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  #1561  
Old 06-30-2010, 11:49 AM


The Road - 10/10
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  #1562  
Old 07-02-2010, 01:49 AM
Motherless Brooklyn by Jonathan Lethem

I liked it a whole lot. The protagonist is consistently interesting, and seeing the plot and the world through his Tourettic eyes is fascinating and affecting. Lethem also has a hell of a way with language and wordplay, a skill which did wonders for this novel, which could've come off so gimmicky and cheap. I'm wondering whatever happened with that adaptation Ed Norton wanted to do, because though I'm against setting it in the 1950s like I've heard he wants to do (defeats the purpose just a teeny bit), I just know Norton could nail this role like a motherfucker. Recommended.
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  #1563  
Old 07-02-2010, 07:23 AM

Dead Until Dark by Charlaine Harris
8/10
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  #1564  
Old 07-02-2010, 04:26 PM

Florida Roadkill
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  #1565  
Old 07-03-2010, 02:15 PM
V For Vendetta (Alan Moore and David Lloyd, 1989)



Absolutely brilliant, I may even prefer it to Watchmen, which would be saying something.
10/10
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  #1566  
Old 07-04-2010, 02:00 PM


3/5
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  #1567  
Old 07-07-2010, 10:01 PM

7/10
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  #1568  
Old 07-09-2010, 12:00 AM
Finished Moby Dick earlier today. It certainly lived up to its reputation. It's also a lot to absorb. It's long, dense, incredibly strange both in form and content, filled with biblical allusions and language and layers of religious allegory, but despite that it's pretty infinitely interpretable. Each chapter is almost like a miniature essay, covering a vast array of topics (though most are directly or indirectly related to whales and whaling). Analysis of any one aspect of the book could fill a whole other book, and I'm sure they have many times over. I'm happy to have read it. It was worth the effort.
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  #1569  
Old 07-09-2010, 12:22 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Powerslave View Post
Finished Moby Dick earlier today. It certainly lived up to its reputation. It's also a lot to absorb. It's long, dense, incredibly strange both in form and content, filled with biblical allusions and language and layers of religious allegory, but despite that it's pretty infinitely interpretable. Each chapter is almost like a miniature essay, covering a vast array of topics (though most are directly or indirectly related to whales and whaling). Analysis of any one aspect of the book could fill a whole other book, and I'm sure they have many times over. I'm happy to have read it. It was worth the effort.
I'm glad you enjoyed it. For me, it was one of the most tortuous novels I've ever come across in my entire life.

However, seeing you loved Confederacy of Dunces, I am most likely NOT the proper audience to make my opinions affix to what you may enjoy (I only never finished about 4 books of the hundreds I've read. One was "Dunces").


Just out of curiousity, I'd like to ask if you've read these because you might love them:

The Scarlett Letter

Stranger in a Strange Land (this is a special book for me. With about 100 pages to go, I threw it against the wall. The only other book I threw against the wall was THE DA VINCI CODE - but I had finished reading it.)

Brave New World


- I'm sure you've read these, but I recommend them lol
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  #1570  
Old 07-10-2010, 05:24 PM
I've heard that from a lot of people in regards to Moby Dick. Lots of people I know started it and never finished it, or suffered through it. I completely understand it. I mean, it's hardly a pageturner. The enormous runs of encyclopedic rambling about every aspect of whales, whaling, whaling history, whaling biology, the whaling industry, whaling ships and the various parts of whaling ships, and on and on and on, of course that will bore a lot of people. Personally, I dug it, I found it interesting, as I have an interest in whales which I partially why I bothered with the book in the first place and stuck with it 'til the end, but I still understand how boring that would be for lots of (most?) people. The rambling nature of the narrative I would think also contributes to that, but I dug that too - it gave the impression of Ishmael as this sort of distracted guy, fascinated with everything and prone to tangents, and his presence as the narrator is also interesting to me, since he just sort of disappears from the scene completely for long periods of time, despite ostensibly being the guy telling the story. And so on, I could keep rambling about this book for a long time, but I'll refrain for everyone's sake. But yeah, though I loved it, I certainly understand hating it too.

Also worth mentioning: I started Moby Dick last summer, and read like 350 pages of it, then over the school year read off and on while reading several other books, then just finally finished it now, almost a year later. I'm sure spacing it out like that helped. The book is just too damn tiring.

Ah, that's too bad that you didn't like Dunces. Though I could see someone not liking that too, though for different reasons. Was it the main character? One of my good friends hated/didn't finish it just because he couldn't stand Ignatius. I can get that, though I personally think he's a great character.

Out of those three, I've actually only read the Scarlet Letter, in sophomore year of high school. I didn't like it. I didn't hate it, I liked certain things about it, but I think it's just ill-suited for 10th graders. For that matter, I don't think I've ever actually met anyone that liked the Scarlet Letter. It's one these books that everyone's made to read in high school, while simultaneously being a book that your average high school student just isn't gonna like. At least from my experience. I've never understood why they insist on assigning it. I mean, I can appreciate it, and I think if I read it again now, I'm sure I would get something more out of it. It would take a lot of willpower to get myself to do that, but I think if I ever did I'd like it more than I did the first time around.

It's funny though, since Melville admired Hawthorne and the Scarlet Letter more than anything else, and dedicated Moby Dick to Hawthorne. Funny stuff.

Brave New World I've never gotten around to reading because I already read 1984 and it just feels like reading the former'd feel redundant. So I just haven't yet bothered. I'd certainly like to someday though.

Stranger in a Strange Land is one I've always wanted to read. I read Starship Troopers a while back and liked that a lot, and Stranger seems to get lots of praise, always being touted as such a classic, so I've always been curious, but nah, never have.
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  #1571  
Old 07-10-2010, 08:07 PM
Archie Meets the Punisher

What the fuck? What the fucking fuck?
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  #1572  
Old 07-10-2010, 09:21 PM

The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien
10/10
Still as magical and wondrous as when I first read it in my childhood. It was my first book report.
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  #1573  
Old 07-10-2010, 11:54 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Powerslave View Post
I've heard that from a lot of people in regards to Moby Dick. Lots of people I know started it and never finished it, or suffered through it. I completely understand it. I mean, it's hardly a pageturner. The enormous runs of encyclopedic rambling about every aspect of whales, whaling, whaling history, whaling biology, the whaling industry, whaling ships and the various parts of whaling ships, and on and on and on, of course that will bore a lot of people. Personally, I dug it, I found it interesting, as I have an interest in whales which I partially why I bothered with the book in the first place and stuck with it 'til the end, but I still understand how boring that would be for lots of (most?) people. The rambling nature of the narrative I would think also contributes to that, but I dug that too - it gave the impression of Ishmael as this sort of distracted guy, fascinated with everything and prone to tangents, and his presence as the narrator is also interesting to me, since he just sort of disappears from the scene completely for long periods of time, despite ostensibly being the guy telling the story. And so on, I could keep rambling about this book for a long time, but I'll refrain for everyone's sake. But yeah, though I loved it, I certainly understand hating it too.

Also worth mentioning: I started Moby Dick last summer, and read like 350 pages of it, then over the school year read off and on while reading several other books, then just finally finished it now, almost a year later. I'm sure spacing it out like that helped. The book is just too damn tiring.

Ah, that's too bad that you didn't like Dunces. Though I could see someone not liking that too, though for different reasons. Was it the main character? One of my good friends hated/didn't finish it just because he couldn't stand Ignatius. I can get that, though I personally think he's a great character.

Out of those three, I've actually only read the Scarlet Letter, in sophomore year of high school. I didn't like it. I didn't hate it, I liked certain things about it, but I think it's just ill-suited for 10th graders. For that matter, I don't think I've ever actually met anyone that liked the Scarlet Letter. It's one these books that everyone's made to read in high school, while simultaneously being a book that your average high school student just isn't gonna like. At least from my experience. I've never understood why they insist on assigning it. I mean, I can appreciate it, and I think if I read it again now, I'm sure I would get something more out of it. It would take a lot of willpower to get myself to do that, but I think if I ever did I'd like it more than I did the first time around.

It's funny though, since Melville admired Hawthorne and the Scarlet Letter more than anything else, and dedicated Moby Dick to Hawthorne. Funny stuff.

Brave New World I've never gotten around to reading because I already read 1984 and it just feels like reading the former'd feel redundant. So I just haven't yet bothered. I'd certainly like to someday though.

Stranger in a Strange Land is one I've always wanted to read. I read Starship Troopers a while back and liked that a lot, and Stranger seems to get lots of praise, always being touted as such a classic, so I've always been curious, but nah, never have.

I think that if I read Moby Dick over a year, it would have been much more bearable. It took me about a month, and yeah... it's just wayyy too much to try and digest, let alone "enjoy".

Ah, you didn't like Scarlett Letter. I don't remember what my other classmates though of it. It was the first book I never finished reading. In fact, for the report in my Advanced Composition class, I admitted that I didn't finish it and talked about how much I hated it. My teacher gave me a "C+" for honesty.

If you've already read 1984 then yes, Brave New World is rather redundant. That's probably partly why I was never able to finish it.

Stranger in a Strange Land... it's one of those books that everybody loves, but I have no idea why I don't. I KNOW why I don't like it, but I find it odd that so many others think great things about this book, when those praises are the same things that I hate about it hahaha.
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  #1574  
Old 07-11-2010, 07:09 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by KcMsterpce View Post
Stranger in a Strange Land... it's one of those books that everybody loves, but I have no idea why I don't. I KNOW why I don't like it, but I find it odd that so many others think great things about this book, when those praises are the same things that I hate about it hahaha.
For me, I prefer when Heinlein (much like Philip K. Dick) writes shorter books and short stories. Both writers are just much better when they present their ideas, have a quick and great story, and don't burden it with a laborious plot.
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  #1575  
Old 07-12-2010, 08:02 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Terminal_83 View Post
Archie Meets the Punisher
Fantastic, would love to see Garth Ennis tackle that story.

Henry VIII (William Shakespeare and John Fletcher, 1613)

One of the less gripping Shakespeare plays, but still great stuff.
7/10

100 Bullets Vol.1: First Shot, Last Call (Brian Azzarello and Eduardo Risso, 2000)



Started reading this incredible series when it first started and I couldn't get past Vol.4. I started again a few years later and didn't get past Vol.7 simply because the next one hadn't been released so I just put it to the back of my mind. Now I've managed to collect all thirteen books and I can't wait to see how the story evolves. The first volume sets up the awesome premise and the first few characters really well, and amongst all the cool crime dialogue, betrayals and shootouts, Azzarello keeps his focus on characters (usually of the unfortunate kind), which is vital if you want an audience to enagage and relate to the story.
9/10
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  #1576  
Old 07-15-2010, 03:51 PM
100 Bullets Vol.2: Split Second Chance (Brian Azzarello and Eduardo Risso, 2001)

8/10

100 Bullets Vol.3: Hang Up on the Hang Low (Brian Azzarello and Eduardo Risso, 2001)

10/10
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  #1577  
Old 07-15-2010, 09:30 PM
Kafka on the Shore by Haruki Murakami

Loved it. Not quite up to the standard of miraculous perfection that was The Wind-Up Bird Chronicle, but fucking incredible still, and SO tripped out.
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  #1578  
Old 07-18-2010, 06:55 PM
100 Bullets Vol.4: A Foregone Tomorrow (Brian Azzarello and Eduardo Risso, 2002)


I remember not liking this one as much but I don't know why. As the story begins to focus on The Trust whilst continuing to establish new characters it's getting even more exciting.
9/10

100 Bullets Vol.5: The Counterfifth Detective (Brian Azzarello and Eduardo Risso, 2003)


A great tribute to noir with it's own little twist. One slight complaint is that the constant metaphor speak did get ridiculous after awhile.
9/10
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  #1579  
Old 07-20-2010, 01:46 PM


This is a fun YA book kind of in the realm of a young Indiana Jones mixed with some more fantasy aspects. It is kind of a mix between early Rollins novels and James Clemens (Rollins' fantasy writing name). The mix of ancient cultures, dinosaurs, and newly created creatures makes a fun read for both children and adults.

4/5
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  #1580  
Old 07-21-2010, 07:16 PM
Waiting for the Barbarians by J.M. Coetzee

Pretty incredible.
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  #1581  
Old 07-22-2010, 12:22 AM
The Boys

The Walking Dead 75

Casting Revealed
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  #1582  
Old 07-23-2010, 03:36 PM


The second in the Joe Ledger series and hopefully not the last either because I liked this one even better than Patient Zero. It was very fast paced. 9/10
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  #1583  
Old 07-25-2010, 03:57 PM
Crossed.


Man does Garth Ennis just hate everyone.
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  #1584  
Old 07-29-2010, 03:33 AM

Really liked it.
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  #1585  
Old 08-01-2010, 09:30 AM
Read Dune. I'm disappointed again by my standoff with popular sci-fi and fantasy. I don't like the genre. It's almost always the victim of escapism, when escapism doesn't interest me as a focal. It's hard enough for authors to stay on the topic of something real when they're dreaming up characters and stories, but the added levels of creation inherent in popular sci-fi and fantasy... Entire worlds, entire races, entire cultures... It all seems to send every author over the edge, and by the end of every novel they've become too impressed with their dream than they are with relating their dream back to reality.
Most authors are not inventors and it would be wrong to say they're inventing anything. Their point is to dream, not invent, and whilst dreaming, awaken intermittently to reset the dream's perspective and give it real wisdom and real thought. Dune may give us the dream of Arrakis, but should be constantly awakening from that fiction with insights, details, and dilemmas that are also of the real world. Dune's not a heavy read, and it starts off with a strong awareness of what's real about its dream and what's not, and gives us a good mix. But by the end... I don't know. I have a standoff with this genre and I'm not really sure why. But I want to keep going and I want to know if schmoes have any suggestions for popular fantasy/sci-fi that are awake more frequently than they are asleep, if you're following my terms. Dune was fun and Dune is close, but not quite.


edit:... and then I actually finished with the closing dozen-or-so pages in Dune and that gave me a better perspective to sit with. Good story. My only q now is whether or not the sequels by Herbert are good enough to read on.

Last edited by Shinigami; 08-01-2010 at 09:08 PM..
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  #1586  
Old 08-03-2010, 02:21 PM


I've always been a big fan of Egyptian mythology so this book was right up my ally. This was packed with historical and mythological characters, facts, stories, etc. It is a YA book but it was very deep and there was a lot of information to remember throughout the entire story. The characters were well developed and enjoyable to read about which is very important when a story is written in first person. Overall a really enjoyable read that has me looking forward to the next one in the series.

4.5/5
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  #1587  
Old 08-06-2010, 07:03 AM
100 Bullets Volumes 6-13 (Brian Azzarello and Eduardo Risso, 2004-09)



Awesomeness. Continued to get more and more exciting up until that satisfying and rather Tarantinoesque ending. My favourite comic book series of all time.
10/10
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  #1588  
Old 08-07-2010, 08:19 AM
Cowboy Ninja Viking.

I just finished reading Cowboy Ninja Viking. that book was f**ing hilarious!
cant wait to read more of that.

I also picked up the first issue of Simon Dark. thought I'd give that a go.
is it any good?
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  #1589  
Old 08-07-2010, 07:35 PM


3.5/5
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  #1590  
Old 08-09-2010, 10:00 AM


8/10
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  #1591  
Old 08-11-2010, 03:08 PM


The Scarecrow - Michael Connelly
B+
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  #1592  
Old 08-11-2010, 10:11 PM


Great book, in fact, it maybe one of my favourite Stephen King books of all time. I don't know why I never read it before. Not as good as "It" or "The Stand" but it's easily in my top 5 King books of all time.

Unpredictable and creepy.
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  #1593  
Old 08-11-2010, 10:13 PM
The Walking Dead 76
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  #1594  
Old 08-15-2010, 04:30 PM


4/5
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  #1595  
Old 08-16-2010, 06:18 AM


8/10
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  #1596  
Old 08-16-2010, 12:07 PM
http://www.coverbrowser.com/image/be...2007/168-1.jpg
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  #1597  
Old 08-19-2010, 10:44 AM
The Unquenchable Thirst Of Tristan Marley (Matt Wilding) - 8/10
Considering I don't tend to go for these types of story I really enjoyed it. It's just a shame there appeared to be zero proof reading on it beforehand, so many grammatical and punctuation errors, the start of one chapter even appeared to have been rewritten without the first attempt being deleted first, it was only a couple of lines but was very obvious.
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  #1598  
Old 08-19-2010, 10:55 PM
Just put down Spider-Man And The Fantastic Four #1 & 2 and can't wait to read the rest.
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  #1599  
Old 08-22-2010, 12:56 AM


Really a great book. Lots of action and really well written.

5/5
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  #1600  
Old 08-22-2010, 02:43 PM
Over the past month:

Scott Pilgrim's Precious Little Life
10/10


Scott Pilgrim vs. the World
10/10


Scott Pilgrim & the Infinite Sadness
10/10


Scott Pilgrim Gets It Together
10/10


Scott Pilgrim vs. the Universe
10/10


Scott Pilgrim's Finest Hour
A tentative 9/10.
It's a great finale, but a little bit of a letdown. Just a little bit. Not too much.


100 Bullets, Vol. 1: First Shot, Last Call
7/10
A rough start, but as a lead in, it's pretty good.


Batman: Hush
9/10
One of the best Batman stories of the last 10 years.
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