#1  
Old 07-18-2008, 08:28 AM
The Dark Knight (SPOILERS ALERT)

The thing that made Batman Begins work so well is that the characters fit into the story Christopher Nolan was trying to tell. The same can be said for its sequel, The Dark Knight. Where Batman took it to the bad guys in Batman Begins, the sequel shows how the mob retaliates: they let the Joker do his thing.

From his introduction at the movie's intro, we are mesmerized by the Joker, and what he is capable of. We know nothing about his past; the police have nothing on him, he tells many stories about how he got his facial scars. We just know he's a psychopath . . . and he proves it every time he's onscreen. I was one of those that hated the casting of Heath Ledger as the infamous villain; I can safely say I can eat my words. He is awesome as the Joker . . . he's funny, scary, and we know he's dangerous - all at the same time. We watch his every move when he's onscreen and wonder what he's going to do next.

While the Joker steals the show, of course it's not all about him . . . we still have Christian Bale impressing as the titular character. Where he's learning about his new persona in Batman Begins, he continues to grow into the character of Batman, as well as the playboy Bruce Wayne. And we see how Batman has become more trusted by the police, especially Lieutenant/Commissioner Gordon, played very well once again by Gary Oldman. More perfecting casting in the form of Aaron Eckhart as the heroes' new ally, Harvey Dent.

Maggie Gyllenhaal takes over for Katie Holmes, and plays Dent's love interest. I guess you could say she's supposed to be Batman's love interest - which you could say is the case, but she's Dent's girlfriend, and has been for some time when the movie opens. Michael Caine returns as Alfred, as well as Morgan Freeman as Lucius Fox.

Christopher Nolan deserves a lot of credit for the excellence that is The Dark Knight. He didn't just rehash Batman Begins, or what Burton and Schumacher did. He's continued HIS story and characters and, with the introduction of the Joker, has built upon the best Batman series. This isn't just a comic book movie, it's a suspense thriller where the hero(es) is trying to stop the villain from winning. The suspense of some of the scenes had me on the edge of my seat. But the beauty of it is, Nolan (along with the other writers) threw into the mix that it isn't just a situation of good vs. evil, it goes deeper than that. The Joker is one of (if not THE) the greatest villains ever created, and Christopher Nolan and Heath Ledger put the character to great use.

It has everything a movie should have: great characters in a great story, development of that story and its characters, suspense, action, and an ending that will leave the viewer talking about it. The Dark Knight matches its predecessor in excellence, and here's hoping Christopher Nolan and crew have another one in them.

9/10
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  #2  
Old 07-18-2008, 09:58 AM
Hype. This is the word that has been around the boards about this movie for some time. IS it going to live up to it, or we just all rubbing our hands together for a massive disappointment. Myself? I was very optimistic due to Nolan wowing in just about every movie I've seen with him, and how great Batman Begins held on repeat viewings (there are flaws, but still a great movie).

So there i sat, midnight showing at one of y local theaters, with 12 of my good friends sitting with me, anxiously waiting to see if this flick, The Dark knight, lives up to the hype.....and i can safely say that it most definitely does!

From the opening sequence to the rolling credits, not a minute is wasted in this dark and dreary Batman flick. the actors soar, the action set pieces are great, and the locations look phenomenal. Hell, i cant wait to see this shit in IMAX on my second viewing!

On the acting front, Christian Bale is still awesome as Bruce Wayne/Batman. You can see the inner turmoil throughout the flick, and just notice the anxiety and determination that he faces in order to get the job done. His butler, Alfred (Michael Caine), is great as usual. their back and fourths are still awesome, and got laughs out of me.

Now onto The Joker.....oh i meant Heath ledger.....wait.....was that actually Heath? Oh it was.....sorry, i thought i was actually looking at a living breathing Joker in front of my eyes. From his grand entrance to his maddening attacks, i was laughing and feeling uncomfortable with him at the same time. It was just amazing. I coudl say more....but you just have to see for yourself. it's just a tragedy that he couldn't see in his work on screen.

As for the other players in the game, Aaron Eckhart was the shit as Harvey Dent, and for someone who is new in the game, surprised that his story arc was fully evolved and perfect. i loved it. Maggie Glyenhall was a great replacement as Rachel Dawes, and a bit more personality than Katie Holmes in my opinion. then again, she had more to do, so that could be the case.

Anyways, the action set pieces......fucking A! Thats all there is to say! The fight sequences were done better, and the chase sequences were the shit!

Any complaints.....a few.....certain things at the end seemed a little silly at points (but the more i think about it, the more it jives well with the flick), so a second viewing may be in order.....as if i wasnt gonna see it again .

So, overall, The Dark Knight was an adult comic book done right. With great actors acing the roles, and the action galore, this movie is on a different level with most summer blockbuster spectaculars.

9.5/10
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  #3  
Old 07-18-2008, 11:09 AM
An overall awesome movie. I don't think it's the greatest movie ever made like some of the geniuses have said on imdb or elsewhere, but it's sure up there. Nolan never ceases to amaze me with his directing and writing (the other part contributed by his brother). What I liked about this movie the best was that it involved the internal struggle of a hero, along with everyone else. This is what Indy 4 lacked. Most movies do nowadays. Thus why they are horrible and easily forgettable. Everything fits perfectly in place with the Dark Knight. The only thing I could nag about was the length, specifically with the ending. It dragged a bit too long I believe. But, that's just me. Stating the best, obviously, would be Ledger's performance. Utterly amazing. I can't remember the last time I was terrified by a villain. Yet, he invoked comedy and serious philosophical questions as well. However, the biggest highlight of the night for me, was seeing the nerds freak out, scream, yell in the movie theatre when movie appeared out of frame the first couple of seconds upon starting. Priceless.

9/10
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  #4  
Old 07-18-2008, 04:49 PM
Not bad. A little long winded.

Ledger was terrific and his performance was most definitely the high light of the movie. Everyone else just went through the motions. Bale's voice must hurt after growling all of his lines when he wears the bat suit. Good action scenes.

Sorry for not giving a shit if this reads like a review from The Times. I'm fucking tired and maybe I'll add to this later. All in all it was a good movie, but I'm not left feeling like I just watched something earth shattering like the hype would lead one to believe.

8/10

I'd better not go lower than 8. Wouldn't want fanboys giving me a hard time.
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  #5  
Old 07-18-2008, 04:56 PM
Mildly spoiler-free..



I've been a diehard of the Batman character ever since I saw Tim Burton's 1989 film as kid. From there I started following the comics, and then we got the wonderful B:TAS cartoon. Has there ever been another character from popular comics that has translated so well, in so many different incarnations (the Schumacher films notwithstanding; may we never speak of those films again).

But Batman as a character was overdue for big-screen re-imagining. 2005's Begins started this trend off right. It was gritty; it had real pathos and depth of feeling. Put simply, it really made you believe how and why a man like Bruce Wayne could and would suit up and take on crime, and his own personal demons, in this way. Also, Begins was truly the first faithful translation from the comic to the screen.

But that was just the precursor to what was to come. The stakes in The Dark Knight are even higher. Christopher Nolan pushes his vision, and his cast and crew, even further in this film. It takes place one year after Begins; Christian Bale's Batman now hides out underneath the facade of an old Wayne Enterprises building. He still is waging his war on crime, now aided by the dashing new district attorney Harvey Dent, who, alongside Lt. James Gordon, is one of the few public servants Bruce thinks he can trust. Unfortunately, Bruce's former flame Rachel Dawes has also fallen hard for Dent.

Aaron Eckhart as Dent really is the crux of this film. His is the most tragic and changing story arc. When he, Rachel, Bruce and Bruce's new girl-toy are having dinner, and Bruce has to play the part of the clueless millionaire while Dent goes on about fighting crime, Bruce's sense of frustration is palpable. This is the public face of crime fighting that he can never be, lest he ruin his secret identity. It creates some of the film's best conflict: the push-pull between public and private, the double lives that Bruce/Batman and Dent must lead. And it all makes Dent's inevitable transformation that much more hard-hitting.

The other supporting actors, Michael Caine, Morgan Freeman and Gary Oldman among them, are given more to work with in this film than the last. We get to see their stories evolve. One highly surprising twist involves Oldman's Lt. James Gordon (and provoked some of the loudest cheers in the theater I was watching this movie in, as his story plays out). Freeman's Lucius Fox is ever more pushed to the edge of his morals as Wayne becomes more obsessive in his crime-fighting quest. Caine's faithful butler to Bruce, Alfred, now also holds a devastating secret from Bruce involving Rachel Dawes.

As if this all wasn't enough for one film, we get the madcap, frighteningly realistic portrayal by Heath Ledger as the Joker. There's a reason the Joker as a villain has survived over the years, and why he is still one of the Batman's first and best foes. He is truly the embodiment of anarchic, pure evil, as he should be, and Ledger electric captures this almost too well. His Joker is a loose-limbed menace who always has an ace up his sleeve when dealing with Gotham mobsters or the Batman; his is a colorful presence that also gives the film some much needed variety--you literally cannot take your eyes off the screen when he's on, and fittingly as this sort of bad guy he gets to have the most fun of anybody. He represents the danger, and the level of terror, that just one man so inclined can cause. Nolan wisely doesn't try to explain his origin seriously, no vat of green chemicals for this Joker, and that's why it works. The less we understand, the less we know, the more frightful he is. Worlds away (in a good way) from Jack Nicholson's performance in the '89 film, Ledger's Joker works, is a totally fresh and different take on the character, seriously one of the most disturbing and believable transformations any actor has ever pulled off, and one of the best on-screen villians of this or any other movie franchise.

The Dark Knight is a very effective piece of cinema, a comic-film for the ages, and light-years away from every other previous adaptation of this timeless character. It also stands as the purest interpretation of what Bob Kane created back in the 40's (30's?). It would be great on it's own as just a "comic-book film"; as a film, it devastatingly explores the consequences of the choices we make and where they lead us. Nolan and company will be hard-pressed for an encore to this.

9/10
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  #6  
Old 07-19-2008, 12:07 AM


The Dark Knight Ė 10/10

I arrived an hour before show time, eagerly awaiting one of my most anticipated films of all-time. I had been sitting at my house all week, not much to do, but I had to pass the time. I watched some old Batman films, and some other lengthy films just hoping that time would pass by just a little bit faster. Now let me tell you, you better cherish those anticipating moments, because they are all part of the experience. My clan of Dark Knight anticipators arrived; thank God we got tickets because I found out that the showing we were going to had been sold out since Thursday morning. We got our snacks, waited in line for a bit, and then the doors were opened. We were near the front of the line so we got the best of the best seats. We sat there chatting, deeply anticipating what we were about to witness. The lights dimmed, the previews came on. After a slam bang flow of great trailers the movie began. Let me tell you, my eyes have never been so glued to a screen.

The movie starts out with a bank robbery, which gave the film a very similar feel to one of my favourite films, Heat. It really got the ball rolling, and me, my friends, and the rest of the audience knew, just as the Joker was pulling away in his school bus, that we were in for one hell of a treat. I wonít go into great detail on the story, because most of you have either already seen it, or you have not seen it and do not want it to be spoiled for you. Letís just say that it is one of the most captivating stories I have witnessed in years and it was told to perfection. The details so fine, the performances outstanding, the direction flawless, the action astounding, the score brilliant, the screenplay flawless. Now if you take all of those words followed by their respective adjectives and throw them into a pot, chances are youíre going to have one hell of a story, and a well told one at that. This is exactly what happens here.

Everyone has been anticipating the performance of Heath Ledger as The Joker. Whether they were captivated by the previews, have been in love with the character since they were a wee one, or they wanted to see how his final performance turned out. Heath not only plays the Joker well, he actually becomes The Joker. There are two actors who have had two roles a piece this past decade where they have actually become the character. One is Daniel Day-Lewis in both Gangs of New York, as well as There Will Be Blood. The other Heath Ledger, in Brokeback Mountain, as well as his absolutely stunning performance as the infamous Joker in The Dark Knight. Not only is this performance worthy of an Oscar nomination, if he does not win I will not watch the awards show which I have not missed since I was six years old, again. The pencil scene and the nurse scene are just plain and simply astounding.

So yes, Heath was brilliant and Oscar worthy, but he was not the only one putting out brilliant performances. Christian Bale seems to have been lost in the shuffle, because I have not heard much about him from anyone. He gives a great performance. Much sharper and into the character of Bruce Wayne than he was in Batman Begins. He has many scenes that remind me of the old cocky Bruce back in the old cartoons and first few films. Aaron Eckhart gives a wonderful performance as Harvey Dent/Two-Face. His transformation from one character to the next is not only written brilliantly, but executed brilliantly as well. As Dent, heís very sharp, does not seem like a little wimp under the radar because of the monstrous Joker and Batman. He makes the character hold his own and then transforms in unbelievably believable fashion. Michael Caine gives us another great performance as Alfred Pennyworth. I actually enjoyed him more in this than in Batman Begins. He gives us a few moments of comic relief (which worked throughout and didnít take away from the dark nature of the film) and also is involved in some very emotional and heart wrenching moments throughout. Maggie Gyllenhaal does a fantastic job of replacing Katie Holmes and does a much better job than Holmes. Maybe it is because the character is written a little bit differently, but Gyllenhaal seemed to make the character much more believable than Katie Holmesí portrayal in Begins. Gary Oldman gives a great performance as Lt. James Gordon soon to be Commissioner. He is much more involved than in Begins and doesnít just get more screen time for the sake of it, but also adds a lot to the story. Morgan Freeman is great as usual. So overall, the performances are simply brilliant all around. I donít remember the last time a film had so many knockout performances. Probably The Departed.

A problem in Batman Begins was that the action was sometimes hard to see. This problem is COMPLETELY fixed here and I could always tell what was going on, which made it much more enjoyable. All the action scenes are relevant to the story and are not just put there to take up time or satisfy the audience (although it definitely does that!) The sequences are filmed so perfectly. The cinematography perfect through each piece of action. Whether it was the bank robbery, the Joker chase, the Hong Kong sequence or any other action sequence. They were all done to perfection, very reminiscent of Heat.

The direction and cinematography is absolutely flawless. Nolan definitely took criticism the right way after some complaints from Batman Begins. Some of the most gorgeous shots I have seen in years take place right in this very film. Christopher Nolan does a splendid job and I give him mad props for this great accomplishment.

The screenplay was excellently written by Christopher Nolan and brother Johnathan. They move the story along at a brisk pace, while making sure every single detail is nailed to perfection. With all of this, they also manage to write BRILLIANT characters and come up with easily the best dialogue so far this year (even better than In Bruges if you can believe that). I will have to read the thing myself to really see the brilliance, but thereís no doubt that the screenplay had a hell of a lot to do with the astounding final product.

To go a bit more into the story, I was pleased with all of occurrences, twists, turns, revelations. There are a few badass twists that literally had the audience clapping and cheering. There are some very depressing, dark moments that had the audience sitting in their seat without a sound. The movie also does a great job of leading itself up to a very satisfying climax, and an ending which was next to perfect. I cannot remember a story so captivating, going outside the regulated box without going over the top. It never felt like there was too much going on or that there were too many characters who went underdeveloped ala Spider-Man 3. Besides maybe a minor flaw here and there, which are mostly just a few suspend your disbelief comic book flaws, the story is pretty much flawless.

So, I have pretty much gone into detail on all of the key points. Maybe not deep into storyline, because you all know what happened, or are going to know what happened, but I gave you a pretty fair summation of my thoughts. The Dark Knight is a massive improvement on Batman Begins, which is still a great film. Everything is just a few steps up. Acting, story, direction, action, screenplay etc. I am going to be blunt and flat-out say it. he Dark Knight is THE best comic book film ever made, it is by far the best film of the year, and is easily one of the best films of the decade.
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  #7  
Old 07-19-2008, 01:46 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bourne101 View Post


The Dark Knight Ė 10/10

I arrived an hour before show time, eagerly awaiting one of my most anticipated films of all-time. I had been sitting at my house all week, not much to do, but I had to pass the time. I watched some old Batman films, and some other lengthy films just hoping that time would pass by just a little bit faster. Now let me tell you, you better cherish those anticipating moments, because they are all part of the experience. My clan of Dark Knight anticipators arrived; thank God we got tickets because I found out that the showing we were going to had been sold out since Thursday morning. We got our snacks, waited in line for a bit, and then the doors were opened. We were near the front of the line so we got the best of the best seats. We sat there chatting, deeply anticipating what we were about to witness. The lights dimmed, the previews came on. After a slam bang flow of great trailers the movie began. Let me tell you, my eyes have never been so glued to a screen.

The movie starts out with a bank robbery, which gave the film a very similar feel to one of my favourite films, Heat. It really got the ball rolling, and me, my friends, and the rest of the audience knew, just as the Joker was pulling away in his school bus, that we were in for one hell of a treat. I wonít go into great detail on the story, because most of you have either already seen it, or you have not seen it and do not want it to be spoiled for you. Letís just say that it is one of the most captivating stories I have witnessed in years and it was told to perfection. The details so fine, the performances outstanding, the direction flawless, the action astounding, the score brilliant, the screenplay flawless. Now if you take all of those words followed by their respective adjectives and throw them into a pot, chances are youíre going to have one hell of a story, and a well told one at that. This is exactly what happens here.

Everyone has been anticipating the performance of Heath Ledger as The Joker. Whether they were captivated by the previews, have been in love with the character since they were a wee one, or they wanted to see how his final performance turned out. Heath not only plays the Joker well, he actually becomes The Joker. There are two actors who have had two roles a piece this past decade where they have actually become the character. One is Daniel Day-Lewis in both Gangs of New York, as well as There Will Be Blood. The other Heath Ledger, in Brokeback Mountain, as well as his absolutely stunning performance as the infamous Joker in The Dark Knight. Not only is this performance worthy of an Oscar nomination, if he does not win I will not watch the awards show which I have not missed since I was six years old, again. The pencil scene and the nurse scene are just plain and simply astounding.

So yes, Heath was brilliant and Oscar worthy, but he was not the only one putting out brilliant performances. Christian Bale seems to have been lost in the shuffle, because I have not heard much about him from anyone. He gives a great performance. Much sharper and into the character of Bruce Wayne than he was in Batman Begins. He has many scenes that remind me of the old cocky Bruce back in the old cartoons and first few films. Aaron Eckhart gives a wonderful performance as Harvey Dent/Two-Face. His transformation from one character to the next is not only written brilliantly, but executed brilliantly as well. As Dent, heís very sharp, does not seem like a little wimp under the radar because of the monstrous Joker and Batman. He makes the character hold his own and then transforms in unbelievably believable fashion. Michael Caine gives us another great performance as Alfred Pennyworth. I actually enjoyed him more in this than in Batman Begins. He gives us a few moments of comic relief (which worked throughout and didnít take away from the dark nature of the film) and also is involved in some very emotional and heart wrenching moments throughout. Maggie Gyllenhaal does a fantastic job of replacing Katie Holmes and does a much better job than Holmes. Maybe it is because the character is written a little bit differently, but Gyllenhaal seemed to make the character much more believable than Katie Holmesí portrayal in Begins. Gary Oldman gives a great performance as Lt. James Gordon soon to be Commissioner. He is much more involved than in Begins and doesnít just get more screen time for the sake of it, but also adds a lot to the story. Morgan Freeman is great as usual. So overall, the performances are simply brilliant all around. I donít remember the last time a film had so many knockout performances. Probably The Departed.

A problem in Batman Begins was that the action was sometimes hard to see. This problem is COMPLETELY fixed here and I could always tell what was going on, which made it much more enjoyable. All the action scenes are relevant to the story and are not just put there to take up time or satisfy the audience (although it definitely does that!) The sequences are filmed so perfectly. The cinematography perfect through each piece of action. Whether it was the bank robbery, the Joker chase, the Hong Kong sequence or any other action sequence. They were all done to perfection, very reminiscent of Heat.

The direction and cinematography is absolutely flawless. Nolan definitely took criticism the right way after some complaints from Batman Begins. Some of the most gorgeous shots I have seen in years take place right in this very film. Christopher Nolan does a splendid job and I give him mad props for this great accomplishment.

The screenplay was excellently written by Christopher Nolan and brother Johnathan. They move the story along at a brisk pace, while making sure every single detail is nailed to perfection. With all of this, they also manage to write BRILLIANT characters and come up with easily the best dialogue so far this year (even better than In Bruges if you can believe that). I will have to read the thing myself to really see the brilliance, but thereís no doubt that the screenplay had a hell of a lot to do with the astounding final product.

To go a bit more into the story, I was pleased with all of occurrences, twists, turns, revelations. There are a few badass twists that literally had the audience clapping and cheering. There are some very depressing, dark moments that had the audience sitting in their seat without a sound. The movie also does a great job of leading itself up to a very satisfying climax, and an ending which was next to perfect. I cannot remember a story so captivating, going outside the regulated box without going over the top. It never felt like there was too much going on or that there were too many characters who went underdeveloped ala Spider-Man 3. Besides maybe a minor flaw here and there, which are mostly just a few suspend your disbelief comic book flaws, the story is pretty much flawless.

So, I have pretty much gone into detail on all of the key points. Maybe not deep into storyline, because you all know what happened, or are going to know what happened, but I gave you a pretty fair summation of my thoughts. The Dark Knight is a massive improvement on Batman Begins, which is still a great film. Everything is just a few steps up. Acting, story, direction, action, screenplay etc. I am going to be blunt and flat-out say it. he Dark Knight is THE best comic book film ever made, it is by far the best film of the year, and is easily one of the best films of the decade.
What he said.
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  #8  
Old 07-20-2008, 06:13 AM

The Dark Knight - 9/10 or ****1/2/***** stars

I'm very excited right now, so please excuse me if this comes across as a rant instead of a "review." In 2005, after I saw Batman Begins, I thought I had just seen the comic book film to end all comic book films. The Dark Knight proved me wrong. Not only is this the best comic book film ever made, but it also ranks as one of the greatest, grittiest crime dramas ever made, right up there with Heat, L.A. Confidential, Goodfellas, Pulp Fiction, etc. Furthermore, The Dark Knight is the darkest, most adult comic book ever made as well.

Christopher Nolan's direction is outstanding. He seamlessly blends art and entertainment; he incorporates heavy drama, Shakespearian tragedy, intelligence, and provocative themes without forgetting about the popcorn fun that movie-goers crave every summer. With The Dark Knight, Nolan has completely redefined the comic book/superhero genre. The screenplay, which he co-wrote with his brother Jonathan, is intricate yet never confusing, engaging, and something Martin Scorsese or Michael Mann would savor reading.

The Dark Knight is a genuine ensemble piece -- one of the best ensemble pieces of all time, as far as I'm concerned -- and every single actor is excellent, but there's one actor who overshadows everyone else, who steals the show, and that actor is none other than the late Heath Ledger, a young, very talented, and promising star whose life ended far too early under tragic circumstances. Ledger's version of Batman's greatest nemesis, The Joker, is superior in every way imaginable than Jack Nicholson's take on the famous villain in Tim Burton's Batman. As The Joker, Ledger is psychotic, sadistic, insane, frightening, highly intelligent, unpredictable, and makes you laugh when you shouldn't. His performance is a tour de force, and it will be a shame if his tremendous work isn't rewarded with a posthumous Oscar nomination.

The Dark Knight is, without a doubt, an incredible motion picture, but it isn't without its flaws. I'd be willing to call the film "perfect" if not for a few things that slightly bothered me. Firstly, Nolan decides to bring back a certain character from Batman Begins for a brief cameo, but the character's appearance comes and goes without explanation and is rather pointless. Secondly, Harvey Dent's transformation into Two-Face occurs a bit too suddenly for my liking -- despite the rapidity of the transformation, Aaron Eckhart's career-best performance is absolutely convincing and invokes sympathy from the viewer. Thirdly and finally, the final showdown between Batman and The Joker isn't quite as epic as it should've been.

On the surface, The Dark Knight is a thrilling, action-packed summer blockbuster, but underneath, it's so much more, it's an unrelentingly dark and tragic morality play that deals with themes such as the fine line between good and evil, the negative effects fear, evil and chaos have on society, the consequences of being a hero, the struggle of holding onto your morals in an immoral world, etc. The Dark Knight is a brooding yet expertly made epic, and although it may not leave you with a smile on your face, it will linger in your memory for quite some time -- at least until you see it again.

Strider
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  #9  
Old 07-21-2008, 04:52 PM
The Dark Knight (SOILERS ALERT)

On the title I meant SPOILERS ALERT. Sorry.

I wasn't sure if I wanted to do a review on "The Dark Knight", because I knew that everyone else would, but I have to talk about it. First off, the acting was great. Christian Bale plays Batman/Bruce Wayne again in this sequel to "Batman Begins". He plays a fantastic Batman, and an even better Bruce Wayne. Maggie Gyllenhaal was great in the role of Rachel. Aaron Eckhart was a fantastic Harvey Dent, and a very sinister Two-Face. Gary Oldman played Commissioner Gordon fantastically once again. Michael Caine played an even better Alfred than he did on "Batman Begins". Morgan Freeman was Lucius Fox once again. But, it seemed like the only person people wanted to see in this film was Heath Ledger as the main villan, the Joker. Some people think that all the hype about him is just because he died, but let me tell you, he ruled the film. Heath's performance as the Joker was truly riveting, and even if he was still alive, he would still be just as acclaimed for this role.

The beginning of this film is fantastic and entertaining. In the opening scene, the Joker's henchmen are robbing a bank, and the Joker ordered each one to do a specific job, and then kill a certain henchman. Then the last one takes off his mask, and is the Joker himself. I love that it opened with the Joker, and didn't show how he became the Joker, nor did it refer to it very much. They just left that up to your imagination.

I also love that it showed how Harvey Dent became Two-Face, and that they did it in a very original way. The Two-Face effects were very disgusting and disturbing, but, they were also very original.

The entire film was very original, and I think that's what makes it so great. Even things that you have seen before are done in a way that you haven't seen before, which makes it very entertaining.

There were a few things that disappointed me though. First off, Rachel is killed off. I think this was unnecessary, but it worked with the story, and helped with the change from Harvey to Two-Face, so I'll let that one go. But, what I won't let go of is the death of Two-Face. Sure, his death saved the Commissioner's family, but maybe they could've used this in the third film (if there will be one), instead of killing him off half-an-hour after he was brought into the film. The third thing I didn't like is that the film ends with Batman being hunted down by the cops for being a vigilante. Now, I don't know about you, but I think that it would be a crappy sequel if the first half of the movie, Batman is running from cops. The last thing I didn't like is that Lucius Fox leaves Wayne Enterprises at the end. I thought he was a great character, and was the heart of Batman, by creating his gadgets.

But, this is all my opinion. You may think completely different. I think this was a great film, and is one exception for the rule that the original is better than the sequel.

Overall I give it 5 out of 5 stars.

R.I.P. Heath Ledger
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  #10  
Old 07-23-2008, 02:50 AM
Please do not post multiple threads. Look for reviews already posted on the same films before posting. Merging with the first "Dark Knight" thread.
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  #11  
Old 07-23-2008, 10:25 AM
Heath's performance was so good, that at times, I could really see underneath the make-up and tell that the Joker was just a very messed up guy.


10/10
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  #12  
Old 07-23-2008, 02:43 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tyler Durden4 View Post
Heath's performance was so good, that at times, I could really see underneath the make-up and tell that the Joker was just a very messed up guy.


10/10
Well said!!! You put a lot of thought into this!
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  #13  
Old 07-24-2008, 10:46 AM
Great film.Im not gonna restate them,but I agree w/t all of the above.

4/4,and coming from someone who isnt a Batman fan-boy.


Slaughter is the best medicine.
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  #14  
Old 07-25-2008, 08:41 AM
A spoiler-free review



(Christopher Nolan, 2008)

Hype is more often than not a very dangerous thing. Sure it raises awareness and, if done right, can translate into major success at the box office, but another thing it raises is expectations, and preemptively raised expectations can be one of the most dangerous things for a movie. When all we hear are good things about a certain movie months before it is even released, it’s very easy and inescapably inevitable that we will construct a certain vision of what we expect the movie to be, so when the movie turns out different from what we envisioned it to be, we are devastatingly disappointed, perhaps even more so than we would be if it was just a bad movie, without the hype. The advertising team for The Dark Knight did an incredible, creative, fascinating and encompassing job in raising awareness and preemptive hype for the film, which translated into it breaking a bucket load of box office records. But quite unlike the previous box office record holder, Spider-Man 3, whose release last summer was lead up to by a similarly encompassing advertising campaign and hype machine and which ended up being one of the most disappointing films of that year, The Dark Knight not only meets expectations and lives up to the hype but actually manages to surpass it.

It’s hard for me to refer to this movie in the context of the comic-book superhero movie genre, although it is clearly and by far the single greatest film in it – fact of the matter is, The Dark Knight transcends the genre. Most superhero films contain an inevitable fantasy element – even the other great superhero movies such as Spider-Man 2 or X2 feature a certain fantasy or sci-fi element in them. But with his take on the Batman franchise, director Christopher Nolan and the entire creative team have taken a cognitive and ingenious decision not only to make as realistic a film as possible, but also to actually root their films in the realism of our modern world. In these films there are no superpowers, freak occurrences, unexplained phenomena or fantasy elements of any kind, and any such concept that appeared in fantasy form in previous incarnations of Batman are explained by real-life vindications and abilities in Nolan’s Batman films. If anything, the whole realistic setting doesn’t make things easier for Nolan but rather harder, because he has to take special care to make sure that nothing bleeds over into the realm of camp. That it works so incredibly well is yet another testament to his talent.

From a technical standpoint the film is practically flawless. The cinematography by long-time Nolan collaborator Wally Pfister is absolutely brilliant – camera movements and set-ups are excellent and his use of natural lighting, especially in the many nighttime scenes, gives the film a very stylish feel while remaining completely true to the feeling of realism the film emulates. The action scenes are also incredible – well shot, conceived, and choreographed, it is truly a relief to see the film rely almost entirely on practical effects and stunts and not on CGI. In fact, as far as I could tell the film features barely any CGI, and even the elements that could have only possibly been created by a computer, such as the look of Two-Face, are completely unnoticeably integrated into the film. But what really caught me off guard isn’t the technical prowess of the film, but rather that The Dark Knight is fare more than a thick plot, powerful acting, great set pieces, fight scenes, and car chases – it transcends the label of simple entertainment by also serving as, of all things, an allegory.

Character development in the film is excellent, continuing the trend over from Batman Begins, which featured a fascinating portrayal of the character of Bruce Wayne and of exactly what led him to take on the Batman persona. We get further explorations of characters such as James Gordon and Harvey Dent, but the one character who is left a true mystery is the main antagonist, The Joker. Unlike the brilliant but entirely different interpretation of The Joker as he appeared in Tim Burton’s 1989 Batman film, The Dark Knight chooses not to explain anything about The Joker whatsoever – who he is, where he came from, why he is disfigured, why he chose the clown persona. None of this information is provided for us, which to me signaled that The Joker isn’t meant to be anybody specific.

As I see it, the character of The Joker in the film symbolizes a visceral, animalistic sense of evil and chaos that we as human beings all have within us – a sense of wanting to break the mold, to let loose, to do what we truly desire and not what is expected of us. Throughout the film, The Joker creates a series of situations in which he literally tests the morality and nature of various characters in Gotham City, be it the innocent citizens, police officers, and eventually, Batman and Harvey Dent as well. Some characters stand the test, while others give in to The Joker’s animalistic, violent urgings and become like him. I won’t go into the allegorical implications of the film’s eventual outcome in order to avoid spoilers, but I will divert attention to a particularly blatant use of symbolism in the film – a scene in which The Joker is seen with three attack dogs guarding him is, as I saw it, a pretty obvious reference to Cerberus, the three-headed dog who, in Greek mythology, was the guardian of Hades and the underworld.

Also, if we look at The Dark Knight taking into account the Francois Truffaut-advocated auteur theory of film, we can see that it contains a constituent in common with all of the other films Christopher Nolan has directed, and that is portrayal of characters caught in an ever-downward spiral of obsession. Like Leonard in Memento, Angier in The Prestige and Bruce Wayne in Batman Begins, The Dark Knight brings us two characters blindingly obsessed with something to the point of risking everything – Harvey Dent, who is obsessed with justice, control and putting the mob out of commission, and at his polar opposite The Joker, who is obsessed with destroying the system of control and instilling anarchy and chaos and truly seems not to care about anything else.

The acting in the film also deserves to be mentioned. Like Batman Begins, Nolan has collected an extremely impressive cast for The Dark Knight, losing wonderful assets such as Liam Neeson and Ken Watanabe but gaining equally talented talents in Heath Ledger, Aaron Eckhart and Maggie Gyllenhaal. The crossovers from Batman Begins are excellent as always – both Michael Caine and Morgan Freeman, who are undeniably talented actors and who pretty much consistently deliver good performances in their films, seem to have warmed up to their supporting roles, and Christian Bale is excellent and powerful as always in the title role, even if he isn’t the main attraction this time around. Gary Oldman, who also appeared in Batman Begins, has a substantially meatier role this time around and is brilliant as always, completely disappearing behind the accent and playing a genuinely, purely good character, quite unlike the antagonistic characters he has played many times before. Aaron Eckhart, one of the most underrated actors who was absolutely brilliant in movies like Erin Brockovich, Conversations with Other Women and Thank You For Smoking (but not so much in The Core and Paycheck), delivers some of his best work yet with the perhaps-too-devoted Harvey Dent, whose obsession with doing the right thing ends up costing him quite a lot. It’s a subtle, skillful performance that gets a little showier in the third act but which remains down to earth for the most part.

And then, there’s Heath Ledger, whose performance is just so incredible, so effective, so unbelievably superior it deserves its own paragraph. Like Johnny Depp in Pirates of the Caribbean, I’m sure that there will be a horde of Heath Ledger converts won over by his portrayal as The Joker. I myself have been a fan since his intense, fantastic, visceral, Oscar-nominated performance in Brokeback Mountain, and have snice then enjoyed him in The Brothers Grimm, I’m Not There, and in retrospect, Monster’s Ball. But his portrayal of The Joker surpasses everything he’s ever done – he is engulfed, swallowed by the raw, animalistic nature of The Joker, allowing it to consume him and his performance. Ledger’s Joker is completely off the hook – every move is unexpected and unanticipated, and every scene he is in benefits from an eerie, otherworldly creepiness like you have a gut feeling that anything could go wrong with this guy at any given moment. Ledger has managed to create a character that can effortlessly create tension and instill fear. It’s a downright frightening performance and the pinnacle of his career both financially and in terms of skill, which makes the fact that it’s also the end of his career even more tragic. After viewing the movie, I wish now more than ever that Heath were still alive, not only so that we could continue enjoying a hopefully very long career of wonderful, skillful performances, but also so that he himself could enjoy the success of The Dark Knight. It’s certainly something to be proud of.

It’s easy, and entirely true, to say that The Dark Knight is the best superhero comic-book adaptation movie of all time, but really it’s so much more than that. Rooted in reality, the film is more like a really, really good, epic crime-drama that just happens to feature a main character who wears a bat suit and a villain who dresses up like a clown. The movie transcends the comic-book feel and mentality and enters a higher realm. It’s technical virtuoso, incredibly well crafted action set pieces, exquisite direction and impeccable acting work well enough, but are elevated when integrated with the film’s fascinating, deep, resonant message about human nature and morals. Laden with symbolism and allegorical messages, The Dark Knight is far more than just a superhero movie, and is the best movie of 2008 so far and definitely the best of the summer.

RATING: 9/10.
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  #15  
Old 07-25-2008, 11:29 AM
The Dark Knight (Christopher Nolan, 2008)



Amazing. I'm basically repeating what everyone else has said but that was frickin epic, I really didn't expect it to 'transcend the genre' as Monotreme said and become an intense crime thriller as well as a superhero movie. All performances are perfect but kudos to Ledger who devoted himself to showing us a character totally unlike any of the others he has played and to Oldman, who had more to do this time around and really made the most of it. Nolan's direction and Pfister's photography both suited the movie's high-tension style and the screenplay was great too. What I also liked was how the movie reflected the so-called 'war on terror' at various points and how it explored the nature of good and evil in society. Cannot wait to see what they do with the third; best movie of the year so far.

9/10
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  #16  
Old 07-25-2008, 03:59 PM
Once again . . . great review Monotreme.


(Did this thread get moved into the same forum?)

Last edited by bigred760; 07-25-2008 at 04:01 PM..
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  #17  
Old 07-25-2008, 05:50 PM
Dark Knight

Well right off the bat, Chris Nolan has certainly improved on Batman Begins. What was a long, sometimes ponderous buildup to a handful of cool Bat-moments in the first one, is now a fire-on-all-cylinders right off the bat action epic. One thing that struck me watching it was just how COMPLEX the story is, how it's not just good vs. evil but has all kinds of morality issues at different points for different characters. This is both a fault and a benefit: It's NOT better than Burton's 89 Batman because Burton kept things focused and simple and let Batman and Joker carry the show with their multitude of psychotic quirks. On the other hand, it IS more intelligent and mature than most of the Marvel Movie drivel we've endured over the last few years, while not forgetting to include the cool stuff as well. However, there are times where the editing is not up to snuff and the pacing is overdone, choosing not to show us and follow up on things that have been set up in a scene (why CAN'T we see Joker overpower that cop in the interrogation room? Or what happens after Batman rescues Rachel at the fundraiser?? Did Joker mess with any of the other high society types or did he just turn around and leave???). And then there are the performances: Bale still refuses to play the part of Wayne/Batman showing the instability one would suffer to live such a life as Keaton did, but still has the presence to pull it off nicely; Caine brings his acting chops to the table yet again, despite how seemingly useless Alfred comes across at times, barely lifting a finger to help in his crusade but always there to lend a sympathetic ear; Oldman is vastly improved from his glorified sidekick role in Begins, giving us a Gordon for the ages that is smart, tough, cool, and sympathetic, easily the biggest surprise of the film; Gyllenhaal tries her best to replace the more attractive Katie Holmes, and serves her plot functions well; and Freeman brings some levity to the affair as the real brains behind Wayne's mission, bringing smoothness and good humor to the film when it needs it most. The top-notch supporting cast features everyone from Eric Roberts to Michael Jai White to Anthony Michael Hall to Tiny "Zeus" Lister (best one-scene bit in the film), and it's a good thing to see. Finally there are the main villains, who in essence make the film: Eckhart as Two-Face / Harvey Dent gives the performance of his career, taking me off-guard with the depth and decency he brings to Dent, then making me shudder and wince as Two-Face without ever making me lose any empathy for him as a character. Truly a work of beauty from a guy mostly known for pretty-boy roles; FINALLY, there is Ledger, owning the screen every time he's on and burying almost all memories of Nicholson for eternity. The Joker is smartly portrayed as a crazed anarchist who knows how to manipulate people, whether they be mob bosses or paranoid schizos, and Ledger brings the heat like never before in his cut-short career. Basically, the Academy should just engrave his Oscar now before finally getting around to opening the envelope come February. In closing, let me just say that the most succinct thing that Nolan brings to the table is in showing the absolute HELL that someone even with the resources of Bruce Wayne must go thru on a daily basis to maintain the lifestyle of being Batman, whether it be physical, emotional, or spiritual, and that level of intelligence certainly makes it better (and more realistic) than a "fun" film like say, Iron Man...

9/10
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  #18  
Old 07-25-2008, 08:10 PM
Nice post JJ and welcome back.
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  #19  
Old 07-26-2008, 06:32 AM
There were a few things that disappointed me though. First off, Rachel is killed off. I think this was unnecessary, but it worked with the story, and helped with the change from Harvey to Two-Face, so I'll let that one go. But, what I won't let go of is the death of Two-Face. Sure, his death saved the Commissioner's family, but maybe they could've used this in the third film (if there will be one), instead of killing him off half-an-hour after he was brought into the film. The third thing I didn't like is that the film ends with Batman being hunted down by the cops for being a vigilante. Now, I don't know about you, but I think that it would be a crappy sequel if the first half of the movie, Batman is running from cops. The last thing I didn't like is that Lucius Fox leaves Wayne Enterprises at the end. I thought he was a great character, and was the heart of Batman, by creating his gadgets.

Your not very smart are you? Maybe you should go watch the movie again. Harvey is not dead. Gordon lied about him dying. Gordon lied about he himself dying so why do you think harvey is dead? Also lucious is not going anywhere the computer is gone so he doesn't have to quit. Thats why when batman says people faith should be rewarded the he enters his name and the computer blows and and he smiles cause he know bruce never intended to keep thus he will be in the next movie.
As for batman being hunted umm he's is breaking the law being batman he choose to take the rap for everything two face did so the joker didn't win. Batman was always chased in the comic books. And now this sets up how is he going to keep being batman with both the cops and the bad guys looking for him. This is probably the sole reason Nolen will be back. For this story. please watch the film again as I don't think you got all of it the first time.
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  #20  
Old 07-26-2008, 06:01 PM
8/10 on first viewing

10/10 on second viewing

For all you people who found the film to be "messy" in its first half I'd recommend you to watch the film again - it makes a lot more sense the second time around. It just feels more coherent. In fact, the structure is very tight, and made me think of the great screenplay to LA Confidential.

Ledger's scenes are just so memorable and suspenseful, especially when he confronts Rachel and you hear that eerie music building up- that's movie magic for me. And the interrogation scene -wow...

I saw it for the second time today in a packed auditorium of 380 people and there were at least three loud collective gasps. And applause during the credits which rarely happens here in Sweden.
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  #21  
Old 07-26-2008, 06:17 PM
I also love how the Joker turns out to be like Moriarty - even though he is a total sociopath he outsmarts Batman and the rest (escaping prison and freeing Lau). The Joker forces Batman to truly become the Dark Knight.

But in the end, as Batman rides the batpod into the horzion he becomes not the Batman of Bob Kane but that of Frank Miller. And that's the Batman I always wanted to see on the big screen. And now I have...

Last edited by Derrida; 07-26-2008 at 06:26 PM..
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  #22  
Old 07-26-2008, 08:18 PM
10/10
I really liked The Dark Night. Best movie I've seen in a long time.
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  #23  
Old 08-06-2008, 10:53 AM


The Dark Knight (Nolan, 2008) - RATING: 9/10

Ever since their creation, our perception of certain superheroes has always been in a near constant state of flux; from their light-hearted origins in 1940ís Ė 60ís comic books to their more mature, realistic, and even darker presentations in films and graphic novels. And yet, one can easily say that no other fantastical, heroic icon has undergone such an immense metamorphosis as Batman has. We have seen him as the subject of several campy serials, as a clean-cut and philanthropic do-gooder, a jaded millionaire, a mysterious recluse, and most of all, a brooding avenger consumed by a traumatic past and a profound inner turmoil. Thereís no question that the Batman legacy has continued to darken and mature more and more with each and every take of the character as heís pulled down further and further into a more hard-edged, gritty, and realistic depiction that has ultimately defined his universe as an epic arc of a growling complex hero.

In 2005, writer/director Christopher Nolan conceived what may as well become known as the ultimate and definitive depiction of Batman in all of his facets, complexities, and humanity with Batman Begins. The film was meticulously crafted and even groundbreaking effort to the comic-book genre, as it provided a scope and understanding towards the character that was so immense; one couldnít help but be immersed in the utter believability and humanity of it all. It was a rare feat of a summer blockbuster that pushed the limits of just how far a comic book movie can go, ranging from admirably taut storytelling and even to some engaging philosophies. But if Nolan upped the ante to unprecedented success with Batman Begins then he has done the impossible and has not only crafted a sequel that is better, deeper, and more epic on every level, but has also managed to view Batman in a way that is so realistically conceived and so tautly wounded in themes, philosophies and dynamics, his universe canít help but levitate from being a work of popular culture and popcorn entertainment to being a meticulously crafted piece of storytelling that excels into the realms of art.

It is absolutely mind-boggling to see the multitude of levels that The Dark Knight is capable of working on. The film certainly continues its predecessorís role as a well-rounded character study and as a hell of a comic-book thrill ride, but all of the admiration this time around comes within its uncanny capacity as a grandiose crime epic, be it technically, thematically, or in scope. Nolan has been noted to say that he drew plentiful inspiration from Michael Mannís Heat, an influence that serves up a nihilistic, hard-edged atmosphere straight from the get-go. From the opening scenes we are immediately pulled into this uncanny force of nihilism and unpredictable chaos, a visceral force of nature that can only be unleashed by one of the filmís most ballasting components: The Joker.

Starting off with a bank-robbery and then later divulging into macabre crimes that could only be committed by the clown prince of crime himself, the film certainly has all the basic workings of a crime epic nailed down right from its first act. The theme of duality and the unbreakable and especially explosive tension between good, evil, and everything in between is constantly present with The Jokerís driving principles of anarchy and chaos constantly pushing his environment into the realm of madness and Batman trying to obtain order and justice to the best of his ability. With glaring rays of goodness in the likes of Batman, the good-hearted Lieutenant James Gordon, and the Gotham cityís new hope in noble District Attorney Harvey Dent, the blazing lines between good and evil and order and chaos could not be any more distinct. And yet, the crux of the film canít help but lie within the fading vitality of those crucial boundaries.

Moral ambiguities are predicaments that always find themselves harvesting within the films of Christopher Nolan, be it Leonard Shelby and his search for ďjusticeĒ against his wifeís killer or the limits two magicians are willing to surpass in order to achieve supremacy. Nolan, who The Dark Knightís script with the help of his brother Jonathan, could not have honed this frequent dynamic of storytelling to more pitch-perfection here. As The Jokerís animalistic nature and id-driven actions lure the city of Gotham into a hellish mess of anarchy, it festers into the central characters as well. This descent of morality and sense of lost virtue only begin the aching of a tragedy, and a grand one at that. Itís a tragedy that delves into the depths of the striving, yearning, and personal principals that drive us to do good and the tragedies, losses, and lusts that drive us into the realms of our most evil nature. How could Batman not turn into a desperate vigilante with a lust for vengeance without his ascendant self-discipline? How could such a bright and noble figure like Harvey Dent be driven into his own self-depravity without having to suffer an excruciating loss?

The character development bodied forth by the dense screenplay certainly contributes to the heavily affective character dynamics, but itís the knockout performances that truly bring everything to life and ignite our sympathy. This time around, we ignore the whole character study routine and are given the much broader and more affective scope of a true ensemble piece. Everyone merely has equal amount of screen time and everyone is given their chance to shine, whether itís veterans in the likes of Michael Caine and Gary Oldman getting bigger parts or newcomers like Maggie Gyllenhall and Aaron Eckhart being able to take the spotlight for a while and deliver a truly lasting impression. The performances given here are absolutely grandiose in sympathy and emotionality and, especially in the cases of Bale and Eckhart, driven with stellar complexities. But one sole performance remains as the most sublime and ascendant.

It would be ultimately unjust to describe Heath Ledgerís performance as The Joker with words. Heís riveting, disturbing, twisted, scary, darkly humorous, and unforgettable. But all of those words remain unparalleled to the emotions one experiences when watching him onscreen. Itís the raw, visceral, animalistic, and just uncanny deliverance that Ledger delivered with such pitch-perfection that makes his role so breathtakingly intriguing and, sadly, tragic. Talk about a posthumous Oscar is already being ignited, and it has every right to. Ledgerís work here is a sublime testament to the grand talent that he was and to his immense bravery when diving into a character.

To call The Dark Knight nothing more than a summer comic-book movie would be a near insult. The film is a provocative and meticulously crafted piece of storytelling that and is on par with some of the great crime epics. As an action film itís exciting and tautly staged, as an ensemble piece itís stellar in deliverance, and as a tragic depiction of good and evil it excels into Shakespearean depths. Thereís no telling how Christopher Nolan can make the knot even tauter with a forthcoming installment, because what he has here is a true gem not only of pop culture flare and popcorn entertainment, but of truly artistic storytelling as well.
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  #24  
Old 08-06-2008, 01:14 PM

The Dark Knight (Christopher Nolan, 2008) - RATING: 10/10

Where do I begin? The Dark Knight is a rich film crafted and created by the very underrated director Christopher Nolan and written by his brother Johnathan Nolan. The film is very dark, darker than any other comic book film has gone, but that doesn't mean thats a bad thing. In fact its one of the best qualities of the film, besides its complex storyline and amazing cast. First theres Heath Ledger, everyone is born for some purpose and Heath's was to play the Joker, every time he came on screen he stole the entire scene. Every word that is said out of his mouth is unforgettable and tantalizing. It will make you wish he had more screen time, he deserves every award he better become nominated for because its much deserved. It is the best villain to be on the screen, he's sadistic, psychotic, an agent of chaos, and a man without rules. With each story he tells his victims, you won't no whether to feel sorry for him or be terrified by each deep and depressing story he feels so honest about telling. His chemistry with Batman and ever character he comes into contact with is so natural the movie feels real. It's really unfortunate that he can not come back to reprise his role as the menacing villain. Next is Christian Bale who plays The Dark Knight, he has really gotten use to the costume and does it better than ever, putting fear into the Gotham underworld, unfortunately he is also the reason why things have become so bad. His fighting scenes with Joker and emotional scenes with Two-Face are epic and ground breaking. Finally you have Harvey Dent, the white knight of Gotham City, who symbolizes the path of hope and freedom (similar to Barack Obama) you see this man's great rise to fame and power and you also see how he loses everything, including the love of his life as well as his belief in justice. When you see his fall from a noble District Attorney to the villainous Two-Face you can only feel sorry for him. The action scenes are amazing in this scene because they use very little CGI which make them more believable which allow you to become more engaged in the full experience. Every person plays their role, no one is useless or shortly used. It really is a complete story with a beginning, middle, and an end. Don't expect there to be a sequel because it ends with no real purpose for a sequel to even be required or needed. This film will make you question yourself and how we all have a darker side to us, one that could easily take over us just by adding a little chaos in the mix. The score just adds to the beauty of the film, playing at the right moments and never over done. One that stands out the most is "Why So Serious?" which is Joker's theme. Similar to the Jaws theme, this theme cranks up every time you know the Joker is near or about to do something. There are minor issues that can be easily overlooked, and thats what sets this film above the hype. It delivers where most blockbusters don't, a compelling story, great action, and a cast that brings something one of a kind to each character they play. The Dark Knight owns 2008 and all comic-book films.
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  #25  
Old 08-07-2008, 12:43 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jig Saw 123 View Post
The score just adds to the beauty of the film, playing at the right moments and never over done. One that stands out the most is "Why So Serious?" which is Joker's theme. Similar to the Jaws theme, this theme cranks up every time you know the Joker is near or about to do something.
You're right on with the score, and Joker's in particular. They were playing it before the movie started when I went to see it again in IMAX the other night. Talk about hair-raising stuff, but in a good way. To me that stark, atonal musical motif for the Joker just perfectly represents primal fear.
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  #26  
Old 09-10-2008, 02:09 PM
Without a doubt the best film of the year and one of the greatest films that I have seen in a long time. Heath Ledger put Jack Nicholson's Joker to shame with his utterly brilliant performance. A well deserved Oscar should be in store for this man. Bravo Mr. Ledger, you will be sadly missed buddy!!!!

10/10!!!!!!!
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  #27  
Old 09-15-2008, 06:14 AM
Gay Cowboy + Clown = WOW

The Dark Knight has done very well at the box office. Which is nice to see.

Had a tad of doubt about this film. I must have been one of the only people who slept through Batman Begins. Twice! Batman Begins was rushed and ugly. The action scenes were too manic. The scarecrow character was pointless. And i found the whole experience damn right shit.

But the Dark Knight was very good indeed. A few gripes, but overall an enjoyable crime caper. The Joker stole the show. An awesome/unforgettable piece of acting. Harvey Dents' face was a nice surprise. But the overall winner of the movie was the sound and score. It absolutely made the tension. As well as being well composed it was used with the movie perfectly. A 1st class job.

The script had some high points and was well polished.

Didn't understand a word Batman said. And how he could love that ugly chick so much. She wasn't a nice sight on a normal cinema screen, let alone IMAX.

Tried the pencil trick on my girlfriend. She's dead now.

i'll give Batman 8/10
a vast improvement over the 1st.

Last edited by Hotbox; 09-16-2008 at 05:41 AM..
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  #28  
Old 09-29-2008, 10:22 PM
what an awesome movie!
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  #29  
Old 12-05-2008, 10:21 AM

The Dark Knight, wasn't quite as dark as The Killing Joke or Batman: Year One, but about as dark as we're likely to get from a movie oppressed by the need to get money from kids. More importantly it was the most entertaining Batman film so far, and one of the all-time great action films. 10/10.
  • Favourite scenes:
  • * Batman interrogating the Joker.
  • * Batman confronts Two-Face.
  • * Joker's meeting with the various mob bosses.
  • * Joker's "why so serious?" to Gambol.
  • * The bank robbery.
  • * The main chase sequence.

The film was the ultimate blockbuster. It had chases. It had shootouts. It had explosions. It had everything a blockbuster should offer.

If there's one criticism I have it's the appearance of Gotham, its a tad on the clean side; I like my Gotham graffiti ridden and oozing with sleaze. Where were the strip clubs, and trashy hookers loitering?. Maybe in a third?


Last edited by Leonidas.300; 12-08-2008 at 11:14 AM..
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  #30  
Old 12-17-2008, 03:09 AM
The Dark Knight

The Dark Knight (2008)

It's a rare thing when a sequel manages to top the original. The best examples I can think of where this has happened are with Terminator 2, and in other peoples' opinions, The Godfather Part 2. What Christopher Nolan has done here is to take his own image of the infamous caped crusader Batman, which he started in "Batman Begins," and show us what a superhero movie can truly be.

Taking place not long after "Batman Begins," there is a newly-appointed District Attorney, Harvey Dent (Aaron Eckhart), who has vowed to clean up the city. Our hero, Batman/Bruce Wayne (Christian Bale) is, of course, still around fighting crime. A new criminal mastermind known as The Joker (Heath Ledger) has made his presence known through several bank robberies and murders. Batman must team up with the new D.A and Lieutenant Jim Gordon (Gary Oldman) to stop The Joker from spreading anarchy throughout Gotham City.

After director Joel Schumacher nearly sent the whole Batman franchise down the toilet with the "decent" "Batman Forever" and the awful "Batman and Robin," Christopher Nolan came along and added exactly what the franchise had been lacking all along: realism. I love Tim Burton's original 1989 Batman and thought "Batman Returns" was decent, but the recurring problem in both of them was the setting. Burton's Batman films both seemed like they were happening in some medieval city from the look of the architectural designs. Nolan's first bit of revision for the franchise was something very simple: film Gotham City in a real city, in this case, Chicago.

I've got to hand it to the entire cast. They did an amazing job in bringing all of these characters to the screen. Christian Bale continues where he left off in "Begins" with his more realistic portrayal of Bruce Wayne and Batman. With Bale's performance, we get the sense of a tortured soul, who's fighting crime while also trying to deal with a love life. This aspect of the character never really came through before. Michael Keaton sort of showed this, though not very much and we were certainly not going to be able to get that impression with Val Kilmer or George Clooney.

Maggie Gylllenhaal was certainly an improvement over Katie Holmes for the character of Rachel Dawes, a character who knows the true identity of Batman, but must keep it a secret and at the same time is dating Harvey Dent becuase Bruce is too obsessed with his alter ego.

Aaron Eckhart must also be given credit for a great portrayal of Harvey Dent/Two Face. When I heard that he was first rumored for the part, I had just recently seen "Thank You For Smoking." That was all the convincing I needed to know that he was the perfect man for the role. Also continuing their amazing roles are Sir Michael Caine as Alfred and Gary Oldman as Jim Gordon.

But let's face it. The star of this movie is the late Heath Ledger as The Joker. You can certainly look forward to Ledger getting a posthumous Oscar nomination for this role, and hopefully, the Oscar itself. This would only be the second time in Oscar history that a posthumous Oscar has been awarded, with the first one going to Peter Finch for his outstanding performance in "Network."

I was rather curious when I first heard that Heath Ledger had landed this role. The only previous films that I had seen with him in it were "A Knight's Tale," "The Brothers Grimm," and "Brokeback Mountain." While I didn't really care for "Brokeback" or "Grimm," I was incredibly surprised by his performance in "A Knight's Tale," so I really started looking forward to seeing Ledger take on The Joker. I had heard that Nolan chose him for the role becuase he was "fearless," and that aspect comes through quite clear in his performance.

Heath Ledger plays The Joker as a psychopathic clown with no morals, no code, and no rules. Looking at Ledger's previous performances and comparing it to this one, he completely loses himself in this character. There is not the slightest hint of Ledger when his character is on screen. If I didn't know that it was Ledger, I never would have begun to guess that it was him and it's not because of the amazing makeup, but because of his amazing skills as an actor.

The way he plays The Joker seems to be more true to the way the character was originally intended. Ledger was given a copy of Alan Moore's graphic novel "The Killing Joke" as his only inspiration for the character. From reading that novel, we can certainly get a good sense of where Ledger was coming from when creating his version of the character. As the rest of the story goes, Ledger locked himself away in a hotel room for several weeks, working on the voice and personality of the character. What he came up with was absolutely brilliant: A whiny voice attached to a character whose only wish is to create anarchy.

I love Jack Nicholson's portrayal of the Joker too, but it gets overshadowed by Ledger's. Nicholson actually played the character as a joking clown and never really came off as menacing in any way. He even had the gun that shot out a little flag that said "bang." What was also interesting when comparing the two films is that Burton's decided to include the whole back story of how The Joker was created by falling into a vat of chemicals, while Nolan decided to completely leave off the back story. This creates an extra layer of mystery around the character and makes him even creepier.

The screenplay by Christopher Nolan and his brother Jonathan Nolan is absolutely amazing. It takes real genius to be able to weave together so many different storylines of so many different characters while giving them all enough time to develop. Somehow the Nolans have managed to pull this off. Each character has their important scenes allowing us to find out about them and actually care about them. But it also doesn't overuse characters. Having villains as great as The Joker and Two Face could lead to a temptation to use those characters a lot, but the Nolans use them just enough and only when they are really needed.

"Batman Begins" was a great film as well, but the main problem I had with that film was the villain. Ra's Al Ghul never came off as threatening at all, though Liam Neeson does what he can with the role. However, "Begins" was merely a starting point. Nolan uses it to not only establish Batman as a character, but also uses it to establish his own Batman universe. His Batman universe is much darker than we have ever seen it, with Batman being equally dark. This darkness of Nolan's vision adds more to the realism that he created with his universe whereas, with the Schumacher films, Gotham had almost become a more playful, lighter place.

It'll be interesting to see where a third film would go. I've heard recent rumors of Nolan working on some rough outlines, but he doesn't really like much of what he's come up with so far. It will be an incredibly tough job considering what happens at the end of this film coupled with the tragic loss of Heath Ledger. I have heard that they don't plan to replace Ledger, which I think is for the best because it just wouldn't be the same. I just don't think anybody could match what he accomplished here. I think the Nolans' best bet would be to move on to another villain or, if a certain someone didn't truly die at the end of this film as there is strong reason to believe, they could always use them again. My only hope is that the Nolans take their time in writing the next story and if it is even half as good as this one was, then we can all prepare to be blown away yet again. 4/4 stars.
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