#161  
Old 05-06-2012, 04:13 PM
The think with Loki, is he's a reluctant villain. Hes kind of a brat, and this is all one big cry for attention - gone too far. You can see it in the finale, when Thor and Loki confront each other. Loki seems on the verge of tears, as he tells Thor its too late to stop it.

I think this is why Coulson's line, "You have no conviction." at such an important moment for him, should be looked at more closely.

Whedon once had a character whose super power was, basically, seeing the truth of things. Xander, of course. Coulson, I think, is the same guy. He believes in Cap, based on stories. And he believes in Stark, despite alist of reasons to the contrary. Not super=powered in any physical way, but just able to see things the way they are.

And he says Loki has no conviction. Loki confirms this, by being captured instead of dying fighting.

The interesting thing is though - Thanos is the exact opposite.
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  #162  
Old 05-06-2012, 04:21 PM
Am I the only person who thinks X-Men: First Class should be thought of as the "benchmark"? I don't read comics so I really don't have allegiances towards one company or the other, but First Class was probably my favorite comic movie of all time, followed by Avengers and TDK which are effectively tied.
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  #163  
Old 05-06-2012, 04:27 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost in Space View Post
Am I the only person who thinks X-Men: First Class should be thought of as the "benchmark"? I don't read comics so I really don't have allegiances towards one company or the other, but First Class was probably my favorite comic movie of all time, followed by Avengers and TDK which are effectively tied.
First Class is very good. And the benchmark can be whatever you want.
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  #164  
Old 05-06-2012, 04:36 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost in Space View Post
Am I the only person who thinks X-Men: First Class should be thought of as the "benchmark"? I don't read comics so I really don't have allegiances towards one company or the other, but First Class was probably my favorite comic movie of all time, followed by Avengers and TDK which are effectively tied.
I hated Mystique and Beast way too much to do that. Terrible effects and casting.
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  #165  
Old 05-06-2012, 04:37 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by adamjohnson View Post
The think with Loki, is he's a reluctant villain. Hes kind of a brat, and this is all one big cry for attention - gone too far. You can see it in the finale, when Thor and Loki confront each other. Loki seems on the verge of tears, as he tells Thor its too late to stop it.

I think this is why Coulson's line, "You have no conviction." at such an important moment for him, should be looked at more closely.

Whedon once had a character whose super power was, basically, seeing the truth of things. Xander, of course. Coulson, I think, is the same guy. He believes in Cap, based on stories. And he believes in Stark, despite alist of reasons to the contrary. Not super=powered in any physical way, but just able to see things the way they are.

And he says Loki has no conviction. Loki confirms this, by being captured instead of dying fighting.

The interesting thing is though - Thanos is the exact opposite.
I agree for the most part, but I do think Loki (the character not Hiddleston's performance) was the weakest part of the film. He serves his purpose though. The Avengers needed a large enough threat to assemble around, but not something like Thanos who is, in my mind, the ultimate villain. He worked as a starting point. We now have the avengers ready and willing to work together and that's what this films goal was. I am working on the assumption that the movie was the first in a series and therefore had to bring everything together. That makes Loki the rallying factor, and with the help of Coulson I think he succeeded. That is a fairly simple analysis of the character and I think you're right Adam that Loki is far deeper than that. he is emotionally stretched and attention deprived. I'm just not fully convinced that as a main villain the character type works perfectly. It did do the job though.
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  #166  
Old 05-06-2012, 04:50 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost in Space View Post
I agree for the most part, but I do think Loki (the character not Hiddleston's performance) was the weakest part of the film. He serves his purpose though. The Avengers needed a large enough threat to assemble around, but not something like Thanos who is, in my mind, the ultimate villain. He worked as a starting point. We now have the avengers ready and willing to work together and that's what this films goal was. I am working on the assumption that the movie was the first in a series and therefore had to bring everything together. That makes Loki the rallying factor, and with the help of Coulson I think he succeeded. That is a fairly simple analysis of the character and I think you're right Adam that Loki is far deeper than that. he is emotionally stretched and attention deprived. I'm just not fully convinced that as a main villain the character type works perfectly. It did do the job though.
This is all mythology, right? Where tragic characters abound.

Thor/Loki: blood brothers, Loki tries to make amends after conquering Asgard.. but Thor kills him, since Loki is a trickster and all.

He's tragic villain. I foresee Tom Hiddleston helping the Avengers in the next one. Hes beloved by the fangirls, you know.

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  #167  
Old 05-06-2012, 05:04 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost in Space View Post
Am I the only person who thinks X-Men: First Class should be thought of as the "benchmark"? I don't read comics so I really don't have allegiances towards one company or the other, but First Class was probably my favorite comic movie of all time, followed by Avengers and TDK which are effectively tied.
I think X-Men first class is definitely in my top five comic book movies of all time. I also think that Marvel's strongest and most interesting properties are Spiderman and X-men. Here's to hoping they find a way to integrate those two properties into the next Avengers film.

My top five favorite comic book movies:

1.The Dark Knight
2.Batman Begins
3.The Avengers
4. X-Men: First Class
5. X-Men

Spider-Man, (first one) was in the top five once upon a time, but even in a top ten list it would still probably be behind Thor. I'm not really a fan of the second film. I personally thought it was a little overrated. Same goes for X2, I just didn't enjoy it as much as the first X-Men, (I'm going against the majority opinion here, I know). I expect The Dark Knight Rises to slip into the number 1 or 2 spot, but only time will tell how I feel about it. For now, Avengers easily slipped into the number 3 spot. It was the most fun I've had with a comic book movie since The Dark Knight.
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  #168  
Old 05-06-2012, 05:18 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost in Space View Post
Am I the only person who thinks X-Men: First Class should be thought of as the "benchmark"? I don't read comics so I really don't have allegiances towards one company or the other, but First Class was probably my favorite comic movie of all time, followed by Avengers and TDK which are effectively tied.
Depends on what you mean. When people talk about these movies, sometimes it's purely about enjoyment. But a lot of times, accuracy is a factor, which is why many X-Men fans would argue that X2 is better than First Class: it was a much more faithful adaptation, and still a pretty solid movie.

I don't think TDK should be compared to these movies. I find it has more in common with normal crime dramas than Superhero movies.

Being a comic book guy, my biases are too strong to declare a benchmark. But I think most people would agree that First Class is in the uper echelon of comic book/superhero movies.

For a pure enjoyment standpoint, I liked several comic book movies more than TDK. I think First Class and Avengers are both better, and I liked Spiderman 2 more (but again, that's bias creeping in... at one point when I was a kid, I collected 4 different Spiderman monthly comic books)
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  #169  
Old 05-06-2012, 05:41 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shinigami View Post
There was a discussion a page back about how this movie will be the new benchmark for superhero ambitions, and I think that's almost ironclad. The reviews are astounding, the opening was incredible, and the general reaction is really positive. I'm acknowledging that even though the Avengers might end up flagging where I part ways with the superhero movie because I'm not the audience for them anymore. I didn't think much of the movie, but everybody else did. Most of the film felt like a high profile Power Rangers feature. I'm not engaged by this version of superhero comic books, but there's no more question - this is the popular version of superhero comics. There is no indication that this isn't the new benchmark. Its reviews are unprecedented, its box office is unprecedented, and likely its reception will be unprecedented. Audiences, critics and money have spoken, and I can't imagine why everybody won't listen in the future.

Those of us who shrugged our shoulders and started fidgeting in our seats should accept that we're no longer the audience. We are the odd guys and gals out. Avengers has achieved something as close to universal approval as possible, and I won't be surprised if future properties try to follow this model. I just hope a few superhero adaptions will still come down the line that will interest people like me.



Great comment on the whole thing. I agree, and it explains where the audience parts ways. The good news for fans of superhero comics is how receptive mainstream audiences have been. So much of Avengers - the economic dialogue, the convolution of disparate ideas from separate universes co-existing (the worm hole into another universe, the alien invasion, mind control), and the almost total detachment from disbelief, is something a lot of comic book fans probably didn't think would ever be so readily embraced. It opens a lot of new doors. Whatever fallout it causes for people like me is negligible, because we aren't the fans and we aren't the people anybody needs to please.

200 mil opening. Hot damn.
You are one of my absolutely favorite posters on the entire internet, and I just want you to know how much I look forward to reading your stuff. You have both intelligence and insight, and you express yourself very well. So, a few things about your post. Have you ever heard of (or read) this book:



Jeph Loeb started it years ago, when he was working at DC, as a way to get Superman and Batman in the same book every month. For those who don't know, Jeph Loeb is not only the best popcorn entertainment writer in comics, he has written some more serious work (like the long halloween), but what he's known for these days is popcorn stuff. At Marvel, he wrote:



Which is the same kind of thing he wrote in Superman/Batman at DC (don't believe me? Marvel even hired the same artist Loeb worked with on the first six issues of S/B to do X-anction. Its obvious what Marvel was going for). X-sanction is the classic comic book/time travel popcorn plot: Cable thinks the Avengers are responsible for the apocalyptic world in which he lives, because something happened to Hope and the Avengers were responsible, so he travels back in time to defeat the Avengers, and does so one by one. This leads to the Avengers fighting the x-men. Its popcorn making at its best: you don't have to think too hard about it, and cool stuff gets blown up. Comics have always had popcorn books, just like movies have always had popcorn films, its part of the medium. And, like film, popcorn books sell like crazy, that's why people keep putting them out. Superman/Batman was the runaway #1 seller in the industry for a long time. It turns out people like stories that you don't have to think too hard about and where cool stuff gets blown up.

However, the beauty of comics, and the beauty of film, is that they're both very flexible mediums. Sure there's popcorn stuff, but comics can accomodate a huge dramatic range. However, me? I like 'em all. I'll buy some of the more dramatic stuff, but I still like a good popcorn book to thumb through. A good event book is gold, for me, because I really do enjoy the escapism aspect of the medium. Real life is too hard to be intelligent all the time. That's why in my collection, there are books I consider art, and there are ones I consider just fun.

Now, I will agree with the premise of your post. As I've said more than once, my problem with Hollywood is that they often learn the wrong lessons from their experiences. Money is tough to make, I get that. However, the Avengers succeeds, that doesn't mean every film has to (or should) be like that. There will be plenty of $$$$ left for the TDKR, a darker, edgier film to rake in later this summer. Hopefully Hollywood figures out that what film goers want is balance: popcorn movies are fun to watch, darker edgier stuff, properly made, is fun to watch.
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  #170  
Old 05-06-2012, 06:10 PM
It was a fun film but not the "best superhero film" ever made though. I actually felt Hawkeye was underused and honestly, I can't stand Samuel L. Jackson's acting. I think he's a horrible Nick Fury. Everyone else was great though, especially Ruffalo as Banner. This is Marvel's best superhero film and the sequel has a lot more potential to be better and could be the best superhero film ever made but right now... TDK still holds the cake.
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  #171  
Old 05-06-2012, 07:17 PM
It was a fun time and a real cinematic accomplishment that is rare these days. However it certainly wasn't perfect. Probably a 7/10.

I look forward to the future of Marvel movies!
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  #172  
Old 05-06-2012, 08:26 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bourne101 View Post
The Avengers - 8/10

In my opinion, Iron Man and The Hulk are far and away the most interesting characters used in the movie, and I personally find Captain America, Thor, Hawkeye and Black Widow to be rather uninteresting characters. I think it would have been better to substitute a few of them with characters like Spider-Man and Wolverine. I'm not familiar with the comics though, so I don't know if that would be blasphemy or not.
No it wouldn't be blasphemy, they just happen to come along a lot later


There are other interesting Avengers that came before them: The Vision, Wonder-Man, Ant-man (which would open a potential huge story with Ultron), War Machine, She Hulk, Namor (Sub-Mariner), and Black Panther

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bourne101 View Post
I also had some issues with the plot, which was rather stale. Whedon certainly made the most of it, but it was something we have seen so many times before. Unlimited energy sources, portals, etc. The use of all of these characters is itself original, so why not put them in a story that isn't the basis for every generic superhero movie that we've seen in the last 15 years? I think with a better story, some more interesting characters, and a more menacing villain, the sequel could make it over the fence.
I think your two issues can possibly be solved in the sequel.

If they happen to follow through with Thanos, he is one of the ultimate Marvel Villains

and he is tied to the Cosmic Cube also
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  #173  
Old 05-06-2012, 08:30 PM

Thanks for the info Big Boss!
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  #174  
Old 05-06-2012, 08:33 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bourne101 View Post
First Class is very good. And the benchmark can be whatever you want.
Whew, I'm so relieved that we all now have official permission to use whatever we want as a benchmark!
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  #175  
Old 05-06-2012, 08:42 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by soda View Post
I've been called something of a turncoat because I'm not a "straight ticket voter", I like both companies, and I think comics, as a medium, is absolutely at the peak of its strength when BOTH companies are ridiculously strong. A lot of people disagree with that sentiment, and they want comics to be "the marvel way" or the "DC way". I do not.
I agree with this 100%, and I think it extends to films as well. Superhero films are at their peak when we have both DC and Marvel films playing at high levels. I loved The Avengers, and I greatly look forward to TDKR as well.

Period.
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  #176  
Old 05-06-2012, 08:43 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeChar4321 View Post
Whew, I'm so relieved that we all now have official permission to use whatever we want as a benchmark!
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeChar4321 View Post
Avengers is now the benchmark that other will be measured by and no amount of self imposed "head up the ass syndrome" will change that fact.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeChar4321 View Post
There's is no doubt that Avengers is a standard of excellence and now achievement ($200 million domestic), etc., against which similar films must be measured from here on out.
Someone needed a reminder.

Last edited by Bourne101; 05-06-2012 at 08:47 PM..
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  #177  
Old 05-06-2012, 08:43 PM
Wait a fucking minute here, wasn't War Machine suppose to be in this as well? I remember Don Cheadle saying awhile back he signed on for multiple films including Avengers?
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  #178  
Old 05-06-2012, 08:48 PM
tlw/ dr

Quote:
So you are saying the benchmark has been lowered?
Nah. I don't represent any universal measure for quality, and 'objectively' the Avengers is a superior product in so many of our product measures - its box office (so far), its critical reception, and even its audience reception seems uniquely positive in a way I haven't seen from a comic book movie since Dark Knight. I'm just acknowledging that I didn't enjoy the film because I'm looking for something different in a superhero movie, and wondering if what I'm looking for might become a niche. Before Marvel came along the super hero movie, while finding its footing, was still experimenting with new approaches that varied in substance and ambition. To me, Marvel movies (original Iron man excluded) felt almost streamlined. They had different directors, unique visions, interesting casting choices, but for whatever reason, they felt similar in some way I can't define well because I didn't connect with the movies and haven't put any thought into it.

Quote:
You are one of my absolutely favorite posters on the entire internet, and I just want you to know how much I look forward to reading your stuff. You have both intelligence and insight, and you express yourself very well.
I don't have a background in comics, although I have read the typical assortment of top shelf stuff comic fans can hand off to the uninitiated without a problem (Alan Moore, Gaiman, the usual). I come into this stuff from the background of someone who is into anime, when the film industry is still in its infancy with anime the way the super hero movie was still in its infancy about 12 years ago. And that's a good comparison party because these mediums have a lot in common, both because of the enormous scope they cover - which is why I said 'medium' and not genre, and also because of the difficulty in translating their stories and storytelling onto film. They have their quirks. They have their angles people outside the medium scratch their heads at, and it takes some time ingratiating mainstream into the fold. It's difficult enough to adapt them into film for the mainstream. What's more, each successful adaptation makes some ripples which influence other projects in development. And while super heroes in film have had enough solid hits to give the field some flexibility, Avengers is still unprecedented, still a watermark, and I'm wondering what kind of waves it will make.

Quote:
You are one of my absolutely favorite posters on the entire internet
If DC begins putting together Justice League again, I wonder how often a trilogy like Nolan's is going to be able to appear (or Snyder's Superman, for that matter, which I'm looking forward to). Like adamjohnson said, Nolan brought real life into comics while Marvel is bringing comics to life, and that's an interesting difference.

Quote:
You are one of my absolutely favorite posters on the entire internet
One of the things I really like about following these adaptions is the huge gulf filmmakers have to jump across to make the transition. I love that. Filmmakers have to really work to translate anime stories or comic book stories into film. It's interesting to watch and it's invigorating, because it forces filmmakers to be innovative in a way most blockbusters aren't. But I want them to have to work hard to figure out a way to transition comic books. Avengers makes me wonder if filmmakers aren't going to have to work that hard anymore, because the worm holes and mind control alien attacks all came into the picture with the swift ease of a comic book, and much swifter than the individual movies introduced their comic bookish elements. Iron Man worked to introduce its universe. The Incredible Hulk was fine. Both Captain America and Thor also made some efforts. Avengers gets brownie points for its ambition, and in a way, it is the culmination of another new innovation. And it's a little silly to complain about this movie having allowed itself to introduce itself with ease, since the Avengers has been introducing itself ever since Iron Man started.

Quote:
You are one of my absolutely favorite posters on the entire internet
But I don't know how many people have actually followed the individual movies. They have not been 'that' successful. It's possible audiences have just reached a point where they no longer have to be ingratiated into a comic book world, which means that the innovations which come from a filmmaker having to translate comics into film could dwindle a little bit.
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  #179  
Old 05-06-2012, 08:56 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Shinigami View Post
Nah. I don't represent any universal measure for quality, and 'objectively' the Avengers is a superior product in so many of our product measures - its box office (so far), its critical reception, and even its audience reception seems uniquely positive in a way I haven't seen from a comic book movie since Dark Knight. I'm just acknowledging that I didn't enjoy the film because I'm looking for something different in a superhero movie, and wondering if what I'm looking for might become a niche. Before Marvel came along the super hero movie, while finding its footing, was still experimenting with new approaches that varied in substance and ambition. To me, Marvel movies (original Iron man excluded) felt almost streamlined. They had different directors, unique visions, interesting casting choices, but for whatever reason, they felt similar in some way I can't define well because I didn't connect with the movies and haven't put any thought into it.



I don't have a background in comics, although I have read the typical assortment of top shelf stuff comic fans can hand off to the uninitiated without a problem (Alan Moore, Gaiman, the usual). I come into this stuff from the background of someone who is into anime, when the film industry is still in its infancy with anime the way the super hero movie was still in its infancy about 12 years ago. And that's a good comparison party because these mediums have a lot in common, both because of the enormous scope they cover - which is why I said 'medium' and not genre, and also because of the difficulty in translating their stories and storytelling onto film. They have their quirks. They have their angles people outside the medium scratch their heads at, and it takes some time ingratiating mainstream into the fold. It's difficult enough to adapt them into film for the mainstream. What's more, each successful adaptation makes some ripples which influence other projects in development. And while super heroes in film have had enough solid hits to give the field some flexibility, Avengers is still unprecedented, still a watermark, and I'm wondering what kind of waves it will make.



If DC begins putting together Justice League again, I wonder how often a trilogy like Nolan's is going to be able to appear (or Snyder's Superman, for that matter, which I'm looking forward to). Like adamjohnson said, Nolan brought real life into comics while Marvel is bringing comics to life, and that's an interesting difference.



One of the things I really like about following these adaptions is the huge gulf filmmakers have to jump across to make the transition. I love that. Filmmakers have to really work to translate anime stories or comic book stories into film. It's interesting to watch and it's invigorating, because it forces filmmakers to be innovative in a way most blockbusters aren't. But I want them to have to work hard to figure out a way to transition comic books. Avengers makes me wonder if filmmakers aren't going to have to work that hard anymore, because the worm holes and mind control alien attacks all came into the picture with the swift ease of a comic book, and much swifter than the individual movies introduced their comic bookish elements. Iron Man worked to introduce its universe. The Incredible Hulk was fine. Both Captain America and Thor also made some efforts. Avengers gets brownie points for its ambition, and in a way, it is the culmination of another new innovation. And it's a little silly to complain about this movie having allowed itself to introduce itself with ease, since the Avengers has been introducing itself ever since Iron Man started.



But I don't know how many people have actually followed the individual movies. They have not been 'that' successful. It's possible audiences have just reached a point where they no longer have to be ingratiated into a comic book world, which means that the innovations which come from a filmmaker having to translate comics into film could dwindle a little bit.
I don't know if you intentionally quoted him saying your his favorite poster that many times, but I laughed pretty hard either way. You're a great poster and i'm not taking away from that I just thought it was funny you quoted it multiple times and bolded it the final time.

bravo
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  #180  
Old 05-06-2012, 11:55 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by adamjohnson View Post
This is all mythology, right? Where tragic characters abound.

Thor/Loki: blood brothers, Loki tries to make amends after conquering Asgard.. but Thor kills him, since Loki is a trickster and all.

He's tragic villain. I foresee Tom Hiddleston helping the Avengers in the next one. Hes beloved by the fangirls, you know.

From Tom:

Tom: All of his villainy comes from a kind of betrayal. He just feels like the narrative of his whole life has been an appalling lie. So hes kind of heartbroken. And maybe if someone can actually get through this sort of, the leather and metal and this shell of anger that he has, maybe they can like, give him a hug. [x]
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  #181  
Old 05-07-2012, 12:57 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyNet View Post
Spider Man was the first movie to have an opening weekend of over $100 Million and now The Avengers is the first movie to open to over $200 Million (Although, the number is $200.3 Million.. when actual numbers get released, it is possible for the movie to be under $200 Million)
2002 = Spider-Man breaks the $100 million opening barrier.

2012 = Avengers breaks the $200 million opening barrier.

2022 = Avengers VS X-Men breaks the $300 million opening barrier.

You read it here first.

Also, The front page of Monday's paper: Avengers Set Box Office Records, Shawarma Sales Skyrocket.

Last edited by JoeChar4321; 05-07-2012 at 01:06 AM..
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  #182  
Old 05-07-2012, 04:32 AM
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  #183  
Old 05-07-2012, 07:07 AM
The more I think of it, the more I think he has a shot: Joss Whedon, oscar nomination for best director?

Best movie I know the Academy won't go for, but best director? Come on, everybody has to recognize that he had such a difficult task ahead of himself, and he just delivers. Even more than we were expecting, and we were definitively expecting much of him.

Who agrees?
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  #184  
Old 05-07-2012, 09:06 AM
The more I think about it and let it stew in my head the more I like it...what a fun super hero/summer blockbuster should be....definitely way better than The Incredible Hulk, Iron Man 1/2, Thor and Captain America...cant wait to pick this up on Blu Ray in a couple of months!
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  #185  
Old 05-07-2012, 10:10 AM
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  #186  
Old 05-07-2012, 11:02 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by miguel_montes View Post
The more I think of it, the more I think he has a shot: Joss Whedon, oscar nomination for best director?

Best movie I know the Academy won't go for, but best director? Come on, everybody has to recognize that he had such a difficult task ahead of himself, and he just delivers. Even more than we were expecting, and we were definitively expecting much of him.

Who agrees?
He's got my vote. Everything was orchestrated perfectly.

One particular shot that I loved...

Spoiler:
It took me more than one viewing to notice that SUPERB "one shot" Whedon pulled off during the battle. The camera never breaks as we check in on each Avenger! It starts with the Widow riding the alien then goes to Iron Man as he picks off those on her tail then Tony goes to ground. He teams with Cap for a quick blast off Cap's shield then the camera follows him up to Hawkeye. Clint fires an arrow that we follow in to an alien. That alien crashes in to a leviathon that Thor and Hulk team up to take down. All "one shot" and as cool as anything I've ever seen.
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  #187  
Old 05-07-2012, 12:44 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Gunslinger View Post
Wait a fucking minute here, wasn't War Machine suppose to be in this as well? I remember Don Cheadle saying awhile back he signed on for multiple films including Avengers?
More recently he said that he wasn't going to be in Avengers and that they may make a stand alone War Machine movie.

I'd love a just straight Marvel Universe crossover movie, not just the avengers line up and everybody involved. Maybe it starts off with the avengers, then in mid-battle War Machine shows up...and others.
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  #188  
Old 05-07-2012, 01:46 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeChar4321 View Post
2022 = Avengers VS X-Men breaks the $300 million opening barrier.

You read it here first.
I'd be down for that, but do we have to wait until 2022?
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  #189  
Old 05-07-2012, 04:06 PM
wow, so who would have thought that a 200.3 million prediction would be on the low end! movie actually made just over 207 million! wow!
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  #190  
Old 05-07-2012, 04:26 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeChar4321 View Post
One particular shot that I loved...

Spoiler:
It took me more than one viewing to notice that SUPERB "one shot" Whedon pulled off during the battle. The camera never breaks as we check in on each Avenger! It starts with the Widow riding the alien then goes to Iron Man as he picks off those on her tail then Tony goes to ground. He teams with Cap for a quick blast off Cap's shield then the camera follows him up to Hawkeye. Clint fires an arrow that we follow in to an alien. That alien crashes in to a leviathon that Thor and Hulk team up to take down. All "one shot" and as cool as anything I've ever seen.
I saw the movie twice already and I never noticed this. I must see it a third time then!
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  #191  
Old 05-07-2012, 04:29 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by soda View Post
I'd be down for that, but do we have to wait until 2022?
Because it is every 10 years that the next 100 million barrier is broken:

Spider man: 116 Million in 2002
The Avengers: 207 Million in 2012
Avengers vs. X-Men: 303 Million in 2022
Kazaam 2: 404 Million in 2032
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  #192  
Old 05-07-2012, 05:01 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyNet View Post
Because it is every 10 years that the next 100 million barrier is broken:

Spider man: 116 Million in 2002
The Avengers: 207 Million in 2012
Avengers vs. X-Men: 303 Million in 2022
Kazaam 2: 404 Million in 2032
So what film broke the $1 million barrier in 1992?
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  #193  
Old 05-07-2012, 05:26 PM
Fun movie, better than most superhero films but not the best in my opinion.

8/10

Hopefully the success of this gets the wheels turning on a Justice League movie.
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  #194  
Old 05-07-2012, 07:15 PM
Saw the movie over the weekend........like most of the world, lol. Check out my full review on my blog if you wish at:

http://www.mikeyatthemovies11.blogsp...-avengers.html

I thought it was an overall great flick, but not 100% perfect....

Thanks,

mike
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  #195  
Old 05-07-2012, 08:28 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Gunslinger View Post
So what film broke the $1 million barrier in 1992?
Cool World
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  #196  
Old 05-07-2012, 09:28 PM
My only complaint:

Spoiler:
The nuke hits the Chitauri mothership and all the Chitauri just die? Seemed like a cop-out and was very reminiscent of The Phantom Menace.


This didn't really affect my enjoyment of the movie though; I'd still give it a 9/10.
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  #197  
Old 05-07-2012, 09:43 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by smok3h View Post
My only complaint:

Spoiler:
The nuke hits the Chitauri mothership and all the Chitauri just die? Seemed like a cop-out and was very reminiscent of The Phantom Menace.


This didn't really affect my enjoyment of the movie though; I'd still give it a 9/10.
Actually, it reminded me the end of Stargate.
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  #198  
Old 05-07-2012, 09:59 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkyNet View Post
wow, so who would have thought that a 200.3 million prediction would be on the low end! movie actually made just over 207 million! wow!


Quote:
Originally Posted by smok3h View Post
My only complaint:

Spoiler:
The nuke hits the Chitauri mothership and all the Chitauri just die? Seemed like a cop-out and was very reminiscent of The Phantom Menace.


This didn't really affect my enjoyment of the movie though; I'd still give it a 9/10.
Spoiler:
As the film started, I saw the Chitauri troops taking pieces of the energy source and placing it on themselves. I assumed that it powered them or allowed them to function in our atmosphere. Either way, cutting the cord works for me. There was absolutely no more action you could have packed in to that brawl in my book.
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  #199  
Old 05-07-2012, 10:23 PM
I saw it, but I need to see it again. People in the theatre ruined my experience with laughs that were too long (so I missed dialogue) and having those "What did he just say?" conversations amongst themselves...
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  #200  
Old 05-07-2012, 10:29 PM
It needed more slow mo like that Thor shot on Hulk. That was awesome.
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