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  #81  
Old 04-13-2012, 03:45 PM
Nora Zehetner. She was in the Brothers Bloom too.



I thank Rian for giving her to the world.
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  #82  
Old 04-13-2012, 03:51 PM
^^^
Yeah she's a cutie.

I actually didnt dig Brick THAT much the first time I saw it so I gave it a rewatch on Netflix not too long ago and I did like it more the second time around. I admire Rian for trying something off beat and different. I'd give it a solid 8/10

Brothers Bloom was a lot of fun and funny too. And of course Rian's BrBd episode ("Fly") was fucking awesome. He is definitely a talented director and I think he'll have a hit on his hands with Looper.

Also, did anyone notice a change in JGL's voice for this fiom or is it just me?
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  #83  
Old 04-13-2012, 03:52 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by anakinsrise View Post
Looks like a slick,gritty action movie.But why cant they just kill the guy in the future?
My understanding is that
Spoiler:
they have advanced forensic technology in the future allowing them to solver murders even if the body is destroyed. By sending them to the past, there's no way of using that technology to determine that a murder has occurred.
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  #84  
Old 04-13-2012, 03:53 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by adamjohnson View Post
No one in the 1940's really talked like they did in film noir either, but no one complains about that. It's a stylistic choice, plain and simple.
That's missing the point completely. Film noir dialogue stayed true to a whole genre of film, that's why no one complains.

Last edited by DaMovieMan; 04-13-2012 at 03:55 PM..
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  #85  
Old 04-13-2012, 04:18 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by jz68 View Post
My understanding is that
Spoiler:
they have advanced forensic technology in the future allowing them to solver murders even if the body is destroyed. By sending them to the past, there's no way of using that technology to determine that a murder has occurred.
I wonder if this is set around or near the time of Minority Report?
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  #86  
Old 04-13-2012, 05:48 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMovieMan View Post
What about that girl that was supposed to be the "femme fatale"? I haven't seen it in a while but I remember more than three characters speaking as if they were 30 years old and born in the 40s.
I can't remember a lot of her dialogue but the impression I got from her style of speaking was sophistication. Her character is very vague and mysterious throughout the entire film so I think she sort of stands apart from the rest of the characters for that reason. About the age thing... have you noticed how NONE of the characters actually looked like teenagers? There are very few things about the film that are remotely accurate to high school life. The entire film is highly stylized including the dialogue.


Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMovieMan View Post
True, it's not directly taken, i was exagerrating when i said it's copy-pasted from Bogey, of course Johnson couldn't have done that but the language and tone is directly taken from film-noir, I think we agree on this. Lines just like that one you quoted that make the disconnect for me. Language is a huge part of making your world believable, perhaps the most important. And when you have teenagers not talking like teenagers for no reason, how am I meant to believe?
Have you heard how real teenagers talk? It's mind-numbing and their actual conversations would make for terrible film dialogue. I agree with you that the film is an obvious homage to noir films from the past. It's a detective story so I guess Johnson wanted some of his characters to sound like characters from a detective movie. Perhaps believability wasn't a priority to him.


Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMovieMan View Post
Mulholland Drive didn't mess with language though. It's the world of David Lynch, hyper-stylized dark version of L.A. and the Hollywood game but no one in that film spoke out of their element. Whereas Brick, where you have major characters (teenagers) being "so cool" they speak and act like adults but actually really, are just teenagers. I can't get over it. It's way too jarring and makes no sense. What's worse, there's no reasnoable explanation for it in the movie. We just have to accept it and deal with it haha.

I don't know, I think dialogue is something that can be stylized just as much as anything else in a movie. It obviously took you out of the movie, but for me, it was one of the aspects that made the film unique and tied the whole thing together. For me, the mise-en-scene can be much more important than plausibility and I really connected with Brick because of the stylish elements. What I feel can override what I think, and the opening scene of Brick always elicits a powerful emotional response from me.

I think I fell in love with the movie just from the opening shot, because of the music that was playing in the background. I got an immediate vibe of what the tone was going to be like, and the unusual choice of music sort of fit with how I like to describe the movie as a "beautiful contradiction." None of the characters are believable high school students, they are all way too old looking and sounding. But for me, all of these elements gelled and came together into what I thought was a very satisfying film.


Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMovieMan View Post
And maybe the main difference is that you felt the kids were cool because they were speaking the way they were, whereas I have the complete opposite feeling.
I didn't necessarily think any of the characters were cool but I loved the fact that the main character's strongest tool was his intelligence. Every bit of conflict he faces he overcomes with his wits. This is extremely rare in movies and I really appreciated it.


Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMovieMan View Post
Definitely can't argue with that and I'm sure we've all had moments. But they're moments. Teenagers who "act cool" 24-7 becuause they're influenced by pop culture are hard to sympathize with. IMO.
I also don't think that the main character of a movie always has to be sympathetic. Some of the most fascinating aspects of characters are their flaws. Brendan is a highly focused and obsessed character. Throughout the movie he's on a mission and most of his actions are exaggerated due to the stress he's feeling. He's very abrasive to the other characters around him, I think he's far from the most likable character in a movie, but that didn't bother me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMovieMan View Post
I'm sure you're right about the metaphor, it would be my only guess too. Apart from a general homage as well. I just think there are much smarter ways to use metaphors and homage. About the world, if you say it's true then I still don't understand why some teenagers talk normally while others don't.
Brendan, the Brain, and the Pin(and femme fatale) are the intellectuals of the movie. The other characters like the jock and muscle are outwitted constantly. That's why I think their dialogue is more similar to real teenagers. Characters like Brendan act and speak more like adults(stylized adults, sure) but they never feel like real high school students, and I'm sure that's intentional.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMovieMan View Post
I should also take this time to point out that I hope you don't mind how back and forth we're going. I find these types of conversations and debates fascinating and that's why I;m still on the boards. I've got nothing against you liking this movie, it's great that you got something out of it. Judging from your favorte movies you seem to have good taste, so I just want to understand your love for this one
Not at all, I love discussions like this. I know a lot of times people get defensive during these back-and-forths and think they are being picked on. I have tough skin and film is so subjective that I find it hard to get truly upset by somebody else's opinion. Sorry for the delay in the response, I'm at work and haven't had much time to work on a reply.
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  #87  
Old 04-13-2012, 06:33 PM
Damn. Looks like DaMovieMan has a huge case of the "My opinions are facts". Always great for discussions.
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  #88  
Old 04-13-2012, 06:35 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMovieMan View Post
That's missing the point completely. Film noir dialogue stayed true to a whole genre of film, that's why no one complains.
And Brick is in that genre, jsut set in a different time.
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  #89  
Old 04-14-2012, 05:39 PM
I was feeling this movie a lot more before I saw the trailer.
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  #90  
Old 04-14-2012, 09:06 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gilpesh View Post
Damn. Looks like DaMovieMan has a huge case of the "My opinions are facts". Always great for discussions.
Yes doctor, I get that diagnosis a lot. I like to discuss opinions because that makes for great discussion and I love how it's usually some random outsider who first utters the word "fact" like it's AIDS. Thanks for your input though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveyJoeG View Post
I can't remember a lot of her dialogue but the impression I got from her style of speaking was sophistication. Her character is very vague and mysterious throughout the entire film so I think she sort of stands apart from the rest of the characters for that reason. About the age thing... have you noticed how NONE of the characters actually looked like teenagers? There are very few things about the film that are remotely accurate to high school life. The entire film is highly stylized including the dialogue.
Yes, she's vague and mysterious .. desperately so. Something else that irked me. The kids definitely look like twenty-somethings, which didn't bother me as much as them talking like they're thirty somethings. 21 Jump Street (to use a recent example) uses that kind of formula to great effect in a comedic way, and it works like gangbusters. I guess I didn't believe the hyper-stylized world that Johnson was creating because he wanted to make the tone, action, setting etc. feel so serious that I found myself laughing at some scenes.



Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveyJoeG View Post
Have you heard how real teenagers talk? It's mind-numbing and their actual conversations would make for terrible film dialogue. I agree with you that the film is an obvious homage to noir films from the past. It's a detective story so I guess Johnson wanted some of his characters to sound like characters from a detective movie. Perhaps believability wasn't a priority to him.
That's exactly what I think too and why I have such a problem with the film. When a director doesn't take believability of the world he is creating as the number one priority, my interest goes out the window fairly quickly. And real teenager talk makes me cringe too, but if we're being honest 95% of all real-life conversations between teenagers, adults etc. would make for pretty bad screen dialogue. So I'm in no way advocating real-life dialogue, leave that to documentaries, but what I'm trying to say is that adult language doesn't suit a high school setting unless you're doing a comedy.


I gotta go now, I'll be back on your other points after. Thanks for the discussion!

Last edited by DaMovieMan; 04-14-2012 at 09:18 PM..
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  #91  
Old 04-14-2012, 10:16 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by adamjohnson View Post
And Brick is in that genre, just set in a different time.
Yep.

Last edited by Bourne101; 04-14-2012 at 10:20 PM..
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  #92  
Old 04-14-2012, 10:53 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMovieMan View Post
Yes doctor, I get that diagnosis a lot. I like to discuss opinions because that makes for great discussion and I love how it's usually some random outsider who first utters the word "fact" like it's AIDS. Thanks for your input though.
Yeah. Cause this:
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMovieMan View Post
With the disappointing Brick and now this (didn't see Brothers Bloom, though that actually looks like harmless fun), Ryan Johnson will easily become the most overrated young director working today if this ridiculous hype continues.
Screams "IMHO". And Rian Johnson will never be more overrated than Richard Kelly.




I just wanted to come here to say that I'm still looking forward to this movie and that the trailer made it look more interesting. I hadn't heard that Levitt was going to have makeup which I thought that was a funny choice when others movies sometimes just get people who look nothing alike and people just accept it. I hope it will be as good as Brick and the Brothers Bloom.
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  #93  
Old 04-15-2012, 11:19 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by adamjohnson View Post
And Brick is in that genre, jsut set in a different time.
Different time and different everything else. The only thing film noir about Brick is the dialogue between some of the characters. But Brick tries really hard to be film noir, but having a few kids look all morose and indifferent, talking like adults and solving mysteries doesn't make it film noir.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gilpesh View Post
Screams "IMHO". And Rian Johnson will never be more overrated than Richard Kelly.
You should imagine that scream on every post I write because that's what every post of mine is, IMHO. I just don't feel the need to write it because, you know, we're on a forum talking about movies. It's kinda obvious. RE Richard Kelly, nothing Johnson has done really came close to Donnie Darko.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveyJoeG View Post
I don't know, I think dialogue is something that can be stylized just as much as anything else in a movie. It obviously took you out of the movie, but for me, it was one of the aspects that made the film unique and tied the whole thing together. For me, the mise-en-scene can be much more important than plausibility and I really connected with Brick because of the stylish elements. What I feel can override what I think, and the opening scene of Brick always elicits a powerful emotional response from me.

I think I fell in love with the movie just from the opening shot, because of the music that was playing in the background. I got an immediate vibe of what the tone was going to be like, and the unusual choice of music sort of fit with how I like to describe the movie as a "beautiful contradiction." None of the characters are believable high school students, they are all way too old looking and sounding. But for me, all of these elements gelled and came together into what I thought was a very satisfying film.
That's cool, I can understand how someone might not be affected by the dialogue and just be taken in by the mise-en-scene. Some of the direction in Brick is really good and I can see how someone could view it as a "beautiful contradiction". For me, it's the screenplay that is the foundation for a film, and like you say the dialogue here and how it was spoken took me out of hte experience and made the major characters sound pretentious beyond their years, which had a snowball effect of me not caring about them, laughing at them and thinking the whole movie a nicely directed joke.


Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveyJoeG View Post
I didn't necessarily think any of the characters were cool but I loved the fact that the main character's strongest tool was his intelligence. Every bit of conflict he faces he overcomes with his wits. This is extremely rare in movies and I really appreciated it.
I appreciated that too.


Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveyJoeG View Post
I also don't think that the main character of a movie always has to be sympathetic. Some of the most fascinating aspects of characters are their flaws. Brendan is a highly focused and obsessed character. Throughout the movie he's on a mission and most of his actions are exaggerated due to the stress he's feeling. He's very abrasive to the other characters around him, I think he's far from the most likable character in a movie, but that didn't bother me.
I agree that the main character doesn't have to be sympathetic, There Will Be Blood is one of my favorites from recent years and you'll have a hard time sympathizing with Plainview on anything. But for Brendan though, it's more than just not sympathizing with him: it's connected to the script again and the dialogue that he speaks, how he speaks it. Acting too cool for school (literally, ha!) all the time just makes me think you're not cool for anything. Took away most of the tension for me because I didn't really care too much about what was going to happen to him.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveyJoeG View Post
Brendan, the Brain, and the Pin(and femme fatale) are the intellectuals of the movie. The other characters like the jock and muscle are outwitted constantly. That's why I think their dialogue is more similar to real teenagers. Characters like Brendan act and speak more like adults(stylized adults, sure) but they never feel like real high school students, and I'm sure that's intentional.
Definitely intentional: just didn't work at all in my case. It's like having 20-somethings putting on a court room scene, with judge, jury, defendants, the whole spiel and trying to make the viewers believe that this is actually plausible. Brick was stylized but it certainly wanted you to invest in its characters and the story, and make the events believable. So either you're going to make a comedy out of something like this, or you run the risk of not being taken seriously. It's a risk that paid off in some cases, like yours and Bourne's and whoever else appreciates this movie. But for me, and the people I've talked to in my life, it doesn't.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveyJoeG View Post
Not at all, I love discussions like this. I know a lot of times people get defensive during these back-and-forths and think they are being picked on. I have tough skin and film is so subjective that I find it hard to get truly upset by somebody else's opinion. Sorry for the delay in the response, I'm at work and haven't had much time to work on a reply.
All good. This discussion's got me thinking if there is any other movie (that's not a comedy) which uses this children-as-adults type where the dialogue the youngsters speak sounds very adult and serious. I can't think of any, can you?

Last edited by DaMovieMan; 04-15-2012 at 11:55 AM..
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  #94  
Old 04-15-2012, 02:42 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMovieMan View Post
RE Richard Kelly, nothing Johnson has done really came close to Donnie Darko.
I know, because Rian Johnson makes good movies.
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  #95  
Old 04-15-2012, 03:02 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gilpesh View Post
I know, because Rian Johnson makes good movies.
Ha gotta agree there.

Last edited by echo_bravo; 04-16-2012 at 11:58 AM..
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  #96  
Old 04-15-2012, 05:16 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gilpesh View Post
I know, because Rian Johnson makes good movies.
And Donnie Darko is excellent, so, you agree? YAY. And the only thing Johnson makes good is a BrBa episode

Oh, you forgot to slap IMHO at the end of your sentence, careful.
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  #97  
Old 04-15-2012, 05:26 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMovieMan View Post
And Donnie Darko is excellent, so, you agree? YAY. And the only thing Johnson makes good is a BrBa episode

Oh, you forgot to slap IMHO at the end of your sentence, careful.


I like how you keep bring up Darko yet not the Box or Southland tales?
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  #98  
Old 04-15-2012, 06:26 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMovieMan View Post
Different time and different everything else. The only thing film noir about Brick is the dialogue between some of the characters. But Brick tries really hard to be film noir, but having a few kids look all morose and indifferent, talking like adults and solving mysteries doesn't make it film noir.
I have to disagree with you. Film Noir WAs just a bunch of people talking fast and solving mysteries. Except it took place int he 40's and was shot with a certain kind of (dark) chiaroscuro. A certain style, predominated by a high degree of shadows in black and white photography. Brick has this stuff in spades.





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  #99  
Old 04-15-2012, 06:39 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMovieMan View Post
Oh, you forgot to slap IMHO at the end of your sentence, careful.
I'm not the one jumping into a Richard Kelly thread and telling everyone they're wrong to like his movies. (even though they are, because his movies suck)
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  #100  
Old 04-16-2012, 12:15 AM
I think this movie looks and sounds great and I love the trailer. But I'm sorry, but I haven't really cared for anything that Rian Johnson has done although I've only seen two things of his: Brick and the episode of Breaking Bad he directed.

Brick was just so flat and none of the characters were interesting and none of the actor's were able to say the 1940's film noir dialog convincingly.

And as far as Breaking Bad goes, I'm sorry, but I thought "Fly" was the worst episode of Breaking Bad. I'm not saying the episode was totally without purpose, I suppose it served a purpose, but Walt's obsession with finding and killing the fly was amusing at first but then just got annoying, the longer it went with it. I mean, it was pretty much for the whole episode! It felt like such a waste. There must've been a better, less ridiculous way for the show to make it's point than some silly, cartoonish over the top manner that it went with. It was starting to feel like a Looney Tunes cartoon skit. Like the road runner or when the cat is always trying to kill the bird. There were some interesting reveals in the episode, but it was by far the worst episode of Breaking Bad IMO.
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  #101  
Old 04-16-2012, 12:25 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by ericdraven View Post
I like how you keep bring up Darko yet not the Box or Southland tales?
IMO, The Box is Kelly's best movie. I actually LOVE that movie! It's so surreal and cool IMO and I love the ending! Donnie Darko is pretty good, but The Box was just a much more awesome movie IMO! And while Southland Tales was such a massive mess of a movie, it was an intriguing mess and kept me entertained albeit flabbergasted for most of the movie at the same time!
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  #102  
Old 04-16-2012, 09:03 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by ericdraven View Post
I like how you keep bring up Darko yet not the Box or Southland tales?
Well, IMO, Donnie Dark is his best film so far... I haven't seen The Box and Southland Tales imploded on itself but had the makings of something great. Point is, Johnson still hasn't made something as good as DD.

Quote:
Originally Posted by adamjohnson View Post
I have to disagree with you. Film Noir WAs just a bunch of people talking fast and solving mysteries. Except it took place int he 40's and was shot with a certain kind of (dark) chiaroscuro. A certain style, predominated by a high degree of shadows in black and white photography. Brick has this stuff in spades.
Brick has some great shots, that tunnel one for example. But I disagree with you that film noir was only people talking fast and solving mysteries, that sounds like something Johnson repeated to himself as he was writing the script. Film noir has a certain charm, sense of real danger for the (anti)hero, an unpredictability etc. The Coens make great modern film noirs. Johnson's high school take has none of those things because we are meant to take "high schoolers" who talk like that seriously. If there was a punchline at the end of Brick, things would of been much different, but instead it just feels like watching a group of pretenders.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gilpesh View Post
I'm not the one jumping into a Richard Kelly thread and telling everyone they're wrong to like his movies. (even though they are, because his movies suck)
You're like one of those people that preaches living green in public, then goes back home and doesn't recycle. I'm not telling anyone they're wrong. Assume much?

Last edited by DaMovieMan; 04-16-2012 at 09:17 AM..
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  #103  
Old 04-16-2012, 09:20 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMovieMan View Post
Brick has some great shots, that tunnel one for example. But I disagree with you that film noir was only people talking fast and solving mysteries, that sounds like something Johnson repeated to himself as he was writing the script. Film noir has a certain charm, sense of real danger for the (anti)hero, an unpredictability etc. The Coens make great modern film noirs. Johnson's high school take has none of those things because we are meant to take "high schoolers" who talk like that seriously. If there was a punchline at the end of Brick, things would of been much different, but instead it just feels like watching a group of pretenders.
Well thats not what a film noir is, thats just a well-made movie.

I think you just have a problem with the dialogue to be honest.
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  #104  
Old 04-16-2012, 09:37 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by adamjohnson View Post
Well thats not what a film noir is, thats just a well-made movie.

I think you just have a problem with the dialogue to be honest.
I do. The dialogue and the fact that it's high schoolers, no matter how stylized they're meant to be.


Laura: [On the phone with Brendan] Who is this?
Brendan Frye: I won't waste your time: you don't know me.
Laura: I know everyone, and I have all the time in the world.
Brendan Frye: Ah, the folly of youth.

---------

Stuff like that reeks pretentious to me.

What I meant to say before with the charm and the unpredictability, is that the film noirs I love all had that while Brick doesn't.
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  #105  
Old 04-16-2012, 11:47 AM
Da Movie Man, I find it very interesting that you enjoy Donnie Darko so much, but dislike Brick for it's lack of believability. Donnie Darko was full of a bunch of nonsensical shit that was never explained. Now, I love Donnie Darko, for many of the same reasons that I love Brick. The mise-en-scene is so compelling to me in both films that I overlook the lack of plausibility.

Donnie Darko is very convoluted and doesn't bother explaining the bizarre aspects of the movie. There's time travel, Donnie reads a book, talks to Noah Wyle a few times, and figures out how to go back in time? I know there are some websites out there that go into great detail to explain the plot, but I'm not interested in that, the movie should be self-contained. Either way I love watching Donnie Darko, the soundtrack is excellent, and it has some very memorable lines.

Now with Brick, the phone conversation you listed above actually seems like one of the more realistic bits of dialogue. Brendan kind of reminds me of myself in that he is very mature for his age. When I was 17, I had the same kind of pretension that might potentially mock the youth of my peers. Not because I was older, but because they were still quite immature. Going back to what I was saying earlier, I think one of the biggest points of the dialogue is to separate characters based on their intellect. There are pawns and kings in the movie. Henchmen and bosses. A central theme about the movie is deception and the fact that the less intelligent characters are getting played by others who are better at "the game." Again, I think it's all kind of a metaphor for high school social behavior, there is an abundance of cliques and phoniness. For me the dialogue didn't bother me any more than the talking bunny in Donnie Darko, because they are integral to the style and tone of the film.

I think it all comes down to whether a film clicks for you or not. Sometimes you just don't like a movie, but when you sit back and try to figure out why, it's hard to put it into words. For example, I disliked Transformers for the lack of story or compelling characters, but I loved the Raid, which you could argue suffered the same flaws. I would have to concede and say that for the Raid, the good far outweighed the bad and I just enjoyed myself while watching it. Even you have admitted that Brick has some great shots and some quality aspects to it, but overall it just didn't click for you.
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  #106  
Old 04-18-2012, 11:12 AM
Hey man, sorry for not replying here. We should definitely put this debate to a close now, beacuse you've said it: Brick just didn't click for me. It happens. The dialogue and script were the big part of it, but also how the characters felt flat to me and little more than cliches. Definitely has some great shots and JGL does a good job with what he has, but I hope you can see how someone would not be able to to "buy" into the film as a whole, as a package.

I pretty much like Donnie Darko for the same reasons you do, the soundtrack is great, the dialogue is fantastic, Patrick Swayze (RIP) is hilarious, and so on. Plus, i have a soft spot for mindfuck films that make me question things and Donnie Darko certainly did that. It is just a very innovative and unique film that deserves its cult status now, but it's not of my favorite movies.

Anyways, it was great discussing Brick with you. I wish there was a rep system in times like this so I can rep you. We're shcmoe-buddies now so call me DMM
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  #107  
Old 04-18-2012, 11:33 AM
We're all a bunch of lil' Fonzie's around here, 's'all good
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  #108  
Old 04-20-2012, 11:20 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMovieMan View Post
Hey man, sorry for not replying here. We should definitely put this debate to a close now, beacuse you've said it: Brick just didn't click for me. It happens. The dialogue and script were the big part of it, but also how the characters felt flat to me and little more than cliches. Definitely has some great shots and JGL does a good job with what he has, but I hope you can see how someone would not be able to to "buy" into the film as a whole, as a package.
Yeah man, I totally get where you're coming from. For some reason the dialogue never struck me as odd or took me out of the movie, I just accepted it right away. I think maybe because I was hooked from the opening scene, I really do love it, mostly because of the music.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMovieMan View Post
I pretty much like Donnie Darko for the same reasons you do, the soundtrack is great, the dialogue is fantastic, Patrick Swayze (RIP) is hilarious, and so on. Plus, i have a soft spot for mindfuck films that make me question things and Donnie Darko certainly did that. It is just a very innovative and unique film that deserves its cult status now, but it's not of my favorite movies.
Aww, here I was hoping you'd explain the time travel in the movie, haha. I do love the movie, and maybe I should watch it again soon, I haven't seen it in years. I love movies that have an 80s feel to them. The soundtrack is excellent, both the 80s songs and the original score. I haven't seen any other of Kelly's films but the reviews are usually harsh, which is disappointing, because Donnie Darko showed so much promise.


Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMovieMan View Post
Anyways, it was great discussing Brick with you. I wish there was a rep system in times like this so I can rep you. We're shcmoe-buddies now so call me DMM
Yeah man, I love a great discussion, too often people get defensive when somebody disagrees with them. And with the Movie Fan Central, there's a serious lack of great film discussion on these boards, so thanks for helping me totally derail this thread.
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  #109  
Old 04-20-2012, 02:51 PM
EDITED BY SKYNET

Watch it Smiert, even with the "Smiley faces" if you have nothing to add when posting, don't post. Feel free to PM me if you have any questions

Last edited by SkyNet; 04-20-2012 at 03:06 PM..
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  #110  
Old 04-20-2012, 05:23 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smiert Spionam View Post
EDITED BY SKYNET

Watch it Smiert, even with the "Smiley faces" if you have nothing to add when posting, don't post. Feel free to PM me if you have any questions
............seriously, dude?

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  #111  
Old 04-20-2012, 07:50 PM
Looks cool
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  #112  
Old 06-27-2012, 07:49 PM
International trailer - http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature...&v=G90QrEKh8l8

Spoiler:
"The Rainmaker," ey?
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  #113  
Old 06-28-2012, 05:16 AM
I love time travel flicks so much and this looks totally up my alley! Can't wait to see this. That international trailer was very cool.
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  #114  
Old 06-29-2012, 01:14 PM

That international trailer was awesommmme. Cant wait for this in the Fall.
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  #115  
Old 06-29-2012, 01:36 PM
I gotta say... this looks pretty darn entertaining. I wasn't sure about it at first, but I'll watch this in theaters.
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  #116  
Old 09-08-2012, 02:37 PM
.....ahem....attention please....

Rotten Tomatoes

21 Positive
0 Negative

....awesome start. This is gonna own.
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  #117  
Old 09-08-2012, 03:17 PM
Sooooo close!
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  #118  
Old 09-09-2012, 02:41 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by AspectRatio1986 View Post
.....ahem....attention please....

Rotten Tomatoes

21 Positive
0 Negative

....awesome start. This is gonna own.
Niiice....

Here's the link for the actual reviews:

http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/looper/

May I also say how refreshing it is to see Sony finally giving Paramount and WB a run for their money in making good mainstream films again. District 9, The Social Network, Moneyball, Girl with the Dragon Tatoo, and now this.
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  #119  
Old 09-25-2012, 12:13 PM
Wow, it's at 91% with 45 reviews counted so far. Looks like this may have turned out pretty well, I'm certainly looking forward to it. And in other news, I watched Rian Johnson's episode of Breaking Bad last night, it was great.
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  #120  
Old 09-29-2012, 09:37 PM
Well this movie has finally hit theaters... go see it, it is quite amazing!

Head over to Current to discuss the movie further!
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