#5281  
Old 09-29-2012, 08:37 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jig Saw 123 View Post
I can see the poster I posted on my computer

And the movie I watched was Looper.
When it comes down to it, please PLEASE just post the name of the movie.
In Korea, many sites are BLOCKED anyway and I can't see it even if other countries can.
At work, Photobucket doesn't work.

It's not difficult to just type the title as well as post a pic.
  #5282  
Old 09-29-2012, 09:02 PM
13 Assassins (6/10)
  #5283  
Old 09-29-2012, 11:12 PM
Rock of Ages

Two reasons why I saw this film, one the fact its supposedly filled with classic 80's rock tracks and two, the word on the street surrounding Mr Cruise's performance as 'Stacee Jaxx'.

Was pretty disappointed straight away to find out the plot is the most basic overused cliched idea that plays out just like 'Burlesque'. Of course being an all out musical you don't expect a fantastic story (well not in this day and age anyway) but the moment the lead female character leaves her small town for the brights lights of the big city I sunk in my chair and groaned.

Zeta Jones' character plot was sooooooo so damn cheesy and cliched too. A politician who is religious and against rock music because it corrupts and twists young minds yet slowly turns to the 'darkside'!! come on guys at least try for something a little inspired.

I think this would have been better with unknowns in the main roles too or at least people who can actually sing and dance properly. Using big name stars just doesn't help in my view, Cruise does a surprisingly good job as the perpetually drunk 'Jaxx' it has to be said but using someone like Alec Baldwin!!?. I have to admit that Brand was a good casting choice (one of the only ones), he looks the part and also acts the part in reality! unsure about his odd Brummie-ish accent though.

On the other hand then you have casting like Julianne Hough, your stereotypical boring limp wet blonde who has the same kind of vacuous part in 'Burlesque'.

I personally didn't get on with the film much. I kinda expected something akin to classics like 'Little Shop' or 'Rocky Horror' but all I saw was a cliched unoriginal concept with various classic songs butchered by various unknown people. Does make you appreciate the actual artists and their skills, oh and by the way many songs in this film aren't actually rock songs.

I can't really berate this film too much because it does exactly what its suppose to do and that's give you the viewer a good time without using your brain much. The plot is lame, acting generally is cheesy or bad and the songs are badly sung...but the big time visuals and dance sequences will be liked by many I'm sure. What gets me is the fact the creators have settled on such a basic boring idea when I'm sure this could of been something pretty special.
  #5284  
Old 09-30-2012, 01:43 AM
Savages

Based on yet another novel this story revolves around a trio of young adults that grow and sell their own cannabis. Their stuff is so damn good it attracts attention from bigger fish that want in, of course this equals friction, kidnapping and eventual death related problems. In short its a drug film involving cartels and much violence....oh yeah.

So what does Stone give us here? what can he offer that is refreshing and new? well not much as it happens. Its the same old story I'm afraid, been there, seen it, done it. Don't get me wrong, this film is well made in every aspect, acting is solid, visuals are eye catching and violence is nasty but the whole notion is just old.

This could of been made by either Scott brothers and utilized Denzel Washington easily, its that kind of flick. The visual style is a very common flavour in recent years but it does look swish as we get flashbacks that break up the plot continuity. Add to this the slick vicious sharp violence and the film does become more interesting (in a morbid way), not much violence but what there is is enough to satisfy.

The problem is the film is slooooooooow, oh so slow, it takes ages before anything fun happens and the plot gets moving. Until then we get constant narration from Lively telling us every little plot detail as if we're children. The other thing is most of the beginning plot is merely about drugs and how these hippy-like young adults sell/grow it...up until the kidnapping of course, but even then it trudges along like a hiker knee deep in snow.

The cast helps a lot of course, the main players here being the always excellent Del Toro and the always gorgeous Hayek. What does Del Toro do? guess...he can only be one thing in a drug cartel film right? yep...the sadistic enforcer. Hayek is the cartel boss and my god she looks good, dare I say even sexier than her impressive performance in 'From Dusk Till Dawn'? If you gotta be kidnapped then you can't go far wrong than being kidnapped by Hayek in this film or reality even!. Just a shame she doesn't really come across as a badass drug cartel kingpin, she's too nice to the hostage.

Other cast includes Travolta in a small role where he kinda does what he's done before in various action flicks, be a crooked smartass. The good guys are fine but nothing special, new action boy Taylor Kitsch finally seems to have landed with something semi decent. Blake Lively looks nice and gets screwed a lot, doesn't add much else.

A good film of sorts but terribly slow and sparse of action even though you get the impression there will be lots. Some good acting saves the day for sure but despite that and the nifty camera work Stone really misses a chance to muster up a cracking tense thriller. Kinda get the impression he's trying to copy the Scott brothers and maybe even have a go at Tarantino's throne but shoots wide of the mark...if only by a relatively small margin.
  #5285  
Old 09-30-2012, 03:57 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jig Saw 123 View Post
I can see the poster I posted on my computer
The image will still be in your cache so you can see it but nobody else can (unless they happen to have gone to that particular xyz site page).

Life On Mars US S01 - 1/10
I just don't even know what to say.
Flesh For The Beast - 3/10
  #5286  
Old 09-30-2012, 04:58 AM
The Inbetweeners Movie - 8/10

The Hunter -7.5/10

Last edited by UseYourIllusion; 09-30-2012 at 05:59 AM..
  #5287  
Old 09-30-2012, 08:34 AM
SHAUN OF THE DEAD - 8/10

Thus begins my "Halloween Sundays". I will be skipping some of my favorites to instead find the lighter side of horror to keep some of my squeemish friends from being detracted by my Halloween Sundays.
This is just such a clever, heartfelt and ridiculous movie. I love it every time I see it.

ZOMBIELAND - 7/10

I forgot how little zombies there actually are in this movie. Sure, the final act paves the way for plenty of zombie action, but almost everything before that is nothing but drama.
The highlight of course lies in when the group stays up at "B.M.'s" place.... that shit is beyond hilarious and I couldn't stop laughing. After all of that, though, it once again becomes kind of hum-drum.
Great work by the principle cast, but for a zombie movie it really is light on the zombies. That's OK, the last act was full of some main characters being complete idiots for no reason other than to put a shitload of zombies into the equation and in the end that works for me.
  #5288  
Old 09-30-2012, 11:04 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirtyfrog View Post
I have to be honest with the schmoes ......


Haha, true.

The Raid (Gareth Evans, 2012)



Superb indie martial-arts flick, thrilling when the fights are occuring, tense and atmospheric when they aren't. Part of me thought the violence was a little too gratuitous (and I'm really not one to complain about stuff like that), but hopefully Evans and Uwais can come up with a decent follow-up film, as The Raid has pretty much everything you could want from an action film.
8/10

Looper (Rian Johnson, 2012)



I can't not like a sci-fi action movie with an original concept and Looper delivers plenty of futuristic thrills as well as food for thought. However, more set pieces would have been nice, plus I think that for all the issues the film explores, the script could have handled some of them better. The film kind of plods along with one plot turn/fallout after the other and though I was satisfied with the ending, surely Johnson might have wanted to leave things open for a franchise? The actors all delivered good-but-not-their-best work with Emily Blunt being the standout and despite the comic charm of young Pierce Gagnon, I find giving young kids more dramatic scenes troublesome (can't really elaborate without spoiling but those who have seen it will know what I mean). Still, it's slick, stylish, funny and thought-provoking, can't say it doesn't deserve its status as the sci-fi film of the year.
7/10

Last edited by Natty; 09-30-2012 at 11:06 AM..
  #5289  
Old 09-30-2012, 04:42 PM
Corpse Bride (Tim Burton & Mike Johnson, 2005)



You can see why Tim Burton was sacked from Disney. I always welcome an animated film with darker, more adult themes though and Corpse Bride was a brisk but fun watch even if it did suck as a musical. Kinda looking forward to Frankenweenie now.
7/10
  #5290  
Old 09-30-2012, 08:07 PM
Amistad (6/10)
  #5291  
Old 09-30-2012, 08:41 PM
Alexander - Colin Farrell was completely wrong for the lead role. He does not really look like a leader of armies and his acting was pretty weak in this film. The story just wasn't very compelling either not to mention the numerous historical inaccuracies. Some of the fight scenes were well done though. 4/10
  #5292  
Old 10-01-2012, 04:46 AM
UPDATE:

Trouble with the Curve - ***

An okay baseball movie but a very lovely father/daughter story with terrific performances from Clint Eastwood and especially the lovely Amy Adams.


Home of the Brave - ** 1/2

The opening 20 minute sequence in Iraq is truly harrowing, disturbing and as powerful as film gets. Too bad the drama that occurs that in the post Iraq scenes don't really work nearly as well despite some strong acting and individual scenes that do work. Disappointing overall though.


Looper - *** 1/2

A strong 1st act, an OKAY 2nd act and an absolutely INCREDIBLE 3rd act! All in all, I loved it. The ending packs quite a punch.
  #5293  
Old 10-01-2012, 06:29 AM
Machine Gun Preacher - 8.5/10

Lovely Molly - 8/10

Last edited by UseYourIllusion; 10-01-2012 at 07:42 AM..
  #5294  
Old 10-01-2012, 08:19 AM
The Tall Man



6.5/10
  #5295  
Old 10-01-2012, 09:43 AM
the 31 Days of Horror marathon starts



8.5/10
  #5296  
Old 10-01-2012, 11:30 AM
#2



8/10
  #5297  
Old 10-01-2012, 03:05 PM
Pride and Glory (Gavin O' Connor, 2008)



Standard cop drama with a good cast, particularly Colin Farrell.
6/10
  #5298  
Old 10-01-2012, 04:24 PM

End of Watch(2012)-8/10
  #5299  
Old 10-01-2012, 06:48 PM
Ziegfeld Follies - A collection of dance numbers and comedy sketches by many of the days top performers. Some of the skits were good especially Red Skelton's but the dance numbers weren't all that impressive. 5/10

People Like Us - I really liked Elizabeth Banks in this story but Chris Pine was wooden throughout the film. The little kid was annoying too. Come to think of it it was the female characters that carried the film. I did like the ending though. 6/10
  #5300  
Old 10-01-2012, 09:27 PM


Pet Sematary

There is something deeply personal and profound in Stephen King’s novel Pet Sematary. Subject matter about the concept of death, and how to handle the loss of animal or, god forbid, a loved one is something that can hit many people on a personal level. King certainly pulls no punches in his 1983 novel, and director Mary Lambert certainly keeps that vision intact, with the help of a screenplay by the author himself. There are moments where the film feels compounded when it should elaborate on certain character’s actions and motivations, but for the most part is an effective, and deeply personal horror movie.

The film follows doctor Louis Creed (Dale Midkiff) and his family who move into a new home in Maine along a busy highway. Quickly befriending their elderly neighbor Jud (Fred Gwynne), the family discovers a pet cemetery that resides behind their home. It’s at this point of the story is where the themes of death and the possibility of the afterlife become more important to the film’s story. Louis must deal with his daughter’s impending fear of losing their pet cat Church (short for Winston Churchill), as well as her questions of what happens where people go when they die. These difficulties come ahead when Louis soon discovers what goes beyond the pet cemetery, a Indian burial ground that has the power to bring the dead back to life.

From there, the film slowly creeps into increasingly dark territory for it’s characters, and Lambert isn’t willing to pull any punches, thanks to King’s screenplay, from where each character is going to go. Some certain sequences are astounding in how gut punching they are, particularly by the middle act. There is that certainty of where the film will be going when it hits that fairly terrifying (not in a scary way) final act, but the story at that point is just so powerful in it’s horror elements that there is no way to go but further down in that terrible dark hole.

The actors themselves acquit to the material effectively, Midkiff in particular. He’s great as the father who is suddenly dealing with grief and death in the most unexpected ways, but never tries to grasp how fast life can escape before it’s too late. Fred Gwynne as Jud, on the other hand, has had the experience of knowing what death and loss has done to the hearts of people. He brings that weary elder sage-like advice with panache, as if he has had the whole weight of the world on his shoulders. Denise Crosby brings certain despair as Rachel Creed, a mother who, due to past experiences, is very fragile whenever the subject of death is brought up. Blaze Berdhal does what she needs to do as Louis’s daughter Ellie, and a young Miko Hughes (also notably seen in Wes Craven’s New Nightmare) is excellent as Gage, the Creed’s youngest two-year-old son.

As for the direction, Lambert certainly gets the mood and setting of Sematary down pat, though at times goes a tad overboard with some of the supernatural elements that pop up in the film. The actual Maine location is perfect for the film’s setting, never dialing down the creepiness of the pet cemetery’s path in the backyard of the Creed’s home, or the mountainous range leading up to the Indian burial ground. Lambert also knocks certain nightmare sequences out of the park, including one dream sequence that is seared into this reviewer’s mind for years to come.

With a powerful horror novel to adapt and personal themes that abound in King’s story, Pet Sematary is a horror film adaptation that, while effective in dealing scares and gore, keeps it’s underlying message of death and it’s effect on people close to it’s chest as well. The film can feel a bit like a “Cliff Notes” version in certain moments in the plot, but Sematary brings it’s powerful story from beginning to end in powerful, yet horrific fashion.

8/10
  #5301  
Old 10-01-2012, 09:44 PM
#3



8/10
  #5302  
Old 10-01-2012, 09:51 PM
The Tree of Life



This is only my second time watching it and I have to say, I absolutely love it. The first time I thought it was overly ambiguous and impersonal thus leading to a lack of a real audience, but, when applying religious, scientific, and multiple other disciplines to understand it, it can be rather fun creating your own interpretation.

10/10
  #5303  
Old 10-01-2012, 11:54 PM

I Walked with a Zombie(1943)-7/10
  #5304  
Old 10-02-2012, 01:41 AM
Mad Max (AUS, 1979)

The now seminal dystopian semi futuristic Aussie vehicle based action thriller that brought Gibson into the limelight...plus its a dam good franchise.

A story that has now been ripped many times over right down to the last detail. We all know it, 'Max' is a leather bound cop in Oz who takes down nutters in his souped up Holden Monaro with the aid of his other fellow leather bound cops. A gang of bikers invade the peace of the territory and end up killing 'Max's' wife and child plus others which of course means revenge.

A simple premise but at the time the whole look and feel of the film was different if not totally original. The film mainly deals with 'Max's' peaceful life with his family and how society has broken down due to oil shortages. Actually somewhat slow for the most part, the start and finish are the high points.

The film kicks off with blistering pace as we get some fantastic car action with the now cult vehicles. Much like Japanese super saloons the cars aren't the prettiest to look at but they've got it where it counts. Great low camera angles, editing, deep rasping engine sounds and the odd bit of film speed up really do make these sequences feel gritty and real. The low budget seriously helps the film and certainly lives up to the notion that when you have little money you must be more creative which in the end will make a film look better.

Love the shots of 'Max' as he sits calmly in his car waiting for 'Nightrider'. Puts on his leather driving gloves, preps the car and then the still close up shot of his eyes behind tinted shades...reminds me of 'Drive'.

I have always thought this film does tend to lag through the middle as said before. After the initial turbo charged action the film sits back on the plot, this isn't bad as you do get character build up for the events to come but you can't help but yearn for more carnage.

Its hard to place this film if you ask me, the second is the best by miles and this one is also very good but its also a tad weak. The bad guys are fun but not really too threatening especially as they're on bikes. Hugh Keays-Byrne does add much needed flavour to the bad guys but I always felt he doesn't really do enough, just sits around and pulls faces. The way they kill 'Max's' wife and kid isn't very realistic either, not on bikes anyway.

The ending gets back into gear as 'Max' gets his revenge, what you've been waiting for the whole time. Whipping out the trusty Pursuit Special he tears up the highway and does what needs to be done in a reasonably satisfying fashion. The film may have been violent for the time but nowadays its very tame with obvious dummy usage.

The film doesn't date too badly, the cars are awesome and is it me or has there always been a kind of homosexual vibe to these films haha. A big butch leather bound bald guy with a thick handlebar moustache and the name of 'Fifi', it does make you wonder. The all male biker gang that wear makeup and stroke each other a lot haha and I've not even started on the sequel!

A solid entry made even better by the fact it came from nowhere with little budget. Just a tiny bit dull in the middle.
  #5305  
Old 10-02-2012, 07:19 AM
#4



8/10
  #5306  
Old 10-02-2012, 08:44 AM
Wake Wood - 7.5/10
  #5307  
Old 10-02-2012, 09:01 AM
#5



8/10
  #5308  
Old 10-02-2012, 01:33 PM


This is a great companion piece to Kaneto Shindo's Onibaba. I happen to prefer the earlier film, mostly because of the settings and atmosphere, but there's a lot to admire here. The film starts off strong, with a grim and brutal opening scene that's well done. It sets the mood for what is to follow.

Whereas Onibaba is very much a slow burn film, this movie sort of jumps right into the supernatural elements, which I think actually helps the film remain unpredictable. You're not sure exactly where the story is taking you. The first few attacks on the Samurai are well done, suspenseful, and I like how they seem to get easier as time goes on.

Once the protagonist comes into play, the viewer is conflicted; up until now, you can sympathize towards the ghosts, because of what happened to them, and we have no investment in the Samurai they attack. However Gintoki seems like a good guy and you kind of want to see him reunite with his family.

Gintoki's orders to slay the ghosts while still being in love with his wife, and his wife's sacrifice to immortality just to share a few nights with him, add some interesting depth to what could be a typical ghost story.

The finale is creepy, if a bit bewildering. It's a bit frustrating to see Gintoki open the temple to what must obviously be the remaining ghost. But I don't think it really hurts the film much. I do prefer Onibaba, but this film is different, and good enough to stand on its own, and is certainly worth a viewing.
  #5309  
Old 10-02-2012, 02:39 PM
The Serpent’s Egg



A dreary affair like a lot of Bergman’s work, but the passion that is usually self-evident in his prior films seems lost in non-Swedish translation here, with the odd casting choice of David Carradine as unemployed trapeze artist Abel Rosenberg being a conspicuous cherry on top. It’s a solid performance, but the opaque characterization on the page didn’t do Carradine any favors. It portrays Abel as a cynical study of film noir cool one minute, then an aggressive, unpredictable paranoid the next while he fumbles through drunken nights and bitter days to find out why his late brother committed suicide in downtrodden 1920’s Berlin. Bergman does deliver one of the best endings of his career though, a chilling snatch of prophetic poetry that seeks to explain the reasons why civil societies can turn out of hopelessness and fear right into the arms of unimaginable evil. In this case, it’s clearly about the rise of Nazi rule pre-WWII, but it is a scary notion to think about in general, and Bergman puts it right in your face to quietly marinate on long after. Which is probably the only truly lasting impression I’ll have about the film. Oh, and that Goldfinger himself, Gert Frobe (playing a German detective) looks so much like James “Lord Commander Mormont” Cosmo from Game of Thrones it’s fucking scary.

-> 6/10
  #5310  
Old 10-02-2012, 03:34 PM
Machete (Ethan Maniquis & Robert Rodriguez, 2010)



Not really as good as the trailer I saw five years ago made it out to be, Trejo in a lead role has a lot more potential and some of the stuff was really cringe-worthy even if that was the point. However, the exploitation tropes were frequent and fun enough to make it an enjoyable enough watch for me to look forward to the sequel. I was pleasantly surprised by Steven Seagal's performance too.
7/10
  #5311  
Old 10-02-2012, 04:17 PM

Trouble with the Curve(2012)-6/10
  #5312  
Old 10-02-2012, 07:01 PM


John Carpenter is a horror director that makes good on the potential of the scripts that he receives. He understands how the story’s concept is everything, and he, for most of his career, seemed to go above and beyond to ensure that vision is held intact. Most of his works were classics, The Thing being a prime and excellent example, but there are some of his films that seem to miss more than hit. Enter Prince of Darkness, a film that Carpenter directed and wrote that tries to balance the concept of religion and science. While the potential, and nifty horror shenanigans are certainly there, the lack of engaging leads and a dawdling script keeps the film from being truly great.

What would happen if there was a canister that contained the essence of hell in liquid form? This is the question that Carpenter asks to the audience, having a group of graduate students, as well as their physics professor (Victor Wong) helping a terrified priest (Donald Pleasance) in searching the answers to the canister. Carpenter opens the door for questions regarding philosophy in physics and religion as well. He keeps at an even keel on each of the beliefs, never having one ideal feel superior to the other.

Carpenter also implements a bit of The Thing in terms of group dynamics involving the scientists. But, while The Thing threw the viewer right into the cast, never really having one particular protagonist to follow; Carpenter develops a more difficult time in bringing distinct personalities in the large group. Most of them weave in and out of the story, most being fodder for the evil element that resides in the canister. There are two (and maybe three) characters that are given more than one simple dimension, but they’re mostly regulated to the background in order to make as much time for the rest of the minor characters.

Thankfully, Carpenter still has the eye for some good old’ fashioned horror visuals to keep the horror buffs happy. It isn’t a Carpenter film if there aren’t some ominous silhouettes in the background, as well as some grotesque body horror that are the highlights of the film. But, it isn’t just the ultra violence that Carpenter is interested in, as he delves in one ongoing dream sequences that oozes creepy and unsettledness.

Most of Carpenter’s go-to cast members are on hand in this film, with the always-reliable “Dr. Loomis” Donald Pleasence as the priest who discovers the secret canister. Pleasence can do this type of role in his sleep, so it’s no surprise that he’s great in the role. On the scientific side is Carpenter’s Big Trouble in Little China Town’s Victor Wong as the physics teacher. Wong brings a more subtle approach to this role than in China, and it’s surprisingly nuanced and solid. The rest of the cast doesn’t really make a mark apart from one or tow actors, and that’s only to have some semblance of a connection to a house full of “red shirts” (aka expendable characters).

Prince of Darkness is far from being a terrible Carpenter film; it’s just a film that doesn’t have as much meat that it thinks it should. The ideas are potentially great, but with no backbone of characters to anchor the story, the film never shakes things up apart from one or two nifty horror sequences. It’s not high caliber Carpenter, but it’s definitely worth a look if you’re interested in the rest of the director’s filmography, or want to see and decide the film for yourself.

6/10
  #5313  
Old 10-02-2012, 07:44 PM
The Seventh Seal



First time watching this.

9/10
  #5314  
Old 10-02-2012, 08:33 PM
Me and My Gal with Spencer Tracy - Tracy is a policeman who falls for a waitress and must also deal with her sister's involvement with a gangster. It wasn't very exciting but Tracy always manages to make any of his movies at least decent. 5/10

The Edge of Love - A fictional account of Dylan Thomas' relationship with his wife, his childhood friend, and her husband. This film definitely belonged to the two women Keira Knightley and Sienna Miller. They were very good and I liked the relationship between them. 7/10
  #5315  
Old 10-02-2012, 10:55 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveyJoeG View Post
Good flick, have you seen Kwaidan or Jigoku ? two of my favorites
  #5316  
Old 10-03-2012, 12:54 AM

The Leopard Man(1943)-8/10
  #5317  
Old 10-03-2012, 06:56 AM
The Innkeepers - 8.5/10
  #5318  
Old 10-03-2012, 10:16 AM
#6



9/10
  #5319  
Old 10-03-2012, 11:19 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Digifruitella View Post
Good flick, have you seen Kwaidan or Jigoku ? two of my favorites
Yes! I actually own both of those on DVD, very cool movies. I'm especially a fan of Kwaidan, and Masaki Kobyashi in general. That film has such a wonderfully spooky atmosphere, and it's gorgeous to look at.
  #5320  
Old 10-03-2012, 11:43 AM
Mad Max 2: The Road Warrior (AUS, 1981)

The story continues as 'Max Rockatansky' is now a roaming lone wolf, a highway mercenary who does what he can for precious fuel and to survive.

For me this is easily the best of the trilogy as it gives you everything you kinda wanted from the first but didn't quite get. This film has become a legend over time, how many films, videogames, boardgames, TV shows etc...have used this formula and style since!.

The plot is even more basic than the first film and dispatches any notion of family, love or even friendship really. 'Max' is purely a roamer who cares for nothing but his dog and Ford Falcon, gas and sustenance are his goals. In short 'Max' reluctantly gains a friend in the form of the 'Giro Captain' and is shown a source of much gasoline. Again reluctantly he ends up helping the small band of protectors that hold the gas from a vicious gang of bondage clad desert thugs. All for more gas.

In short this film is virtually a constant set up for stunts, action and chase sequences, nothing much more than that. Definitely original in its time, all vehicles and costumes like this are now basically synonymous with this franchise. The used, dirty, seedy, gritty, rusty machine like world of the future also leans towards a Roman gladiatorial type look. The new gang of ultra thugs are a mix of American Indian, Roman gladiator, 'Rollerball' looking types that again also tend to appear very homosexual like the first.

Who can forget the iconic lunacy of Vernon Wells' character with his mohawk, leather chaps with bare thong clad ass showing and of course his collared blonde male bitch by his side haha. His utter madness and violent tendencies make him a scary gay loose cannon from hell as he lets out his war cries.
The rest of the bad guys are merely death fodder that end up getting blown up or crushed under vehicle tyres, but the costumes are all so unique and well imagined mixing fetish bondage gear with biker gear. Very cliched now of course but anything like this would come under the term 'Max Mad style'.

The bad guys easily make the film with their appearance and constant assaults, swarming over anything like ants. Their leader again is another brilliant visual treat and again totally homosexual looking. A huge tanned muscle bound man who speaks well, dresses in yet more black spiky strapped bondage gear and wears a hockey mask making him one of the best movie mysteries around. Who is this guy? what happened to him? and with the name 'Humungus' you again tend to think if that has anything to do with the gay theme. Naturally I have also wondered if the hockey mask idea had been pinched from a certain horror movie made the year before.

The good guys are more bland and boring with their stereotypical white outfits which indicate that they are clearly the goodies hehe. Baddies in black, goodies in white...oh the good old days of cliched action films. The 'Feral kid' character being rather annoying I must admit, the story is narrated by an older version of himself which is kinda neat but the actual character was just weird, but I guess that was the idea.

The film goes from one set piece to the next and not pausing much for breathe. The outback setting really works wonders for the film and gives a really nice bleak barren dystopian future feel. Of course the final tanker chase sequence is the most memorable and iconic action sequence of the film. Much like the iconic Indy truck chase sequence in 'Raiders' our hero takes on one bad guy after another as they try to derail the tanker resulting in some epic over the top carnage. What was also so original about this film was the fact that all the good guys that help 'Max' in this final chase get killed...including the hot female!.

Not even 'Max's' trusty old dog survives the ordeal. These darn movie men always know how to get a viewer upset and against the bad guys, have them kill an innocent doggie. Dam them and their cliched overused movie trickery!!!.

This is pretty much the perfect action film with everything needed and supplied with class. A small budget again proves better results tend to get achieved, it really does look like they just got a load of cars and buggy's and just stuck a whole lot of metal crap all over them.

Sparse in every sense, little dialog, a tough hero with no name type (although we do know his name I don't think its mentioned) and locations that are alien and rich with imagination. A fantasy barbarian film with guns instead of swords and fetish gear instead of loincloths. The ultimate used heavy metal junkyard post apocalyptic universe that influenced everything.
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