#1  
Old 11-15-2012, 04:01 PM
Life of Pi




LIFE OF PI


Directed by Ang Lee

Written by David Magee, Based on the novel by Yann Martel

Starring Suraj Sharma, Irrfan Khan and Adil Hussain

Rated PG for emotional thematic content throughout, and some scary action sequences and peril

Running Time of 127 Minutes


A young man who survives a disaster at sea is hurtled into an epic journey of adventure and discovery. While cast away, he forms an unexpected connection with another survivor ... a fearsome Bengal tiger.


I have mixed feelings on the novel, but I'm generally a fan of Ang Lee's work. I'm skeptical, but early reviews are strong and it at least looks visually interesting. This is a likely Oscar contender as well.
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  #2  
Old 11-15-2012, 04:54 PM
I loved the book and I'm a fan of Lee so I'm certainly anticipating this one. Opening weekend for sure.
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  #3  
Old 11-22-2012, 01:13 PM
This looks excellent and my favourite reviewer (David Edelstein) gave it a rave review.

It also seems to be the movie that's finally convinced Ebert there may be some use for 3D yet:

"What astonishes me is how much I love the use of 3-D in "Life of Pi." I've never seen the medium better employed, not even in "Avatar," and although I continue to have doubts about it in general, Lee never uses it for surprises or sensations, but only to deepen the film's sense of places and events."

Don't know if I'll have time to see this this weekend but I definitely want to get to it next week.
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  #4  
Old 11-23-2012, 11:51 PM
Oftentimes sticking too closely to source material can be to the detriment of a film. Literature and cinema are drastically different mediums with distinct languages, and the device utilized in Yann Martel's Life of Pi is decidedly literary. As adapted by David Magee and directed by Ang Lee, the film utilizes said device as a sort of bookend framing structure for the film in which an older version of our main character tells his story to a writer. This sort of framing has been used many times before, and frankly I have seen it employed far more elegantly. The opening act of the film, filled with less detail and exposition than the novel, is a clunky mess. It is difficult to get a grasp on characters as we jump around too quickly and the editing feels rushed. Irrfan Khan (Adult Pi) is a wonderful actor, and his storytelling capabilities go a long way. Yet the film's opening fails to resonate, which lessens the impact later on. Pi's family is underdeveloped and portrayed by actors of varying quality, and thus a necessary emotional connection is never made.

In effect, Life of Pi is about faith and storytelling. It asks us to question our beliefs, our relationship with God, and the stories we tell and are told. The film is an allegory, a fact that is hit hard in the denouement. Many have issues with the ending of Martel's novel, and nothing is done to quell that here. I take less issue with the tactic as a whole, however its delivery in the film is quite on the nose. Once again we are left in the capable hands of Irrfan Khan to make questionable material work. David Magee's screenplay is filled with rote dialogue and platitudes. Thusly, I'm not quite sure if the allegory succeeds. One's own beliefs and faith will likely inform the way they receive the film, however I don't think it achieves the grand impact that it intends to.

My relationship with religion is complicated. Being Jewish is important to me, and is a big part of my cultural identity and my connection with my family. Yet at the same time I choose to separate Judaism into tradition and spirituality. I think both of those things form to create religion as we recognize it (not organized religion, necessarily) and each plays an important part in one's relationship with God. As such, I have always favored the tradition. I love how religion can bring my family together, how we celebrate holidays or have Friday night dinner. It connects us and makes us part of a whole. I am more conflicted as far as spirituality is concerned. I have no concrete ideas or beliefs. Pi grapples with religion throughout the runtime of the film. As a young boy we see him sampling and learning a variety of approaches to being one with God. (Or Gods). As an older man he has settled on a blend of religions that suits his needs. And on his journey in the center of the film he is constantly tested and in turn questions his faith. This through-line carries throughout the film and becomes a major talking point in the finale. It made me ponder and question my own beliefs and my own journey, and thus relate it back to Pi. We are told that Pi's story has the potential to "make you believe in God," but perhaps instead the film makes us question the validity and importance of religion to begin with. This is complex and resonant material that unfortunately read to me as pablum in the context of the film. Perhaps this is purely a reaction based on my own beliefs, but even if so that merely speaks to the inevitable subjectivity of film criticism.

On the other hand, the film's middle section is simply stunning. This is the meat of the film, and Ang Lee proves once again that he is a master craftsman. The imagery is spectacular; a wonderful blend of well executed CGI, lighting, and water. Director of Photography Claudio Miranda has composed beautiful shots that blend the real and the generated seamlessly. This is an extremely attractive film and it makes the middle section quite the ride. As a story of survival, it's quite effective. There's a strong balance of harrowing emotional turmoil and sly humor, and Suraj Sharma, in his first film role, is excellent. For much of the film he is the only human on screen, and he makes a strong connection. He's surprisingly humorous and sarcastic yet also looks within to find the truth of a young man attempting to survive a terrible journey. His face is maleable and filthy, and he speaks volumes with his eyes. Suraj's co-star, as it were, is the tiger Richard Parker. Rendered almost entirely with computer imagery, Richard is a phenomenal creation of technology. The fur, the eyes, the whiskers - Richard feels and looks real, and displays a full range of emotions. Although the relationship between Pi and Richard plays out in a "safer" fashion than in the novel, it is the one element of the film that truly hit home on an emotional level. That this was accomplished with a CG tiger is a credit to director Lee and his craftsman.

It remains, though, that the film never quite finds its way. The 3D is some of the best yet in a live action film, and as an adventure and exciting holiday blockbuster it works quite well. When we look at the bigger picture, though, I left feeling somewhat empty. It is not so much that the story betrays the audience but rather that it is presented in a fairly conventional fashion. This novel was frequently labeled as unfilmable, and I certainly have respect for Ang Lee for what he has accomplished here. On a technical level, Life of Pi is a marvel. But it ultimately didn't succeed for me as allegory or as emotional substance, and I can't help but feel that's what truly matters.

Last edited by SpikeDurden; 11-27-2012 at 10:47 AM..
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  #5  
Old 11-24-2012, 07:30 PM
Loved the book, loved the film. I had always been curious what Life of Pi would have looked like had it been directed by the other filmmakers attached to it when it was going through development hell. Maybe Jean-Pierre Jeunet would have emphasized the more quirky and fantastical elements of the book and Cuaron may have gone for a grittier approach. But none of that matters, because Ang Lee's vision has proven to be a perfect marriage between the source material and an auteur's sensibilities. On paper the story seems to be a perfect fit for Lee - a tale that deals with a boy's relationship with nature and his own spirituality as he struggles to survive in the middle of the ocean (with a tiger no less), and as a director he understands the importance of those themes and treats them with the respect and emphasis that they deserve for the story. But furthermore, Lee also manages to broaden his range and achieve what is possibly the biggest visual and technical marvel I have seen all year. Dozens of shots are flat-out amazing and others are starling and more contemplative and haunting...either way, nearly every second had me thinking "how did they do that?!"

All in all, the film certainly resonated with me in the same way the book did, and with that said, I found this to be one of the most entertaining and poignant film experiences of the year.

Oh, and Suraj Sharma carries the film beautifully and it's hard to believe that a kid with absolutely no acting experience whatsoever was able to pull off such an emotional performance, let alone the fact that he was by himself and in front of a blue screen for 90% of the time. Definitely my vote for breakthrough of the year.
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  #6  
Old 11-25-2012, 04:39 PM
Pretty much loved it. The most moving film of the year, hands down. It's just such a great story and even though it is a difficult one to tell, Ang Lee handles it very well and continues to show why he's one of the best and most diverse directors working today. From the first act character development, to the sinking of the ship, to Pi and Richard Parker's harrowing story of survival... I was engrossed the entire way. I did have a few problems with the final act though. It's not so much the direction it took, but the way it was delivered. I just think that the film moved me so deeply up until that unbroken shot where Pi explains the alternative story that it was tough for me to be moved even more during that scene. Suraj Sharma is great in the scene, but something just felt slightly off about it. Still, it wasn't a deal breaker and is something I think might play better on a re-watch.

Visually, I was a bit worried going in. Some of the shots in the trailer looked very "Lovely Bones heaven" esque, but those were really the only shots in the movie that looked that way. Everything else looked absolutely incredible. The animal CGI was also outstanding. So often these $200 million movies contain CGI that attempts to create something that looks real and fails miserably. That was not an issue here. Richard Parker looks fuckin' legit.

Last edited by Bourne101; 11-25-2012 at 04:41 PM..
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  #7  
Old 11-25-2012, 04:54 PM
Bourne and I are just disagreeing on everything this year.
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  #8  
Old 11-25-2012, 04:56 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDurden View Post
Bourne and I are just disagreeing on everything this year.
The time is coming! Killing Them Softly, The Hobbit, Django Unchained, Les Miserables, Zero Dark Thirty... we will (hopefully) agree on a few of these! We did agree on Skyfall and Argo, but yeah, we've pretty much been on opposites sides for everything (Flight, Lincoln, Silver Linings, etc.)

Last edited by Bourne101; 11-25-2012 at 05:00 PM..
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  #9  
Old 11-25-2012, 05:24 PM
Pretty sure you two both loved Cloud Atlas, too
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  #10  
Old 11-25-2012, 05:32 PM
I like pi.
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  #11  
Old 11-25-2012, 06:57 PM
Eh...it was a gorgeous film, no doubt. Lee still has a master filmmaker in him obviously, but other than the awe and spectacle of it all visually- i just did not get into this AT ALL. Like half the theatre audibly loved it throughout though so what do I know.
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  #12  
Old 11-26-2012, 02:52 AM
I have heard good reviews of this movie. I am going to watch it tonight.
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  #13  
Old 12-03-2012, 01:37 AM

Wow! I went in this movie with low expectations because the trailers and commercials failed to grab me. Sure the movie looked neat visually, but otherwise, I just couldn't muster any excitement for the movie. Well now that I've seen it I can say: this movie blew me away! There are some scenes that are truly stunning. Some scenes that just take your breath away. Some scenes that are so beautiful, so majestic, so moving and haunting and some scenes that just damn near moved me to tears. And I'm not even a very religious person. I've always considered myself to be agnostic. The truth is, I don't care for religion. I don't think about it. It rarely ever, if ever, occupies my time in my head. Is there are a god? I just don't care. All I care about is the here and now. But this movie actually made me caught up on this journey the lead character goes to. A journey that is equally spiritual as it is physical.

The lead performance from Suraj Sharma is absolutely incredible. This is a performance so amazing that it actually rivals Daniel Day Lewis's work in Lincoln and Liam Neeson's work in The Grey as among the very best of the year. It will be an absolute crime if he doesn't get an Academy Award nomination, even though his chances appear to be iffy right now. Irrfan Khan, who plays the lead character as an adult, is wonderful as well, but it is Sharma who truly carries the movie on his little shoulders.

Then there is the ending. The ending appears to have been met with mixed reaction but I personally loved it. Admittedly, I wasn't really sure at first what to think, but what I loved about it is that it makes you think back at the movie and look at it differently. It made me want to see the movie again just view it from that point of view.

It's too soon to call this the movie of the year. There are still one month left and plenty that I need to see that look like they have a lot of potential. But, as of right now, I can say with 100% certainty that it is currently my favorite movie of the year. I have never seen anything like this and probably never will. Ang Lee has made some very fine films in the past, but this is, without a doubt, his best one yet. The movie also contains the best use of 3D I have ever seen, even surpassing Avatar. In fact, it's a testament to how enraptured I was at the movie that there were a few times where I even forgot I was wearing those damn glasses. That NEVER happens. Not even with Avatar. But Life of Pi is a different beast altogether. And I can't wait to see the movie again.

9/10
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  #14  
Old 12-03-2012, 01:45 AM
I'm gonna see this film this week and in 3D with all the raves its getting in 3D. The life of pie is never long if I'm around. Mmmm pie.
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  #15  
Old 12-03-2012, 08:45 AM
Stunning visuals coupled with the story of a young man named Pi (Suraj Sharma) who
becomes lost at sea with a a Bengal tiger named Richard Parker (after a clerical error)
pulled me into the film,but its strong look at faith,religion,the dark side of human nature,
and triumph of the human spirit made me reflect on my own views of religion and faith.

The story is lacking in certain turns,but still manages to charm throughout and features
some of the boldest 3D effects and SFX i have ever seen on the big screen.

Scale of 1-10 an 8½
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  #16  
Old 12-03-2012, 08:47 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovemovies View Post
Wow! I went in this movie with low expectations because the trailers and commercials failed to grab me. Sure the movie looked neat visually, but otherwise, I just couldn't muster any excitement for the movie. Well now that I've seen it I can say: this movie blew me away! There are some scenes that are truly stunning. Some scenes that just take your breath away. Some scenes that are so beautiful, so majestic, so moving and haunting and some scenes that just damn near moved me to tears. And I'm not even a very religious person. I've always considered myself to be agnostic. The truth is, I don't care for religion. I don't think about it. It rarely ever, if ever, occupies my time in my head. Is there are a god? I just don't care. All I care about is the here and now. But this movie actually made me caught up on this journey the lead character goes to. A journey that is equally spiritual as it is physical.

The lead performance from Suraj Sharma is absolutely incredible. This is a performance so amazing that it actually rivals Daniel Day Lewis's work in Lincoln and Liam Neeson's work in The Grey as among the very best of the year. It will be an absolute crime if he doesn't get an Academy Award nomination, even though his chances appear to be iffy right now. Irrfan Khan, who plays the lead character as an adult, is wonderful as well, but it is Sharma who truly carries the movie on his little shoulders.

Then there is the ending. The ending appears to have been met with mixed reaction but I personally loved it. Admittedly, I wasn't really sure at first what to think, but what I loved about it is that it makes you think back at the movie and look at it differently. It made me want to see the movie again just view it from that point of view.

It's too soon to call this the movie of the year. There are still one month left and plenty that I need to see that look like they have a lot of potential. But, as of right now, I can say with 100% certainty that it is currently my favorite movie of the year. I have never seen anything like this and probably never will. Ang Lee has made some very fine films in the past, but this is, without a doubt, his best one yet. The movie also contains the best use of 3D I have ever seen, even surpassing Avatar. In fact, it's a testament to how enraptured I was at the movie that there were a few times where I even forgot I was wearing those damn glasses. That NEVER happens. Not even with Avatar. But Life of Pi is a different beast altogether. And I can't wait to see the movie again.

9/10
Excellent review and wrap up of my sentiments. Glad to see you enjoyed it.
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  #17  
Old 12-03-2012, 10:38 PM
Amazing visuals and one of the best films of the year. If I had to guess what nominations (at the least) they would be
Picture
Director
Screenplay
Cinematography
Visual effects
Art Direction
Original Score
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  #18  
Old 12-03-2012, 11:25 PM
Saw it at the NYFF last month - absolutely stunning, beautiful story. One of the best films of the year.

Review - http://afterthecut.com/2012/09/28/review-life-of-pi/

Here's video of Ang Lee and the cast talking about the film at the NYFF that I shot - http://afterthecut.com/2012/09/28/wa...in-life-of-pi/
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  #19  
Old 12-03-2012, 11:54 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by creekin111 View Post
Amazing visuals and one of the best films of the year. If I had to guess what nominations (at the least) they would be
Picture
Director
Screenplay
Cinematography
Visual effects
Art Direction
Original Score
I personally think it deserves a best actor nod, besides all of the ones you mentioned. Unfortunately, it's chances of that is small probably.
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  #20  
Old 12-04-2012, 12:44 AM
HA! I knew you'd like it

Life of Pi is awesome.
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  #21  
Old 12-04-2012, 12:49 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMovieMan View Post
HA! I knew you'd like it
When i saw ilovemovies' rating of the film, I rememberd what you and Bourne said to him, its cool that we learn each other's movie tastes on the board.
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  #22  
Old 12-04-2012, 02:08 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMovieMan View Post
HA! I knew you'd like it

Life of Pi is awesome.
Ha! What can I say, you and Bourne were right.

And the marketing department for this movie sucked at their jobs.
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  #23  
Old 12-04-2012, 01:12 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hucksta G View Post
When i saw ilovemovies' rating of the film, I rememberd what you and Bourne said to him, its cool that we learn each other's movie tastes on the board.
Ye, pretty nifty
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  #24  
Old 12-08-2012, 08:06 AM
Ii have seen previews of this film and it looks good but it is not due to hit Aussie theatres until Jan so l will have to wait
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  #25  
Old 12-22-2012, 10:17 AM
The idea of 3D films should all be about “context”. Does the quality enhance the film, or is simply a gimmick that doesn’t provide anything other than a more expensive movie ticket? For Ang Lee’s Life of Pi, the use of 3D in his film is certainly on the former. Pi is an exquisitely beautiful film that gives the settings a more earthly feel, but nothing that diminishes the overall context and thematic moments of the film as a whole. This film is more than a “boy has a tiger on the boat and has to survive” that the trailers have been promoting in the commercials, nor is it this year’s Avatar that some critics have proclaimed. What Ang lee has created is a deep, emotional resonant film that, while it holds the audience at arms length in certain portions of the story, still manages to be utterly engaging and solid film.

The foremost theme that Ang Lee and the screenwriters try to bring across to the viewer is the concept of faith, and the bearing it has on a young youth over the years. That young youth in the film is Pi (Suraj Sharma), a young boy who begins to follow different religions as he becomes exposed to each one throughout his years. This is the most interesting aspect to the film, as it never converts the viewer to believe in a certain religious belief. Lee wants the viewer to see the fragility and interest in young youths who become expose to something new, overwhelming, and mysterious. Lee also shows how that open-minded belief becomes deluded over the years, as Pi grows up and becomes less enthused with religious beliefs and more inclined to the basic interest of teenagers.

But, by the second half of the film rolls around, Lee brings the momentum forward when Pi becomes involved in a shipwreck and has to survive on a lifeboat with a wild Bengal tiger, a stowaway that Pi’s father (Adil Hussain), a zoo keeper, owned and was bringing to Canada. There is that fear that Lee won’t be ale to keep the interest of the viewer of Pi and a tiger on a lifeboat, but he definitely makes it work with some pretty tense scenes where Pi has to devise a plan to keep the tiger at bay, while also learning to survive on his own. Granted, there is a bit of a slog by the time the film comes to an end, but the visuals are so grand and astounding with the use of 3D that while one scene feel dawdling, the visuals still keep the viewer interested.

But, if there’s one thing that seems a bit confusing and moved to the side, it’s the idea of faith in the final moments of the film. Lee beings an unexpected layer to the story with this one unbroken take involving Sharma as the teenage Pi, and while it’s a powerful scene that brings more depth to the film, the scene also feels shoehorned in, especially with the thematic ideas of faith that are on display. This was an adaptation of a book by Yann Martel so I’m not sure how those final moments are portrayed in the book, but it feels a bit disjointed from the film as a whole.

Other than those slight missteps, the direction and actors on display are all fantastic. Newcomer Suraj Sharma is excellent as Pi, never giving the feeling that this is a young actor too big for his britches. He shows the anger, frustration, and hopelessness out at sea without breaking or sweat or coming across as amateur. This is more to be said as he’s essentially playing against a CGI Bengal tiger, who looks utterly amazing when seen in 3D.

That’s the second excellent aspect of the film, the visuals. While on a small screen at home, the film feels too CGIed, the 3D in the theater makes those visuals are a part of the world, rather than Sharma simply being in a visual landscape that feels separate to the actor. Lee is able to blend the visuals with having Sharma interact with his computer-generated surroundings, so the stakes feel more real and authentic. The scenes with him on the lifeboat in the beginning and, particularly a scene where Pi needs to escape a sinking freighter is where Lee truly nails the practicality of involving his actors with the computer-generated environment.

Overall, Life of Pi is a great film that continues to show the versatility of director Ang Lee and the projects he approaches, as well as being a warm, visually beautiful film on the concept of faith and how it is put to the test when the situation becomes dire and beyond hopeless. It also shows how 3D can be used to maximum effect, and not just something shoehorned in many blockbusters.

8.5/10
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  #26  
Old 12-24-2012, 07:06 AM
this movie is slow story and it's disappoint me
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  #27  
Old 01-19-2013, 03:32 AM
I saw LIFE OF PI three times in one week.
The third time, I saw it in 3d.

First time I have EVER thought a movie was a "better experience" with 3d added. Some movies look great in 3d (AVENGERS, UP, THE FINAL DESTINATION (2009), HAROLD & KUMAR CHRISTMAS), but if it is in 2d I still consider the experience just as rewarding - or shitty.

LIFE OF PI, on the other hand... this is a moving picture, pun intended, and I was only further moved and engrossed by the dazzling spectacle of the wonderful 3d.

It's the first time I want to buy the blu ray in 3d, day one. Worth thirty bucks, IMO.

For now, it's my favorite movie of 2012, but there are still a handful I haven't seen yet which might change my mind.
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  #28  
Old 03-20-2013, 12:09 AM
Just watched this flick in the comfort of my home!

I gotta say, when i first heard of the movie, I had really no interest, then the trailers came out and I still had no interest, because it looked kind of boring, and even though I think Ang Lee is a great director, his movies can tend to be a bit boring, and with this story and Ang Lee, I just thought this would be insanely boring.

Boy was I wrong.. by far Ang Lee's best movie and a VERY well deserved Best Director win for him at this years Oscars.

The story was amazing, the acting was all top notch, there was a few humor beats that gave me a good chuckle

and as I have a 3D set up in my home, I was able to watch this movie as it was intended and my god, that is up there with some of the best if not THE best 3D I have ever seen.

I also loved the shifting Aspect Ratios in a few scenes, just a genius move by a genius director.

Spoiler:
And I absolutely loved the ending, with that twist where the story was really about his mother, the cook and the sailor


one of the biggest surprises I have had... seeing as I really had no interest in this movie, but wanting to utilize my 3D TV a bit more made the purchase of this title and just wow, tremendous!
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  #29  
Old 03-20-2013, 01:21 AM
I enjoyed this film quite a bit more on Blu-ray. It really is stunning.
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  #30  
Old 03-20-2013, 01:24 AM
Just like cotton candy, pretty to look at but not fulfilling whatsoever.

The visuals were truly stunning except when Lee got silly and added all the glow in the dark neon. Why he did that I will never understand. Had he just stuck with the more grounded and natural shots the film would have been far more impressive IMO. Do you really need to add neon colors to a scene on the ocean? Seriously, the ocean is awe inspiring enough without making it glow. It seemed fake and forced to me.

As far as the story is concerned, some of the stuff on the life raft between the boy and tiger and how they survived on the ocean was good. But it seemed laborious and preachy from about half way on. Honestly I was bored and somewhat insulted by the films end.

Only film I have really liked by Lee so far was Ice Storm. In fact, I really liked that. But it doesn't look like he is interested in taking on difficult, adult subject matter anymore. He seems to prefer fairy tales now.

Last edited by rustysyringe; 03-20-2013 at 01:27 AM..
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  #31  
Old 05-05-2013, 09:48 AM
Just saw this last night. It kinda reminds me of The English Patient. I enjoyed it, but not sure it will stand up over time. There seemed to be something missing that rounded the whole thing together.

7/10

Last edited by Erroneous; 05-05-2013 at 09:52 AM..
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  #32  
Old 05-11-2013, 04:33 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by rustysyringe View Post
Just like cotton candy, pretty to look at but not fulfilling whatsoever.

The visuals were truly stunning except when Lee got silly and added all the glow in the dark neon. Why he did that I will never understand. Had he just stuck with the more grounded and natural shots the film would have been far more impressive IMO. Do you really need to add neon colors to a scene on the ocean? Seriously, the ocean is awe inspiring enough without making it glow. It seemed fake and forced to me.
Wasn't the glowing stuff in the water supposed to be bioluminescent plankton? Glowing plankton is a real thing, not sure where you can find it, but it's out there.
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  #33  
Old 05-11-2013, 05:12 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by psycheoutsteve View Post
Wasn't the glowing stuff in the water supposed to be bioluminescent plankton? Glowing plankton is a real thing, not sure where you can find it, but it's out there.
Absolutely its called bioluminescence and its not just in oceans either. You can even grow bioluminescence algae at home
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  #34  
Old 05-11-2013, 05:57 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Erroneous View Post
Just saw this last night. It kinda reminds me of The English Patient. I enjoyed it, but not sure it will stand up over time. There seemed to be something missing that rounded the whole thing together.

7/10
The English Patient? How so? Maybe you should to rewatch it again in the near future to find out what was missing?
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  #35  
Old 05-12-2013, 04:12 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by creekin111 View Post
Absolutely its called bioluminescence and its not just in oceans either. You can even grow bioluminescence algae at home
Gotta get me some of that! There's some amazing stuff on this planet.
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  #36  
Old 05-12-2013, 06:08 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by psycheoutsteve View Post
Gotta get me some of that! There's some amazing stuff on this planet.
3 ways to Grow Bioluminescent Algae at Home

http://www.wikihow.com/Grow-Biolumin...-Algae-at-Home
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  #37  
Old 05-21-2013, 03:36 AM
I find this movie so boring.
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  #38  
Old 05-21-2013, 04:33 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by appealzero View Post
I find this movie so boring.
Would you say your appeal is... zero?
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  #39  
Old 05-24-2013, 03:34 AM
http://phubb.blogspot.co.uk/2013/04/...f-pi-2012.html

My review...with pics!
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