is nothing like the lead character even if he is a great actor.
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  #20  
Old 04-23-2006, 07:29 PM
Lol I just quite reading Strnage In A Strangeland. I also quite reading Starship Troopers by him. I just cant get into his writing.


Enders Game and Childhood End are excellent.


Also try two very underrated books by Walter Tevis The Man Who Fell To Earth and Mockingbird . Two amazing novels.
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  #21  
Old 04-23-2006, 07:43 PM
I'm quite into science fiction but find it hard to get a good book! At them moment I'm really into anything by an author called Jon Courtney Grimwood, his biggest books are probably his Ashraf Bey series (Pashazade, Effendi and Falaheen) which are very good. But I like his older stuff like Re-mix and Red Robe. He has a new book out but I've not read it yet as I have loads to read and never buy any book new!

His writing style is very fluid and his worlds are very interesting to me, he always paints a picture of a dark future but the technology he describes is brilliant. It's hard to explain the stories but they're mostly detective type stories but it's the world that appeals to me most and the characters. He has a new book just out I think something to do with a fox.

Fantasy wise I'm reading Stephen King's Dark Tower series at the moment I'm currently on book 3, it's a long series (7 in all) and so far I'm very impressed, I've always love King's writing stlye but thought the stories where just stupid, but this is really engrossing and such a good story so far.
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  #22  
Old 05-05-2006, 11:50 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by Dead Halloween .
How are the Dune series? I've been always curious about the books after seeing the movie.

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I personally thought that Dune was a great read. It took me a while to get through and parts could be a bit confusing, but overall it was worth it. The glossary in the back definitely comes in handy!

I've never read any of the Dune sequels. Anybody here read any of them?
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  #23  
Old 05-07-2006, 12:10 AM
DAN SIMMONS anyone?

Hyperion Cantos and Ilium and Olympos.

Also "The Other Side of the Mountain" by Michael Bernanos is a great mind-fuck of a book. Very short at 100 pages but a crazy read.
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  #24  
Old 05-07-2006, 07:27 PM
I would recommend the Han Solo trilogy by AC Crispin. It basically follows Han from his earliest memory all the way up to his meeting with Luke and the others in the Cantina

Also, Good Omens by Terry Prachett and Neil Gaimen is probably the most entertaining books I have ever read. Its footnotes read like the actual Hitchhikers Guide excerpts.

The beginning parts of the Dark Tower series espcially The GUnslinger and The Drawing of the Three are great. After that it starts going down hill. I have put the series off for awhile stuck on book 5 to read other books.
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  #25  
Old 05-27-2006, 01:29 AM
Wheel of Time bored me to death.

Man, forget all this mainstream stuff. I like to read the hidden gems no one has heard of:

Far Seer by Robert J Sawyer



Best book I've ever read. And its two sequels were equally amazing.

Forrests of the Night by S. Andrew Swann


Awesome future action-nior detective story about geneticly engineered human/animal hybrids.

The Fire Rose by Mercedes Lackey


Great werewolf fantasy-love story set against the 1906 San Fransico earthquake.

Samurai Cat series by Mark E Rogers


These books are hilarious - and getting harder and harder to find.
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  #26  
Old 05-29-2006, 01:21 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by Dead Halloween
Ender's Game looks interesting, I saw it the other day in a bookstore.
How are the Dune series? I've been always curious about the books after seeing the movie.

Some of my favorite books:
-The Hobbit (Tolkien)
-The Lord of the Rings (Tolkien)
-Call of Cthulhu (Lovecraft)
-No lejos de la tierra (Domingo Santos)
-Legends of the Dragonlance (Margaret Weiss & Tracy Hickman)
-Discworld (Terry Prattchet)
-Robots and Empire (Isaac Asimov)
-Lord of the Flies (William Golding)
I don't know much about Fantasy, but I have very fond memories of LeGuin's "Earthsea" series, which is at least among more highbrow minded readers widely considered as the only real challenger to Lord Of The Rings.

On the other hand, I'm a big sci-fi reader:

The first Dune book I recall was good, but the series quickly decreased in quality. It was all very soap-opera -esque stuff, I recall. But if you need a fix with lightweight sci-fi, it might work for you.

Ender's Game indeed is one of the best sci-fi books ever written.

Hyperion 1 & 2 are brilliant, and among the very best sci-fi stories ever written. Parts 3 & 4 tell a different story in the same fictional universe, and they are much lesser in quality.

Ian Bank's "Culture" series varies a great deal in quality, but "Player Of Games" is a good introduction and a good book - From there move on to "Use Of Weapons", which might be a demanding read, but is one of the most brilliant books ever written. A fucking masterpiece.

Philip K. Dick's best book is "A Scanner Darkly", and it's among the greatest of sci-fi.

LeGuin is also a sci-fi writer, and "Left Hand Of Darkness" and "The Word for World Is Forest" are among my personal favourites from her.

Those came at the top of my head, since I've read these writer's stuff recently. But there is much more.

Last edited by Tuukka; 05-29-2006 at 01:28 PM..
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  #27  
Old 07-06-2006, 12:53 PM
I just got done reading Joe Haldeman's The Forever War and it stands proudly alongside Ender's Game as the best military sci-fi novel i've read. Highly recommended. I'm now reading Michael Moorcock's Elric (the edition released as part of Orion's Fantasy Masterworks series) and even though i'm only about 50 or so pages in i'm hooked. Reminds me a lot of Robert E. Howard's Conan series but with a less likeable (but thoroughly interesting) central character. I'm going through a bit of a sci-fi & fantasy kick at the moment.
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  #28  
Old 07-06-2006, 04:38 PM
I would really recommend A Song of Ice and Fire by George R. R. Martin.
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  #29  
Old 08-14-2006, 08:40 PM
Discworld novels by Terry Pratchett- They start as a parody of the fantasy genre and grow in a wonderful wonderful way into parodies of the real world. Originally they could be read independently but the recent ones have recalled stuff so often from the previous that I would now recommed reading them in order. He also does "children's" books set in the same world: The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents, The Wee Free Men, and Hat Full of Sky that are simply mind blowing... Sam Raimi is supposed to bring Wee Free to the big screen.

The Black Company by Glen Cook... just the opposite of Pratchett. Dark, dark, dark. Interesting take on fantasy from a very bizzare perspective. First fantasy series I read in a loooong time that actually made magic seem strange and frightening. Excellent characters (good and bad) I can't say enough about this series.

Anything by William Gibson for Sci Fi. Often referred to at the godfather or grandfather of cyberpunk... with good reason. Please don't whip out your calendar and tell me "Well so and so wrote such and such before..." In our hearts we know its true. The people who do it as well as him and as consistently as him are few and far between.
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  #30  
Old 08-14-2006, 09:39 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by Tuukka
I don't know much about Fantasy, but I have very fond memories of LeGuin's "Earthsea" series, which is at least among more highbrow minded readers widely considered as the only real challenger to Lord Of The Rings.
.
I enjoyed those books as a kid. I read somewhere that the guy who created Spirited Away and My neighbor Totoro, whose name I can't spell and I'm too lazy to look up right now is planning to adapt that series for his next anime.

That info got me all anticipated.
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  #31  
Old 08-21-2006, 07:28 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by JCPhoenix
Having just read Ender's Game last night (and being blown away), I gotta add my thumbs up to those who recommended that book.
I finished the same novel yesterday..,. One of the best books I've read in ages. Wouldn't an Adaptation of this in the same medium as Robert Zemeckis is doing with the very R rated Beowulf (In the same style as Polar Express and Monster House) rock the house?
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