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  #1  
Old 10-12-2012, 11:23 PM
I'm Sorry Guys, But BLURAY DVD Doesn't Impress Me Much

I'm Sorry Guys, But BLURAY DVD Doesn't Impress Me Much

I want to begin this minor rant about a major thing by saying that I have only just begun to collect some of my favorite movies on BLURAY DVD. My very very first viewing of a BLURAY DVD movie was the crappy Ghostrider 2 a few months ago. But having said that, it was quite a marvel to behold this new format on my new big screen hd tv. Being a late comer to this new format, I was literally taken a back by the clarity, and absolute beautiful picture I was watching. So here it goes. I decided only just yesterday to purchase 4 new BLURAY DVD movies. The titles are as follows. These were $10 each, and sealed in plastic, from JB HIFI AUSTRALIA.

Heat
Descent (2005)
Troy (ext dir cut)
Dawn of the Dead (2004)

They are a humble beginning I grant you. Now, what I want to know is why does my copy of Descent and Heat look practically no better than my dvd versions of them? I am so sick and tired of hearing that BLURAY is 3 times the picture quality. Wtf? Not mine. Troy extended cut looks superb. And DOTD looks marginally better than my dvd cut. Oh, I also have Star Wars on BLURAY. Got them with my player. They are also very very good I have to admit. So are all BLURAYS imind-blowing, good or average? So far, I am not impressed at all really. Why should I go out and buy my favs on BLURAY when some of them don't look much better than on my dvds? I have over 5000 dvds store bought. Why the fuck should I update? I am more than happy with my collection.

I guess this topic can be moved to either rant or dvd discussion. Whatever...

Last edited by God of War; 12-01-2012 at 11:31 PM..
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  #2  
Old 10-12-2012, 11:42 PM
My blu-ray player "enhances" my DVDs to where they do look better, but I believe that the blu-ray discs look and sound better than my DVDs. I'm not saying the difference between blu-ray and DVD is huge, but I think there's enough of a difference to where blu-ray is worth it.
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  #3  
Old 10-12-2012, 11:46 PM
It really depends on what you get. Movies with gorgeous cinematography obviously are the ones to buy on Blu-ray. All the ones mentioned above are pretty standard looking. Movies like Avatar, Hugo, True Grit, Tree of Life, Pixar films, etc. are worth the difference in price.

For me I'm counting down the seconds until Lawrence of Arabia is released on Blu-Ray exactly one month from now.
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  #4  
Old 10-13-2012, 01:07 AM
I found this information at the link below. Now I am even more confused than ever before. You stated, Creeky, that my titles are pretty standard looking. Troy looks good on BLURAY DVD. But given that the format in general is far superior, why wouldn't almost all BLURAY DVDS look much betetr than their dvd counterparts? It's like getting a VHS copy of Braveheart, then seeing it on dvd. It looked better, cleaner etc. Now is Braveheart much better again on BLURAY? All movies should look way better, yet you state that the few I just purchased are standard. So, you're telling me that it can vary greatly from title to title?

Then why does my BLURAY copy of the Descent have loads of grain it? Wtf? Even my dvd doesn't have that. I am understandably confused with all of this.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Why should I upgrade from DVD to Blu-ray?

The simple answer is HDTV. If you've ever seen high-definition (HD) video on an HDTV, then you know just how incredibly sharp the picture is and how vivid the colors are. In fact, HD offers five times the amount of detail compared to standard-definition (SD). The problem with today's DVDs is that they only support SD and don't have the necessary storage capacity to satisfy the needs of HD. That's where Blu-ray comes in, it offers up to 50GB of storage capacity and enables playback, recording and rewriting of HD in all of the HD resolutions including 1080p. The format also supports high-definition audio formats and lossless audio.

In addition to the greater video and audio quality, the extra storage capacity also means there will be plenty of room for additional content and special features. This combined with the new BD-J interactivity layer adopted by Blu-ray will bring the menus, graphics and special features to a whole new level. For example, you will be able to bring up the menu system as an overlay without stopping the movie, and you could have the director of the movie on the screen explaining the shooting of a scene while the scene is playing in the background. The advanced interactivity combined with the networking features of Blu-ray will also allow content producers to support new innovative features such as downloading extras, updating content via the web, and watching live broadcasts of special events.

Thanks to the greatly enhanced HD video and audio quality as well as the advanced interactivity and networking features, Blu-ray represents a huge leap forward in the DVD viewing experience and will offer consumers an unprecedented HD experience.

http://www.blu-ray.com/faq/#bluray_vs_dvd
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  #5  
Old 10-13-2012, 01:36 AM
C'mon, guys. I need some quality advice here on what I should do. Please.
I only want to buy a few of my favorite movies on BLURAY. But I am very hesitant now.
Hmm.
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  #6  
Old 10-13-2012, 01:57 AM
Go to blu-ray.com and check their reviews for the video quality of the movies. Some BR titles might not be worth the upgrade. For instance, I haven't replaced Ghostbusters, even though its a favorite, because they say the BR transfer is pretty bad. Think of it in terms of how some of the first generation DVDs didn't look that good (Goodfellas, which was on a 2-sided disc, was one of my first DVD disappointments)

For instance, on the site, here's what they say about...

Heat:
Quote:
Your appreciation of Warner's 1080p/VC-1 transfer will largely come down to the nature of your expectations. Anyone hoping for a faithful rendering of Mann's grim-n-gritty aesthetics, bleached palette, and oppressive shadows will be enamored with the results, while those looking for the latest and greatest high definition presentation will be slightly underwhelmed.
Although, they did praise Descent. I haven't seen the movie, but they do say it's a drab looking film that's often very dark, so it might just be that you don't notice much different because it's an ugly looking film to begin with. (?)

There is also the factor that while some BR's may not look better on a 32" HDTV, or maybe even 40" (and this all depends on how far you are sitting from the screen) the bigger your TV is, the more difference it will make.

KC Masterpiece is pretty much where I got schooled on that site above, and I think it's been very helpful for me in terms of saving money. There's so far been very few titles I've replaced. The site is also good for listing sales on BRs.

In the end though, I think $10 for great titles is a good deal, even if it's DVD quality. I wouldn't think twice to pick Heat up if I didn't already own it.
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  #7  
Old 10-13-2012, 02:03 AM
I mean if you got a Marx brothers movie on Blu-ray its not going to look amazing or if you bought Paranormal Activity or the Blair Witch Project. I have about a dozen or so blu-rays and a lot of them aren't my top favorites but they're among my top favorite visual films or were just really cheap blu-rays. Grainy and gritty films aren't going to be worth a blu-ray buy. The movie Narc for example probably looks almost exactly the same as it does on dvd and Blu-ray especially to the untrained eye. Sound quality is a factor as well but you really want to get films that have amazing cinematography.

My suggestion is do that free netflix for a month thing and rent some blu-rays. If you already did that your local library should have some blu-rays available to borrow for free. Also of course if you have to have everything set up correctly with an HDMI cable with the proper settings and everything... if you're still not that satisfied with blu-ray then don't bother. If you expected the same jump in quality from VHS to DVD with DVD to Blu-Ray its understandable you'd be disappointed.

Last edited by creekin111; 10-13-2012 at 02:08 AM..
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  #8  
Old 10-13-2012, 02:43 AM
Just because it's blu-ray don't instantly assume it'll be a huge leap above the DVD release, even with popular/big films they sometimes screw them up (fuck DNR)/half ass them.

Read reviews (the already mentioned blu-ray.com is great and they tend to have a lot of screencaps) and look at comparisons to give you an idea of whether or not it's worth the upgrade, http://www.dvdbeaver.com/ has side by side image comparisons between DVDs/Blu-ray releases.
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  #9  
Old 10-13-2012, 02:49 AM
Remember God of War, grain will be present on blu ray if that is the director's intent.
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  #10  
Old 10-13-2012, 04:02 AM
always read user reviews on a Blu-Ray disc your interested in buying. for example, i too wanted to purchase Heat on Blu-Ray. however, i read several user reviews on Amazon.com that bascially said save your money because the transfer is no good. i just kept my my regular DVD and passed on the Blu-Ray.

i'm not sure what sort of televison you have, but perhaps you should look into a professional calibration. if you're always watching DVD's/Blu-Ray's, might be worth looking into. having your tele calibrated can be a night & day difference as far as picture quality.
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  #11  
Old 10-13-2012, 08:56 AM
Blurays have far better resolution and video compression than DVDs. If a bluray doesn't look significantly better than the DVD, then it is:

1) An incompetently compressed video (some DVDs even had this problem where they looked worse than VHS, Total Recall's first DVD release was horrible)

2) Your TV could be the problem. Some HD TVs can rip an image to shreds. If you always see artifacts or excessive noise around the edges of images on your screen, then get a better TV. FYI, if you don't have an HD TV, then you shouldn't see any real difference between Bluray & DVD.

Also, grain comes from film. If it was shot on film, then you will see grain. Some movies artificially remove the grain for the bluray (some fans hate when the grain is removed). But grain a is part of the film format. You'll even see grain in a theater, especially if it uses a film projector.

The Descent is a movie shot in a lot of darkness, so the grain would be major. Again, some people love the grain, it gives texture to the movie (especially if it is a horror movie). For 'Black Swan' Aronofsky added grain to the scenes shot digitally so that it matched the rest of the movie (which was shot on film).

Also, Digital even has its version of grain called noise. Most newer digital cinema cameras have nearly eliminated noise, but it is still slightly there.

You don't see often see grain on DVD because the image is shrunken and compressed so much that small details like grain can't be seen.

Last edited by Silverload; 10-13-2012 at 09:02 AM..
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  #12  
Old 10-13-2012, 10:23 AM
On the movies I have purchased I have noticed a huge difference over their DVD counterpart.

Shawshank Redemption was surprisingly nice. I picked it up on Bluray for $8 just to have another copy but when I watched it I was blown away. Especially the scene at the beginning when the camera follows the driveway up to the prison and then shows a aerial shot of the prison, just amazing looking. Also the tarring the roof scene and Red's journey to the tree. They really stood out.

The others I have picked up that were better than DVD imo (for visual quality) were Inception, Kick Ass, Terminator 2, and Watchmen. Those were the ones that had a noticeable difference, not just a slight difference.
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  #13  
Old 10-13-2012, 03:38 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hucksta G View Post
Remember God of War, grain will be present on blu ray if that is the director's intent.


"Whuuudup!?"
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  #14  
Old 10-13-2012, 09:16 PM
Amended: Going back to Blu-Ray cuz I'm an indecisive sonuvabitch!

Last edited by jaw2929; 10-20-2012 at 03:18 PM..
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  #15  
Old 10-15-2012, 10:12 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaw2929 View Post
The other reason is because of the selection of titles as well as the price of DVD vs. Blu-Ray. Especially when it comes to used movies! Give me Fight Club for say $8 used on DVD over the same on Blu-Ray for $15 used any day!

You need to shop around. I own quite a few Blurays and haven't paid more than $8 for any of them and that is new. The titles I mentioned above included and those are not some no name crap. The WB Store has great sales on their new blurays. I also picked up the entire last season of Smallville for $12. If you have Amazon Prime, when they sell their blurays for $8 you get free 2 day shipping on them so you can't beat that and they throw up several awesome ones weekly for $8-$10.

Check these out, all under $10

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=MoviesBD...d_i=2901953011

Last edited by MovieMaster; 10-15-2012 at 10:14 AM..
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  #16  
Old 10-15-2012, 10:55 AM
Like stated above...use bluray.com. The site is incredible...great reviews and active price tracking.

My personal advice to you....don't worry about upgrading old titles, unless you feel the urge to...the film stock is dated and not all the titles are going to look amazing transferred to HD...95% of the Blu's I own are all recent releases that should look great in High Definition.
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  #17  
Old 10-15-2012, 07:23 PM
Plus there getting rid of DVDs and it has been replaced by Bluray dvds

i went into Target the other days and couldnt find movies with the DVD brand only the Blu ray excists meaning that l will have to buy another dvd player that plays Bluray dvds..

Why do they have to change things all of the time
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  #18  
Old 10-16-2012, 01:01 AM
The Dark Knight trilogy is available for pre-order at Amazon for $29.99. There's supposed to be another SE set coming out 3rd quarter 2013, but since the DKR is $24.99 and I don't have the first 2 on BR... fished in!
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  #19  
Old 10-16-2012, 08:38 PM
One of the biggest differences I've seen in terms of DVD quality vs Blu-Ray Quality: A Clockwork Orange.

And any Pixar movie or There Will Be Blood in Blu-Ray on a 46+" HDTV will show you why you should go blu-ray. Some of my updated titles on blu-ray seem like godsends. The Criterion collection is worth the price alone because of the great care that goes into their transfers. There's 400+ Criterion titles available on blu-ray now if I'm not mistaken. And Criterion adds titles every month.
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  #20  
Old 10-16-2012, 09:47 PM
Many people say they don't see a difference in quality.
To each his/her own. Also, they WAY your rig is set up can make a big difference.
The bigger the screen, the bigger the difference. Also make sure the video settings are adequate; you can have a $19,000 TV but if it's not properly adjusted, shit will still look like crap.

With that said, I would recommend watching a movie that you've seen several times on DVD, then get the blu ray based on reviews from blu-ray.com. They are reliable.

A big difference to me was BLADE RUNNER. It's fantastic. But there are hundreds of movies now that blow the DVD format out of the water.
Some aren't great, but most are at least a noticeable improvement, if not a drastic one.
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  #21  
Old 10-16-2012, 10:24 PM
I like my dvd collection but fuck blue-ray .... if dvd was a cute girl , BR is just a cute girl with big tits. I'm already in real digital and surfing the clouds.

so much money sunk into



NO MORE !!!
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  #22  
Old 10-16-2012, 10:28 PM
Nice collection there Dirty. I love those shelves.
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  #23  
Old 10-16-2012, 10:48 PM
I have over 700 DVDs. I now have about 250 BRs.
Just because I'm almost exclusively BR now doesn't mean DVD is pointless. I love replacing them with the far superior BRs when they are $6 to $9 bucks. It's great!
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  #24  
Old 10-16-2012, 10:48 PM
i have to admit ... i worked hard for that picture. Stupid flash ruined it ! I must have put at least 35 dvds away ( i regret or not cool ... perfection is hard). Shelves are 15$/each at Ikea btw. Try to spot Shivers by Cronenberg ... hint : it's a french sleeve
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  #25  
Old 10-17-2012, 12:39 AM

Thank you, everyone for all of your help so far. I will get back to each of you and your comments on an individual basis.
Much food for thought posted above. And it has helped me out a great deal. I am a noob when it comes to BLURAY. So, yeah
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  #26  
Old 10-17-2012, 12:14 PM
Is your Blu-ray player hooked up to your TV with an HDMI cable? If not, that could be the problem. If you're connecting it with just RCA (the red, white, and yellow cords), the difference won't be that dramatic. With HDMI, you're getting the full HD experience, assuming your TV is equipped for it. If you don't have an HDMI cable, you can get them for pretty cheap at Target, Wal-Mart, Best Buy, etc.

And as others have pointed out already, it also depends on the movie/disc. I still own a lot of my DVD's because I don't really see the point in going out of my way to upgrade them since they're not really visually dynamic films. On the other hand, I used to own WALL-E on DVD, and once I upgraded to Blu-ray, it was like watching a different movie. The difference on that one is pretty substantial.

What it really comes down to is how much you care about sharp, detailed picture. Of course the difference between Blu-ray and DVD isn't as drastic as the difference between DVD and VHS (especially if you're playing your DVD's on a Blu-ray player, which automatically boosts their quality), but there are plenty of movies that I would say look undeniably better on Blu-ray. The question is whether or not you care that much about the enhanced quality.

I can't speak to this personally since I don't own the Blu-ray, but if you like the movie and can get hold of it for a decent price, check out the Criterion Blu-ray edition of The Thin Red Line. Many Blu-ray aficionados, including the people at both blu-ray.com and criterionforum.org, have suggested that it's possibly the best-looking Blu-ray on the market.

Last edited by Tkeyjw; 10-17-2012 at 12:18 PM..
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  #27  
Old 10-18-2012, 01:26 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dirtyfrog View Post
i have to admit ... i worked hard for that picture. Stupid flash ruined it ! I must have put at least 35 dvds away ( i regret or not cool ... perfection is hard). Shelves are 15$/each at Ikea btw. Try to spot Shivers by Cronenberg ... hint : it's a french sleeve
Nice, I need to go to Ikea!
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  #28  
Old 10-18-2012, 01:52 AM
I'm not interested in buying the same movies over again.
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  #29  
Old 10-18-2012, 01:55 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by rocknblues81 View Post
I'm not interested in buying the same movies over again.
There's a good thing about this; you have a CHOICE!

It's funny, though. I remember when DVD first came out and these boards were full of arguments EXACTLY like the blu-ray ones now. Exact same comments and thread titles. Except it was vs. VHS.
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  #30  
Old 10-18-2012, 02:19 AM
There's lots of things funny about it. The idea that every movie someone owns are the only movies they will ever want to own. The idea of magical DVD players that last forever. And especially funny, luddites on the Internet.
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  #31  
Old 10-18-2012, 03:30 AM
Its going to be a very long slow death for DVDs. Nothing like it was with VHS. Blu-rays and dvd are the same format and can be played in a Blu-ray player. You can't exactly pop in a VHS tape into a dvd player... well you could try but not sure what that would accomplish. They actually still have VHS tapes for rent at my local library. I think dvds/blu-rays will still be around by the time I'm dead and buried. Someday Hollywood is going to embrace legal electronic ownership of films like the music industry does with music but right now on demand renting or disc purchasing seems the way to go for the time being.

Eventually I want to put all my dvds on a portable hard drive. I don't care much for extra features so they'll just be the main features. I'd pretty much need a 10+ TB hard drive to store all my movies so I wanna wait a bit for those to come down in price. I have so many dvds and they take up so much room on my shelves.
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  #32  
Old 10-18-2012, 05:42 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by creekin111 View Post
Eventually I want to put all my dvds on a portable hard drive. I don't care much for extra features so they'll just be the main features. I'd pretty much need a 10+ TB hard drive to store all my movies so I wanna wait a bit for those to come down in price. I have so many dvds and they take up so much room on my shelves.
I did this over the summer. There's quite a few DVDs that I have ripped whole, including the menus, etc. It was somewhat liberating but in a way there's something missing there without the experience of having them in hand. I can't quite say exactly but it's almost like it makes it harder to navigate through my library. It's easier on one hand, but having the whole library there at the touch of a button almost makes it overwhelming. If you have Netflix, you might get what I mean if you have ever found yourself sorting through you queue, finding it hard to narrow down what you want to watch.

At the same time though, having that extra shelf space is really great and it's so much easier when you know what you want to watch. I guess there's a spontaneity that's maybe missing, but it might just be that it's such a huge shift from how I've been used to selecting movies.

The best I can compare it to is old school video stores with thousands of titles and going in unsure of what you want to watch -- I used to find myself spending over an hour scanning the aisles. The difference now though, is that once I find the movie, there's now the increased ability to change my mind mid-film. There's no waiting for the store to open back up, driving to get there, etc.. Not even the concern to get up and take the disc out of the player. So it's like it makes it easier to stop a movie than to start a movie.

Still though, I'm glad I did it.
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  #33  
Old 10-18-2012, 07:09 AM
I threw away all but 30 of my DVD cases. I keep all the DVDs themselves in four large CD binders, each alphabetically organized (with a couple spaces every other page for future expansion - which no longer really happens).

Massive space saver, that's for sure.

I have about 9TB of HD space. About 6TB are used up. I once had about 100 movies ripped from DVD on a 600GB HD, and then it crashed.
All 100 of those ripped movies were gone. Most I owned - because I wanted to save space - but I always keep backups of my shit.
I have had about three other hard drive failures/crashes in the last 6 years. It's not uncommon.

So, I would recommend keeping the discs. But maybe not the cases if you want to save space.
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  #34  
Old 10-18-2012, 07:16 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postmaster General View Post
I did this over the summer. There's quite a few DVDs that I have ripped whole, including the menus, etc. It was somewhat liberating but in a way there's something missing there without the experience of having them in hand. I can't quite say exactly but it's almost like it makes it harder to navigate through my library. It's easier on one hand, but having the whole library there at the touch of a button almost makes it overwhelming. If you have Netflix, you might get what I mean if you have ever found yourself sorting through you queue, finding it hard to narrow down what you want to watch.

At the same time though, having that extra shelf space is really great and it's so much easier when you know what you want to watch. I guess there's a spontaneity that's maybe missing, but it might just be that it's such a huge shift from how I've been used to selecting movies.

The best I can compare it to is old school video stores with thousands of titles and going in unsure of what you want to watch -- I used to find myself spending over an hour scanning the aisles. The difference now though, is that once I find the movie, there's now the increased ability to change my mind mid-film. There's no waiting for the store to open back up, driving to get there, etc.. Not even the concern to get up and take the disc out of the player. So it's like it makes it easier to stop a movie than to start a movie.

Still though, I'm glad I did it.
What's the best ripping program? Or free ripping program? I find there are some don't have the smoothest motion.
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  #35  
Old 10-18-2012, 10:43 PM
I only buy a Blu Ray when I know its a movie that will look superior. Its not very often though, I reckon for every 10 movies I buy on DVD, I only buy 1 on Blu Ray.

Dont bother changing your DVD collection to Blu Ray, its a waste. Only do it for your favorite movies and one's that you know will make the most of the format (i.e. Hugo, Avatar etc.)
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  #36  
Old 10-19-2012, 01:18 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by creekin111 View Post
What's the best ripping program? Or free ripping program? I find there are some don't have the smoothest motion.
I'm in OSX so I use RipIt which has never given me any problems, but this is only for full DVD rips. I then, for discs I want just a copy of the movie, I use Ivi Pro, mainly because it automatically imports the metadata and sends it to iTunes, so it saves me some hassle there.

Otherwise, for just getting a digital copy off a disc, I'd say it doesn't get any better than Handbrake, which is available on both mac and PC.

For the life of me, I don't understand why someone hasn't made a program where you can rip and disc, but convert the files while maintaining the menus, special features and so forth --- Instead of having MPEG files inside the DVD hierarchy, it's mp4. That would be a lifesaver for this process.
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  #37  
Old 10-19-2012, 06:12 AM
okay so you're got a blu-ray player, that don't impress me much......
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  #38  
Old 10-19-2012, 06:14 AM
^
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  #39  
Old 10-19-2012, 06:36 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by creekin111 View Post
What's the best ripping program? Or free ripping program? I find there are some don't have the smoothest motion.

I have used DVD Decrypter and DVD Shrink for a long time with no issues. Ripit4me uses those two programs to streamline to burning into like 2 button clicks if you want an easy copy.
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  #40  
Old 10-19-2012, 07:31 AM
The difference is not near as pronounced as going from analog to HD but there is a difference. Whether or not it is worth it I think depends on the film, as mentioned above. If you are unsure of whether to spend the money or not, use a torrent, rip it and check it out first, then decide to buy it or not.

But the fact remains, there is a difference. Bluray produces a sharper image and better sound than standard DVD.
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