#1  
Old 10-25-2012, 12:19 PM
Flight



Directed by Robert Zemeckis

Written by John Gatins

Plot: An airline pilot saves a flight from crashing, but an investigation into the malfunctions reveals something troubling.

Starring: Denzel Washington, Don Cheadle, Kelly Reilly, John Goodman, Bruce Greenwood, Melissa Leo

Rated R for drug and alcohol abuse, language, sexuality/nudity and an intense action sequence

Runtime: 139 minutes


Sounds like a welcome return to live action for Zemeckis. I'm quite honestly sick of seeing the trailer (reaching Shutter Island or The Soloist levels of play).
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  #2  
Old 10-25-2012, 07:52 PM
Can't wait.

Just read that they are dropping it into 1800 theatres. This makes no sense at all. This should make $20-30 million, easily, with a 3000 theatre count. They've been marketing the hell out of it, it has a very interesting concept, the reviews are great, and you have a leading man who always opens well... why dump it?
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  #3  
Old 10-25-2012, 09:31 PM
I'm very pumped for this and agree with all that Bourne said, but does anyone know the actual runtime for this? I seem to find every other site alternating between 139 minutes and 93 minutes. Obviously a huge difference, and obviously we'd assume the longer one is correct, but does anyone know for sure??
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  #4  
Old 10-25-2012, 09:43 PM
Saw it a few weeks ago at NYFF - it's really good.

Kelly Reilly gives one of my favorite performances of the year and I'd love her to get a best supporting nomination.

Denzel is solid much better then his hack job in Safe House.

The screen play is top notch as well.

Full review - http://afterthecut.com/2012/10/14/ny...ght/#more-8734
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  #5  
Old 10-25-2012, 09:43 PM
film is 2 hrs and 20 mins long
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  #6  
Old 10-25-2012, 09:47 PM
.
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  #7  
Old 10-25-2012, 09:52 PM
Leave it to Robert Zemeckis to find a way to tell a story of alcoholism in a fresh and compelling manner.

It looks amazing.
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  #8  
Old 10-25-2012, 10:08 PM
I too have already seen this and after seeing it I said that Denzel was a lock for, at the very least, a Best Actor Nomination.

On Rotten Tomatoes they have the run time listed as 1 hour 33 minutes... and I was pretty shocked, cuz the cut I saw was way longer, so I am glad to see this thread reporting the movie is a more proper 2 hours 20 minutes.

The beginning is such a master work, with the plane going down, Zemeckis really shows he is a master.

I also dont get why they are dumping this is only 1800 theaters, it is a major release, from a major director and a major star. But I guess they want to start it out like that and then have it build from word of mouth, which it surely will.
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  #9  
Old 10-26-2012, 12:31 AM
Kind of interesting how the last time Robert Zemeckis made a live action movie, it too was centered on the aftermath of a plane crash.

Guy sure loves crashing planes.
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  #10  
Old 10-26-2012, 04:31 AM
I have also seen the film and for the most part disliked it. The plane crash and Denzel are strong.

My review:

Robert Zemeckis has always been a filmmaker that best uses technology to tell his stories. Even his more serious films in the 90s (Forrest Gump, Cast Away, What Lies Beneath) used clever tech and special effects throughout to effectively spin their yarns. For the last decade, Zemeckis has experimented with motion capture animation, and although the films were not well received overall (I like The Polar Express quite a bit) he clearly found it to be an artistically satisfying journey. The plane crash sequence at the center of Flight, Zemeckis’ first live action film in over 10 years, is a marvel of technology and Hollywood filmmaking. It is harrowing, visceral, violent, and believable. It gets under your skin and puts you right in the pilot seat alongside Denzel Washington’s Whip Whittaker. Oddly, this opening sequence, so masterfully crafted, is juxtaposed with a tonally dissimilar sequence involving Kelly Reilly’s Nicole, and it is unfortunately clear from the get go that something isn’t quite right here.

Flight is a story of substance abuse and addiction. This is mature and heavy material, and it is the type of story that has the ability to challenge and inspire adult audiences. You often hear the complaint that Hollywood doesn’t make studio films for adults anymore, and in that regard Flight is a refreshing proposition. This is Robert Zemeckis stripped down in a way he perhaps never has been before, focusing entirely on the human element. In its attempt to explore the horrors of alcohol addiction, though, Flight takes many missteps. I was surprised to realize the film is rated R, and it attempts to be mature and frank with its material. In many cases, though, it comes off as a bunch of kind actors playing dress up, struggling to connect with the realities of the material. Zemeckis is not able to create an appropriate tone that suits the dark material. Bizarre and unfortunate music choices (whether it be his penchant to rely on classic rock or Alan Silvestri’s overt and maudlin score) highlight zippy camera work and awkward editing that fail to capture the intimacy and raw moments that material like this requires.

John Gatins’ script is a mishmash of ugly platitudes and rote psychology. With each step and descent into the darkness Flight takes the obvious, surface level approach. Denzel Washington takes his cue from Zemeckis and attempts to strip down his normal tics and antics, and this is the most convincing and nuanced he has been in some time. The script constantly betrays him, however, and while Denzel attempts to dig deep into the psychological implications of a man in severe denial of his substance abuse problem and how it is affecting his life and the life of those around him he is left struggling to latch onto material that lacks intelligence or worth. The film plays more like a warning pamphlet than anything that is real, and it is filled with horrible contrivances and one-note characters. Denzel is never given the opportunity to play off of a character that truly challenges him, whether it be Kelly Reilly’s admirable attempt to give life to a confused and poorly drawn female addict or Don Cheadle’s bland lawyer. As an audience member I wanted to reach into the screen and instill some life or soul into these characters, but instead they are walking screenwriting 101 archetypes. Only John Goodman has any spark in him, but in his 2 brief appearances he is hilariously cartoonish and makes no sense in the context of the film.

I don’t pretend to be an expert on alcohol or addiction, but I do know humans and have suffered my fair share of pain, confusion, and loneliness. The human element in Flight constantly rings false, and is filled with unfortunate and obvious Hollywood mawkishness. The film constantly struggles to connect to something real but ends up as contrived and psychologically superficial and inept as anything I can remember from recent time. The breaking point is the film’s climatic sequence in which a contrivance so utterly laughable occurs that I was shocked that this was what the filmmakers felt was necessary to bring their leading character to his final comeuppance. It is the type of moment that makes you roll your eyes in its obvious and absurd execution as your head yells at the stupidity of the character, and the way in which it is resolved is perhaps even more absurd. It is endlessly frustrating, and speaks to the lack of trust and intelligence with which this film treats its characters and its audience.
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  #11  
Old 10-28-2012, 03:40 AM
Big ass interview with Zemeckis here http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwu7t...Muti02B5Ji38kQ
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  #12  
Old 11-04-2012, 05:08 PM

It seems like every week I keep adding a film to my top 10 of the year (so far) list. Zemeckis is back with another great adult drama after spending most of the decade making motion capture movies. After an incredible first 30 minutes or so, I wasn't sure if the rest would be able to stay at that level, but it does (although in a different way). It looks at addiction in an interesting way that, combined with the rest of the plot, ends up raising plenty of moral questions. When we get to the end, Denzel's character essentially has three possible choices to make, and the way that Zemeckis, Gatins and Washington deconstruct the character throughout the film left me very unsure as to the choice he would make. The scene where he has to make that decision had me on the edge of my seat as much as the crash at the beginning. There are a few false notes, such as the eventual reaction of the co-pilot (a scene that starts well, but ends in a disappointing way), but overall I was completely engrossed throughout and happy that I got to witness the kind of great, mid-budget, well-acted, R rated adult drama that doesn't really get made anymore.

Spoiler:
And that scene near the end where Denzel snorts the coke to bring himself up is one of the best of the year. The way it cuts from Denzel lying down in the bed asking for cocaine to Goodman strutting down the hall with a bag of coke was a really great moment.

Last edited by Bourne101; 11-05-2012 at 12:51 AM..
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  #13  
Old 11-05-2012, 12:47 AM
I'm with Bourne. It's imperfect, but incredibly engaging -- I cannot remember the last time any film of this length flew by this quickly for me (much less on with material fraught with the possibility of becoming boring or repetitive). Denzel owns it start to finish and while the film is indeed flawed, his performance isn't. I'm glad he seems to be shoo-in for all the big nominations (although he won't wing of course). A good reminder of what he's capable of.

I agree with Bourne's overall assessment and drawbacks. On minor quibble though...

Spoiler:
the opening nudity rubbed me the wrong way. It just felt exploitive, especially given the character's outcome. Some might argue that it adds to the hurt by showing her in a "pure" state so close to her death, but the "crack" joke kindof kills that possibility I feel. Seems like Bobby Z just wanted to see her nakey for a while.
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  #14  
Old 11-05-2012, 01:03 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by AceD View Post
I'm glad he seems to be shoo-in for all the big nominations (although he won't wing of course).[/SPOILER]
Intentional?
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  #15  
Old 11-05-2012, 02:16 AM
The scene where Melissa Leo questions Denzel's character solidified Denzel as a guarantee nomination for best actor. Such an incredible scene, and Denzel is amazing in it.


Spoiler:
I only wish we got more of the immediate after math of that questioning rather than the movie immediately cutting to him having been in prison for more than a year already.



Good movie, very compelling with great performances. Denzel isn't the only one who is great. Don Cheadle and Bruce Greenwood turn in strong work too. As does Kelly Reilly. But as much as I admired this movie, as strong as it is, I gotta say, I didn't quite love it. I wouldn't put it up there with some of Zemeckis' great work like Contact, Back to the Future, Who Framed Roger Rabbit?, Forrest Gump and Contact. Still liked it a lot though and am glad to see it doing well at the box office.

And yes, the crash scene is amazing too. Can't not mention it. Definitely an utterly gripping, fantastic moment. One for the ages.


Spoiler:
Another great scene is near the questioning scene where Denzel is at the hotel. After hearing some noises it takes him to the room next door. And you see all that alcohol. Oh, man what an intense moment. He'd been sober for over a week and now he has all this temptation in front of him. And for the longest time the camera just lingers at him staring. It's quite a while too. It's so unbelievably intense and suspenseful. Will he give in to temptation or not? You really don't want him to and then he does and you heart comes out of your chest! What a powerful moment!

Last edited by ilovemovies; 11-05-2012 at 02:19 AM..
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  #16  
Old 11-05-2012, 12:32 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovemovies View Post
Spoiler:
I only wish we got more of the immediate after math of that questioning rather than the movie immediately cutting to him having been in prison for more than a year already.
You and I disagree about the quality of The Grey, but what I liked about The Grey's ending (not counting the stupid epilogue) was

Spoiler:
the whole point was that he chose to fight; that he wanted to live. The movie ended then because the outcome wasn't the point. In a similar way, I almost wish Flight had ended with the reporters surrounding Denzel and the crowd in shock. Once he admitted it, isn't the point of the film complete? The epilogue just felt tonally like it was from a different film.
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  #17  
Old 11-05-2012, 02:29 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovemovies View Post
Spoiler:
Another great scene is near the questioning scene where Denzel is at the hotel. After hearing some noises it takes him to the room next door. And you see all that alcohol. Oh, man what an intense moment. He'd been sober for over a week and now he has all this temptation in front of him. And for the longest time the camera just lingers at him staring. It's quite a while too. It's so unbelievably intense and suspenseful. Will he give in to temptation or not? You really don't want him to and then he does and you heart comes out of your chest! What a powerful moment!
Spoiler:
Agreed. I can see how some would call that scene contrived, but I took it less literally and looked at it more as a symbol of the alcohol calling his name. Even with a Cee Lo () sized guard outside the room and a fridge of booze replaced with juice and soda, it still found its way to him.
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  #18  
Old 11-06-2012, 11:31 AM
There have been so many sinister characters from various films,that i couldnt wait to see get their
comeuppance,and then there are characters who are morally flawed and then some,but when
the character is coupled with the right actor i cant wait or hold out hope that he or she will
redeeem themselves before the final scene of the film.
In the film Flight the character William "Whip" Whitaker(Denzel Washington) is the latter.

The white knuckle opening of the film features a plane flown by Whip entering extreme turbulence and experiencing mechanical failure
thru the extreme maneuver of flying the plane upside down Whip and the crew are able to crash land
saving 96 of 102 people onboard.Of course after every crash there is an NTSB investigation,and when this
leads to the fact that Whip was intoxicated the film becomes an examination of an addict and the effects it has on
the people in the addicts life.


Director Robert Zemeckis shifts the gears of this film with great ease from an incredible action sequence to
a moving drama.There are so many standout brief touches that focuses on facing mortality,one standout scene taking place
on a hospital stairwell a scene easily stolen by James Badge Dale.
Then there's John Goodman as Harling Mays Whips dealer/friend/enabler .His scenes with Washington are both
mesmerizingly sad and darkly humorous.
Washington is outstanding as the arrogant addict Whip.He has supportive people around him ,a recovering heroin addict named
Nicole (Kelly Reillyt)that becomes his lover, friend and union rep Charlie Anderson (Bruce Greenwood),and his attorney
Hugh Lang (Don Cheadle) but it's Whip's way or the highway,and it is truely mesmerizing to watch Washington as Whip
try to outrun his addictions and slowly give in to them again.Even something as sobering as a plane crash
or someone he loves may prove to be no match to his addictions.
The fact that the audience let out several gasps at the actions of Whip,show how great of an actor Washington is.

It definitely looks like Washington will go head to head with Richard Gere who also portrayed a flawed but likeable character this year
for several best actor nominations

Scale of 1-10 a 9
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  #19  
Old 11-07-2012, 09:37 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by AceD View Post
Spoiler:
the opening nudity rubbed me the wrong way. It just felt exploitive, especially given the character's outcome. Some might argue that it adds to the hurt by showing her in a "pure" state so close to her death, but the "crack" joke kindof kills that possibility I feel. Seems like Bobby Z just wanted to see her nakey for a while.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovemovies View Post
Spoiler:
Another great scene is near the questioning scene where Denzel is at the hotel. After hearing some noises it takes him to the room next door. And you see all that alcohol. Oh, man what an intense moment. He'd been sober for over a week and now he has all this temptation in front of him. And for the longest time the camera just lingers at him staring. It's quite a while too. It's so unbelievably intense and suspenseful. Will he give in to temptation or not? You really don't want him to and then he does and you heart comes out of your chest! What a powerful moment!
Needless to say, this is a very well constructed and well acted film. With the pedigree of those that created it, that should come as no surprise. The movie is a deep plunge in to the world of addiction. The flight itself or relationship drama really has little to do with the movie itself. It’s a long and sometimes tedious look in to the actions of one deeply troubled and addicted man. The story does draw you in and makes you actually cringe at some of the choices Denzel’s character keeps making. That really is the sign of a good film maker/director. Zemeckis ushers the viewers through this emotional maze. He does so visually and emotionally in a superb fashion.

Both those spoilers above are examples of what I'm talking about. During the very first scene, he uses a stunning nude woman to actually guide your eye around the scene. To me, there was nothing exploitive about it. Just stunningly beautiful and captivating. It also adds depth to Denzel being close to her and feeling guilt. When you have 90 seconds to establish intimacy, what better way? Later, Zemeckis turns up the emotional attachment by guiding the viewer through a character tribulation at a key moment in the film.

Still, the movie did drag a bit for me but it’s more than worth a watch.

8/10

Last edited by JoeChar4321; 11-07-2012 at 09:40 PM..
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  #20  
Old 11-10-2012, 09:22 PM
Saw this a few days ago, fucking fantastically brilliant performance by Denzel. Very damned good movie too. Not one that I have any interest in seeing again, but good nonetheless!
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  #21  
Old 11-10-2012, 11:59 PM
while it is a fictionnal story ... it is heavily based on an actual event where Robert Piché safely landed an Airbus 330 in the Acores after every plane motor failed. Then it was spilled in the news that Piché served 16 months in jail for drug smuggling in 1983.
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  #22  
Old 11-18-2012, 11:57 PM
amazing film

this was an amazing film full of great performances and some really shocking and funny moments.Denzel once again gives a powerful performance and should get nominated for best actor and john goodman was damn hilarious in the small role he gave as denzel's drug dealer and friend.Come oscar time i hope it gets a best picture nomination cause it really deserves it and it happens to be one of the top 10 best movies i seen this year which i really wasn't expecting.It's a powerful and emotional and exceptional human drama and i can't wait to see it again on bluray so go see it if you haven't. 10/10
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  #23  
Old 01-29-2013, 06:02 PM
.

Last edited by SS-Block; 03-31-2014 at 05:27 PM..
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  #24  
Old 02-07-2013, 01:29 AM
I really enjoyed watching this movie. Denzel of course gave an amazing performance. I know its a long shot. But I am rooting for him to win best actor at the oscars. I haven't seen the other performances yet. So I am pretty much biased.

When I first seen John Goodman's character. I thought of Walter from The Big Lebowski. Did anyone else think that?
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  #25  
Old 02-08-2013, 12:10 PM
Loved this movie , and Denzel deserves the Oscar over DDL and JP.
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  #26  
Old 02-09-2013, 05:41 AM
Flight

First 5 minutes of the movie make the whole thing worth it, and if you've seen the flick you know what I'm talking about. Man, Nadine Velazquez is unbelievable...

The plane crash sequence is as tense as anything I've seen recently. It then becomes a different movie than you'd expect, but I definitely liked it.
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  #27  
Old 02-10-2013, 01:30 AM
Rented Flight tonight and it was a great, intense ride. Denzel was perfect, by the end I was just begging him to put down the bottle. The plane crash scene and then the scene of him in the hotel so intense and powerful.
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