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  #1  
Old 05-02-2007, 12:11 PM
Most emotionally moving book/comic/graphic novel?

It doesn't have to be your favorite...
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  #2  
Old 05-02-2007, 01:41 PM
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  #3  
Old 05-02-2007, 04:02 PM
I thought "It" was very empotional at parts. Same for "House of Leaves". Both very sad books.
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  #4  
Old 05-02-2007, 04:40 PM
"It" came to mind first. Especially the ending. Plus I've always loved the idea of growing up in a stereotypical Norman Rockwell suburban neighborhood. So I naturally became more connected to it.

Others--
1984-One of the most depressing, terrifying, and completely sobering things I've ever experienced.
Catcher In The Rye-I hate to have the cliched angsty teenager response, but I really did connect with it. It just made sense to me.
The Jungle-A little overdone, but still really depressing.
Lone Wolf And Cub-Comic masterpiece. Very emotional at points.

I think there's probably others, can't think right now...
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  #5  
Old 05-02-2007, 05:29 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by Powerslave
"It" came to mind first. Especially the ending. Plus I've always loved the idea of growing up in a stereotypical Norman Rockwell suburban neighborhood. So I naturally became more connected to it.

Others--
1984-One of the most depressing, terrifying, and completely sobering things I've ever experienced.
Catcher In The Rye-I hate to have the cliched angsty teenager response, but I really did connect with it. It just made sense to me.
Totally agreed. For being such an amazing horror story, "It" had it's emotional moments. Just proves King's genius. "1984" is the perfect dystopian novel, and I'm with you on the cliched teen angst resonse with "Catcher in the Rye".
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  #6  
Old 05-02-2007, 07:00 PM
To Kill A Mockingbird
Grapes of Wrath
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  #7  
Old 05-08-2007, 02:42 AM
The original Crow comic/graphic novel really connected to me emoitonally, the whole losing something beautifull, the sadness of it really got to me.
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  #8  
Old 06-08-2007, 01:17 AM
a sinjgle smpider-man issue where it's peter talkin to uncle ben. I've never seen snowmen used so emotionally
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  #9  
Old 06-08-2007, 05:23 AM
BOOK




GRAPHIC NOVEL



amazing read.great art as well.heck if a graphic novel can make me cry its somehting good .


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maus

The Jews are represented by mice.
The Germans are represented by cats.
The Americans are represented by dogs.
The Poles are represented by pigs.
The Roma (Gypsies) are represented as gypsy moths.
The French are represented by frogs.
The Swedes are represented by reindeer.
The British are represented by fish.
The child of a Jew and a German is shown as a mouse with cat stripes.
The animals are presumably chosen based on the characteristics of the nation/racial group chosen, and some obvious allegories can be seen[1]:

The Jews, as mice, can be seen as weak and helpless victims, as well as satirizing the Nazi portrayal of Jews. Also the German verb 'Mauscheln' (which visually if not etymologically includes the word 'Maus' - mouse) means originally 'to talk like a Jew'[2].
The Germans, as cats, suggest power over the Jews, as well as malevolence (cats often play with mice before killing them).
Dogs for the Americans suggest power, as well as friendliness, loyalty and many other positive values. Unlike other animals used, the dog faces Spiegelman uses vary from character to character. Perhaps this is to represent how Americans come from many different places (for example, the African-American hitchhiker is portrayed as a black dog). The stereotypical dog also dislikes cats and may attack them. The choice of dog may have been inspired by the term "dogface," which was a common nickname for the American G.I. (especially infantry) during the WWII era. It may also be an allusion to some cartoons, such as Tom and Jerry, in which a dog (Spike) will protect a mouse from a cat, or it may also refer to a German reference to American Marines as Teufelhunden or "Devil Hounds" during World War I.
The use of pigs as Polish suggests more negative views: as well as greed, the Poles/pigs are brutal (Spiegelman mentions a Jew who survived the war, only to be murdered by Poles when he returned home.) After the comic was released in Poland many Poles found it very offensive to be represented by pigs. Spiegelman explained that he chose pigs in good faith because of their resemblance to famous American cartoon characters like Miss Piggy and Porky Pig.
The sole gypsy is represented by a Gypsy moth; she tells the fortune of Anja, Vladek's wife. It seems to represent an exotic, mysterious personality that was and still is the common preception of the Romani people.
The French being frogs would appear to be a direct reference to an oft-used nickname, itself a lampoon of the fact that the French are supposedly renowned for eating frogs: it is also, however, suggested that Spiegelman wanted a certain amount of sliminess about the French, as he says to his (French) wife: "Bunnies are too innocent for the French... Think of the years of anti-Semitism."
The Swedish as deer suggests reindeer. It also suggests the Swedish possibly being timid; a reference to Sweden's neutrality in World War II.
The British as fish suggests an aquatic creature, a metaphor of British naval supremacy. It might also be a reference to "Fish and chips", or 'Cold Fish'. Also, as the Germans are cats, and cats like to eat fish, but usually can't, this may refer to the antagonism between Germany and Britain at that time. It may also have something to do with a WWII speech made by Winston Churchill, which said the English are afraid of the prospect of war, but mockingly added "so are the fishes".
Vladek as a senior citizen mouse wears glasses. However, most of the time he is drawn as wearing pince-nez just like Scrooge McDuck. Scrooge's creator Carl Barks was an influence on Spiegelman, who was later chosen to write an obituary for Barks that was published in The New York Times.
With the exception of the Americans (dogs), the animal characters are all drawn alike. For instance, most of the Jewish mice resemble each other regardless of sex or age. Clothing and other details are used in order to tell them apart: Spiegelman himself, for instance, is always wearing a white shirt and a black sleeveless overshirt; his French wife, Françoise, wears a striped t-shirt. While wandering the streets of their Nazi-occupied town, the Jews wear pig masks in order to show the trouble they went through to pass off as non-Jewish Poles.

The use of animals in the graphic novel may seem incongruous, but instead of creating social stereotypes, Spiegelman attempts to lampoon them and show how stupid it is to classify a human being based on nationality or ethnicity.[3] His images are not his: they were "borrowed from the Germans... Ultimately what the book is about is the commonality of human beings. It's crazy to divide things down along nationalistic or racial or religious lines... These metaphors, which are meant to self-destruct in my book - and I think they do self-destruct - still have a residual force and still get people worked up over them."
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  #10  
Old 06-15-2007, 05:56 AM
of mice and men
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  #11  
Old 06-27-2007, 09:48 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by Chilean Thunder
a sinjgle smpider-man issue where it's peter talkin to uncle ben. I've never seen snowmen used so emotionally
Can't agree with you more! And the one witten by Jenkins also, in which Peter goes to see a baseball match and remembers his uncle, and the one with the little black kid thinking Spidey was his dead father... and let's not forget the one in Amazing Spider-Man in which aunt May "dies", Ben Reilly "Scarlet Spider" crying on the rooftops, honestly that issue made me cry... a shame I wasted my tears for a fake May that Osborn placed. Fortunately Spidey did something about that!
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  #12  
Old 06-27-2007, 10:34 AM
The last few issues of the Sandman got to me a little too much.
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