#921  
Old 12-08-2012, 12:22 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by xseanymacx View Post
Excellent observation. Wouldn't Wayne Manor have been Bane's first target for a takeover/destruction? Especially with knowing Bruce is having to watch the news from the pit.
Just simply another instance of the slapdash effort that is TDKR. Rushed, over plotted, too many characters(albeit paper mache characters), an absolutely ridiculous story and no sense of kinetic energy that the other two films posessed. I said it before and will say it again, there is approximately 4 minutes of actual energy and tension in the film. When Bane traps Bats in the sewers and they have an EPIC throw down.

Then Bats is taken to the prison and its back to a blindly meandering plot stumbling to the finish line still chugging its whiskey bottle. The 40 min finale also is lame as hell. Where was the thematic depth? There is none, no depth to this movie whatsoever which is why I was just flabbergasted Nolan went the route he did....he made an actual blockbuster. Not a film like BB or TDK. You think those films are categorized as blockbusters? Theyre films that are NOT mainstreamed to a wide audience, TDKR is nothing but that.....a popcorn piece.
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  #922  
Old 12-08-2012, 12:41 PM
I would agree that TDKR is striving for that depth, but doesn't quite attain it. It wasn't as thematically coherent as BB or TDK for me, but it still had some interesting subtextual moments.

Both BB and TDK were comic book pieces too, in my opinion, not any less so than TDKR. I would say The Dark Knight is the strongest of the trilogy for its relentless momentum, insane villain, complex themes and how satisfyingly it all came together. Rises falls short of these things (although, I thought Bane was a great follow-up to Joker). I still really enjoyed it though, and was still able to appreciate so much of Nolan's craft.
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  #923  
Old 12-08-2012, 12:59 PM
Like I said all along, having Batman come-back/un-retire TWICE in the same movie clogged it up. A great movie would have been for Batman to be broken early, then watch as hes totally crippled financially. He's beaten. He could slink away into that prison and have peace. But he doesnt, he rises, he gets his back fixed, he gets outta the prison, THEN HE HAS TO TRAIN, to re-discover Batman, put himself through hell again and find that edge again.

All the while, Gotham is basically a disaster-movie. Cut off from the world, ruled by a dictator. I've never seen a comic book movie like that, and it was awesome, but it wasn't explored enough.

The whole "retired" subplot was redundant. Worse though, is all the important bits could have been incorporated into the "broken bat" plotline. And it wouldnt have made Batman quit, which is something he would never, ever do, no matter how sad he was. Boo hoo, your girlfriend died and you... retired? The only other great tragedy in your life was when your parents were killed and you USED THAT PAIN to become Batman. But your girlfriend dies and you do the opposite? What?

Also, he could have just used those stun darts on Bane that he used on all the guards. Just sayin'.
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  #924  
Old 12-08-2012, 02:25 PM
I saw this again last night and it was just as exciting the second time around. It's really refreshing to watch a movie like this and think to yourself how neat that it isn't in 3D. I don't think 3D would of added anything to this movie and it actually might of ruined it. nice to see there are exciting movies to watch that are not in 3D. so I really don't buy that blockbuster argument. he made a great film about a comic book hero. that may be why it's a blockbuster. the only problem I see is that this was Nolan's last Batman film. I don't know about you, but I feel a bit disappointed by that.

I think you really have to look at the 3 films as a trilogy and then you can see the remarkable job Nolan and his team did in finishing up their story.

this movie has set a new standard for comic book movies. until Batman begins was released we were never asked to look at a superhero the way Nolan presents him.



9.5/10
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  #925  
Old 12-08-2012, 04:11 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by adamjohnson View Post
Like I said all along, having Batman come-back/un-retire TWICE in the same movie clogged it up. A great movie would have been for Batman to be broken early, then watch as hes totally crippled financially. He's beaten. He could slink away into that prison and have peace. But he doesnt, he rises, he gets his back fixed, he gets outta the prison, THEN HE HAS TO TRAIN, to re-discover Batman, put himself through hell again and find that edge again.

All the while, Gotham is basically a disaster-movie. Cut off from the world, ruled by a dictator. I've never seen a comic book movie like that, and it was awesome, but it wasn't explored enough.

The whole "retired" subplot was redundant. Worse though, is all the important bits could have been incorporated into the "broken bat" plotline. And it wouldnt have made Batman quit, which is something he would never, ever do, no matter how sad he was. Boo hoo, your girlfriend died and you... retired? The only other great tragedy in your life was when your parents were killed and you USED THAT PAIN to become Batman. But your girlfriend dies and you do the opposite? What?

Also, he could have just used those stun darts on Bane that he used on all the guards. Just sayin'.

The biggest misconception about this movie is that he quit because Rachel died. No, he quit because he had to at the end of TDK and Batman wasn't needed anymore. Rachels death was the main reason for Bruce Waynes reclusive behavior. Not Batmans.

Last edited by poopontheshoes7; 12-08-2012 at 04:56 PM..
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  #926  
Old 12-08-2012, 04:38 PM
Crazy that people are misinterpreting this film to such high degrees and still looking for explanations for everything that happens.
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  #927  
Old 12-08-2012, 06:25 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by adamjohnson View Post
The whole "retired" subplot was redundant. Worse though, is all the important bits could have been incorporated into the "broken bat" plotline. And it wouldnt have made Batman quit, which is something he would never, ever do, no matter how sad he was. Boo hoo, your girlfriend died and you... retired? The only other great tragedy in your life was when your parents were killed and you USED THAT PAIN to become Batman. But your girlfriend dies and you do the opposite? What?
He didn't retire because Rachel died, he retired because he put an end to organized crime and there was no need for Batman anymore. Early in the movie Alfred says that Bruce is just waiting around for another threat to Gotham so he can return as Batman.

As for Bruce's return to Gotham, it's just a jump cut. I think several things should have been fleshed out in this movie, but that is not one of them.
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  #928  
Old 12-08-2012, 07:49 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMovieMan View Post
Crazy that people are misinterpreting this film to such high degrees and still looking for explanations for everything that happens.

What's crazy is that you're dissing a discussion for the sake of just randomly shooting down criticisms that organically arise as part of that discussion. I don't think the condescending attitude is really warranted. It's pretty cool, and perhaps a better acclaim for this film, that so many months after the movie came out, a video release gets people so eager to continue discussing it.

But yeah, I do agree with, as others pointed out, I don't get where it comes from -- the idea that Batman retired because of Rachel. It was very explicitly stated in the end of TDK and touched on throughout the trilogy from the beginning that Batman main goal was in trying to bring hope to Gotham and then retouched on at the start or Rises that Dent's death was what he saw as hope. That's part of the reason I felt the conclusion of the trilogy scored so well. Wayne starting a family again was another thematic thread and it was there that Rachel's death played the part.
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  #929  
Old 12-09-2012, 11:06 AM
That may be a better explanation. However, why did he let his body go to pot? Why did he mope around with a cane? He bore all the hallmarks of grade-a depression, most likely from a combination of the two.

However, that doesnt change the fact that I felt it goes against his character. (And/or the character of Batman)
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  #930  
Old 12-09-2012, 11:12 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by adamjohnson View Post
That may be a better explanation. However, why did he let his body go to pot? Why did he mope around with a cane? He bore all the hallmarks of grade-a depression, most likely from a combination of the two.

However, that doesnt change the fact that I felt it goes against his character. (And/or the character of Batman)
As some would argue, this is Nolan's Bruce/Batman; meaning, he is not confined to the traits and characteristics of the comic book tales. It's also a similar argument made about Alfred leaving Bruce in the film which completely goes against his comic book counterpart as well as his stance in both BB and TDK. I understood his seclusive attitude, as well as his look in TDKR, it was basically an embodiment of his guilt, failure, and the mental toll he took for the lost of Rachel and Harvey. The part that still baffles me is the magical knee brace
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  #931  
Old 12-09-2012, 11:33 AM
Regarding the knee brace:

http://www.scientificamerican.com/ar...an-exoskeleton

I don't have time to find a more current article but that one is from 2008. Recently I'd seen this technology pop up again in a suit intended for firemen, though I imagine the military will drive the cost up too high. I just can't wait until they have one that can save me asking people to help me move. The suit isn't as streamlined and simplistic as what Wayne was using but...

Last edited by The Postmaster General; 12-09-2012 at 11:36 AM..
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  #932  
Old 12-09-2012, 11:45 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postmaster General View Post
Regarding the knee brace:

http://www.scientificamerican.com/ar...an-exoskeleton

I don't have time to find a more current article but that one is from 2008. Recently I'd seen this technology pop up again in a suit intended for firemen, though I imagine the military will drive the cost up too high. I just can't wait until they have one that can save me asking people to help me move. The suit isn't as streamlined and simplistic as what Wayne was using but...
Yet his leg was fine when he got to the prison.
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  #933  
Old 12-09-2012, 11:50 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jig Saw 123 View Post
The part that still baffles me is the magical knee brace
This made me laugh

"Fuck you, brick pillar!"
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  #934  
Old 12-09-2012, 12:37 PM
If you isolate an early dialogue exchange it sounds like its from a porno.

-If i pull that off, would you die?
-It would be very painful...
-You're a big guy.
-...for you.
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  #935  
Old 12-09-2012, 01:31 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postmaster General View Post
Regarding the knee brace:

http://www.scientificamerican.com/ar...an-exoskeleton

I don't have time to find a more current article but that one is from 2008. Recently I'd seen this technology pop up again in a suit intended for firemen, though I imagine the military will drive the cost up too high. I just can't wait until they have one that can save me asking people to help me move. The suit isn't as streamlined and simplistic as what Wayne was using but...
If side effects include healing the very limb the device occupies then by all means, put this into mass production.

I just think we could have done without Bruce kicking the brick wall.
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  #936  
Old 12-09-2012, 06:46 PM
adam, Jig…

I was just sharing something I thought was relatively cool and pertained to the discussion, not trying to argue that stuff that happens in Batman movies is 100% true to life. The leg brace was brought up as if it were some kind of magical and impossible technology, so I responded accordingly. Bruce's rate of healing is another thing all together but I was under the impression that he had been wearing the leg brace throughout since we never saw him in speedos after that scene.

You guys are picking arguments where there are none. That lady carrying groceries: now I know how she felt in her final moments after walking in on the Burly Brawl.
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  #937  
Old 12-09-2012, 07:13 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jig Saw 123 View Post

I just think we could have done without Bruce kicking the brick wall.
Why? The film's realistic, yeah - but it's heightened realism.
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  #938  
Old 12-09-2012, 10:08 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postmaster General View Post
adam, Jig…

I was just sharing something I thought was relatively cool and pertained to the discussion, not trying to argue that stuff that happens in Batman movies is 100% true to life. The leg brace was brought up as if it were some kind of magical and impossible technology, so I responded accordingly. Bruce's rate of healing is another thing all together but I was under the impression that he had been wearing the leg brace throughout since we never saw him in speedos after that scene.

You guys are picking arguments where there are none. That lady carrying groceries: now I know how she felt in her final moments after walking in on the Burly Brawl.
I'm sorry if my wording sounds like its coming off as argumentative, I really meant nothing by it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Digifruitella View Post
Why? The film's realistic, yeah - but it's heightened realism.
I just think, I don't know, someone putting on a robotic knee brace that gives them the ability to kick a brick wall with their barefoot is just too much for what we've seen Bruce do previously. Then again, it could have been the shoes
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  #939  
Old 12-09-2012, 10:17 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jig Saw 123 View Post
I just think, I don't know, someone putting on a robotic knee brace that gives them the ability to kick a brick wall with their barefoot is just too much for what we've seen Bruce do previously.
Simply solved...he's Batman.
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  #940  
Old 12-09-2012, 10:55 PM
I keep going back and fourth between this and Life of Pi as to which one is my favorite movie of the year so far. I think the movie only gets better with re-watches. I use to think the movie had pacing issues, but not anymore. I think the pacing is just about perfect. The movie begins slowly but that's fine. I don't take issue with that. Furthermore, more than any other movie I have seen recently, it truly builds momentum as it goes along until it reaches it's crescendo during the movie's truly awesome climax and the last 10 minutes of the movie are among the most satisfying as any conclusion that I have ever seen.

I just love this movie. It's going to be one of those movies where I will watch over and over and never get tired of. It's a masterpiece and I actually love it now more than The Dark Knight, which I use to think was the best movie in the trilogy. And Christopher Nolan's Dark Knight trilogy is now my second favorite trilogy of all time, second only to The Lord of the Rings.
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  #941  
Old 12-10-2012, 02:54 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jig Saw 123 View Post
I just think, I don't know, someone putting on a robotic knee brace that gives them the ability to kick a brick wall with their barefoot is just too much for what we've seen Bruce do previously. Then again, it could have been the shoes
An important detail, that I never see discussed about this film, is that it's set in the future. The Dark Knight was set in 2008, and in TDKR they state that 8 years have passed since Dent's death, which means the movie takes place in 2016. I think that's a significant reason why the film has a bit more of a sci-fi vibe to it with the leg brace and The Bat being gadgets that aren't really possible today, but are far from the realm of plausibility within the next several years.
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  #942  
Old 12-10-2012, 10:54 AM
I think the movie (and the script) were rushed.

I bet he spent so much time and focus on Inception, that they just didnt get to Dark Knight Rises early enough. These blockbusters have a release date before they have a script usually. It just needed more time to work out the issues.
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  #943  
Old 12-10-2012, 12:06 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveyJoeG View Post
An important detail, that I never see discussed about this film, is that it's set in the future. The Dark Knight was set in 2008, and in TDKR they state that 8 years have passed since Dent's death, which means the movie takes place in 2016. I think that's a significant reason why the film has a bit more of a sci-fi vibe to it with the leg brace and The Bat being gadgets that aren't really possible today, but are far from the realm of plausibility within the next several years.
I don't think that's really excusable. The movies themselves never state the year in which they're set so I'm not going to trust that it literally is in the year 2016. That's like saying Inception takes place in 2010 because that's when it was released.

Last edited by Roy Batty; 12-10-2012 at 12:09 PM..
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  #944  
Old 12-10-2012, 01:32 PM
^No worries jig, I'm having fun. I just thought it was worth pointing out funnily.

I gotta ask though -

When in TDK did they mention 2008. I'm not doubting it, just don't remember. It's probably several times and I just forgot or didn't think anything of it.

I half-tried finding something but ended up coming across this pre-TDKR thread over at IGN that I thought was pretty funny -

http://www.ign.com/boards/threads/so...ins.186947109/

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  #945  
Old 12-10-2012, 04:47 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jig Saw 123 View Post
I don't think that's really excusable. The movies themselves never state the year in which they're set so I'm not going to trust that it literally is in the year 2016. That's like saying Inception takes place in 2010 because that's when it was released.
The time stamp on the security camera footage of the Joker show July 2008, which would set TDKR sometime in 2016.

Edit: here's a screencap for ya:

Spoiler:


Along with that and the relative plausibility of the gadgets I think it's fair to admit that the first two films are set in "present day" and with the 8 year gap in TDKR it's logical to assume that it's set in the future.

Last edited by DaveyJoeG; 12-10-2012 at 08:58 PM..
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  #946  
Old 12-10-2012, 05:10 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Postmaster General View Post
What's crazy is that you're dissing a discussion for the sake of just randomly shooting down criticisms that organically arise as part of that discussion. I don't think the condescending attitude is really warranted. It's pretty cool, and perhaps a better acclaim for this film, that so many months after the movie came out, a video release gets people so eager to continue discussing it.
It would be pretty cool if people talked with this much debate/passion/time on their hands about other films too. I loved Dark Knight Rises, probably will end up somewhere in my top 10 or just outside of it, but after months have passed people are still asking "how did Bruce Wayne get back to Gotham"? and "he quit because of Rachel". Seriously? And forget the idea that what's being discussed is not the themes, social contexts, performances, Oscar potentials or whatever. But people are asking themselves why he kicked a brick wall. Just surprising, is all.

Call me condescending or what have you, I just wanted to point out my surprise and you attacked (unlike you Postmaster...)

Almost all of these "plot holes" or "inconsistencies" can be summed up by something Darth Shape said. He's Batman.

But anyway, didn't mean to piss in anyone's cup of tea. You'll continue the this on-going discussion no matter what anyone says
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  #947  
Old 12-10-2012, 06:37 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMovieMan View Post
It would be pretty cool if people talked with this much debate/passion/time on their hands about other films too. I loved Dark Knight Rises, probably will end up somewhere in my top 10 or just outside of it, but after months have passed people are still asking "how did Bruce Wayne get back to Gotham"? and "he quit because of Rachel". Seriously? And forget the idea that what's being discussed is not the themes, social contexts, performances, Oscar potentials or whatever. But people are asking themselves why he kicked a brick wall. Just surprising, is all.
I guess because the themes and "subtext" was spoken out loud through heavy handed dialog. The characters literally told us what the themes are. There is no discussion to be had because the characters already discussed & analyzed their own movie so we don't have to.

Honestly, themes & subtext are trivial & meaningless if problems in the story cause the audience to not care. Creating ideas & themes is easy. Subtly incorporating those ideas & themes into a well told & well paced story is hard. Here Nolan seriously dropped the ball for me. He has never been subtle with his use of themes, but with TDKR it was like he didn't care.
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  #948  
Old 12-10-2012, 07:48 PM
TDKR is terrific as a comic book hero themed spectacle but it sacrificed the potent intimacy of TDK for broad stroke characterizations and situations , sort of like a greatest hits version of the series .

I appreciate the first two more in light of what i witnessed in the final installment.

It's still one of the best films in it's genre but it simply never hits the heights of it's predecessors /

The narrative is too meandering to become emotional attached to the characters although there are some affecting moments . Remember how everyone seemed like a family in the first two films, they come across like acquaintances in Tdkr. I understand the fractured extended family is one of the themes ( at least to me it was ) but it just seemed like certain key characters were acting in separate films entirely

I'll still watch it another 50 times but i find myself coming back to BB and Tdk as examples of the standard that Nolan set .

No doubt though that the action sequences are thrilling and brilliant it's too bad they are in the service of a flaccid story .

Looking back, TDK was the high point for this trilogy, it got everything right .

Since people love ratings :

BB - 9
TDK - 10
TDKR - 8.5
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  #949  
Old 12-10-2012, 09:13 PM
I saw an interesting theory on how Bruce got back into Gotham on IMDB. I'll just paste part of the guy's post here:

Quote:
We see Barsad (Bane's second in command) on the bridge talking to the army captain(Bunny from the Wire!). The officer says Bane's men don't have enough to cover the entire city perimeter. Barsad replies "no, but you do".

So the army's job is to keep people from getting out, but isn't it obvious that they would let Batman in?
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  #950  
Old 12-11-2012, 12:30 AM
I'm tired of all the skepticism. It seems everywhere I go I read nothing but complaints and problems with the plot; "how did Batman get back to Gotham", "how come the guy falls through the ice but Batman stands on it comfortably", etc...so here's my take for all the skeptics:

The scale of this film is just mindblowing for a superhero film. I mean, it's hard to think back to 2005 and recall how risky Batman Begins seemed at the time, and how little fanfare it received upon its release. Especially when you look at the final entry in the trilogy and see how numerous cities bent over backwards to accommodate the shooting. The action sequences are simply incredible, and it's easy to see that Nolan drew his inspiration from the "Cast of Thousands" days of the great silent epics. Extras = scale, and it's almost inconceivable, when you look at the fight on Wall Street, that not one of those people is a CG insert. That they actually did this all for real. But they did, and that's just brilliant. The stage on which this film plays out is simply massive.

And yet, it's also startlingly intimate. Seeing Bruce grow into himself in this film is quite a thing to behold, and there's nothing else quite like it in the whole of the Batman universe. Watching him escape from the pit, recalling how his father saved him from the well as a child...now he's saving himself. It's a transcendent moment where Bruce, in a very real and meaningful sense, becomes his own man. This film actually allows Bruce Wayne to move beyond his pain and his anger...to realize that he doesn't have to be a martyr to be a hero...to actually be able to say that what he's done is enough to honor the memory of his fallen parents. That Gotham City needn't be PERFECT in order for him to have a real life. And there's a difference between simply ceasing to be Batman, and having this realization. Bruce stopped being Batman after the events of TDK...but he didn't stop NEEDING Batman, even after Gotham City seemingly did. By the end of TDKR, he no longer needs Batman. He no longer needs all of that pain, guilt, and anger. He's outgrown it. He's transcended it.

The film's not perfect...but it doesn't have to be. As an end to Bruce Wayne's journey, and a fulfillment of the themes and promises of its predecessors, it's quite beautiful.
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  #951  
Old 12-11-2012, 01:03 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Shape View Post
The film's not perfect...but it doesn't have to be. As an end to Bruce Wayne's journey, and a fulfillment of the themes and promises of its predecessors, it's quite beautiful.
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  #952  
Old 12-11-2012, 01:07 AM
Thank you, thank you...I'll be here all...well, every-other day. haha
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  #953  
Old 12-11-2012, 02:14 AM
Good catch on the security footage, Davey. I'm surprised they put that in there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMovieMan View Post
It would be pretty cool if people talked with this much debate/passion/time on their hands about other films too. I loved Dark Knight Rises, probably will end up somewhere in my top 10 or just outside of it, but after months have passed people are still asking "how did Bruce Wayne get back to Gotham"? and "he quit because of Rachel". Seriously? And forget the idea that what's being discussed is not the themes, social contexts, performances, Oscar potentials or whatever. But people are asking themselves why he kicked a brick wall. Just surprising, is all.

Call me condescending or what have you, I just wanted to point out my surprise and you attacked (unlike you Postmaster...)

Almost all of these "plot holes" or "inconsistencies" can be summed up by something Darth Shape said. He's Batman.

But anyway, didn't mean to piss in anyone's cup of tea. You'll continue the this on-going discussion no matter what anyone says
I didn't mean to sound like I was attacking, but just point out how it came off. It may have just been a case, in both our posts, where more could have been better. No bother though, I'll admit that my posts between 12/8-12/9 may have been off. It was a, um, weird 36 or so hours in there.




I've watched this a couple more times and I just keep liking it more. The ending is really good. The reaction off that kid on the bus is too awesome to describe.

My son jokingly said that the only reason Batman pretended like he killed himself was so that he could get a statue.
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  #954  
Old 12-11-2012, 02:47 AM
I just noticed today that you can see the monorail in TDKR. Nice to see they finally got it up and running again:
Image was too big to fit on the screen so click the link to see attachment:
http://i.imgur.com/r8vJy.jpg

It's a tiny thing that most people probably haven't noticed. I doubt anyone noticed it the first time they saw the film. And yet, as a visual FX shot, it was surely expensive. It just goes to show the level of dedication to even the small details when it comes to providing a sense of real continuity to this trilogy. It would have been easy to just leave the monorail out, and in general, people wouldn't have noticed a real difference. Would have saved some money and meant many hours less of FX work. But when you actually do notice it, be it on your fourth viewing, or your tenth viewing, or whatever, it's pretty great.

Most superhero series have only a very loose sense of continuity. It's always nice to see this kind of care put into a genre film...to make the films really fit together as one overall narrative. It's difficult to find another series where it's really been done. Superman II should have been a direct sequel to Superman, following Donner's original intent...but with the reshot opening in the Lester version, it really isn't. The cinematic Marvel Universe sticks pretty well to its continuity, but in the case of the sole true sequel, thusfar, Iron Man 2...it isn't really a direct narrative continuation of the first Iron Man, the events of which are rarely referenced. So far, it feels like Nolan's Batman trilogy stands alone in truly defying the notion of superhero sequels as separate adventures, and positing them as true extensions of the core narrative.
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  #955  
Old 12-11-2012, 03:55 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jig Saw 123 View Post
I'm sorry if my wording sounds like its coming off as argumentative, I really meant nothing by it.



I just think, I don't know, someone putting on a robotic knee brace that gives them the ability to kick a brick wall with their barefoot is just too much for what we've seen Bruce do previously. Then again, it could have been the shoes
It's not anymore unrealistic than flying through skyscrapers evading missiles.
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  #956  
Old 12-11-2012, 08:12 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Digifruitella View Post
It's not anymore unrealistic than flying through skyscrapers evading missiles.
And communicating without an earpiece ....I could bring up some many fucking flaws the The Avenger had, but I won't because it's a waste of time and the movie was solid fun.

Last edited by CuatroDiablos; 12-11-2012 at 08:15 AM..
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  #957  
Old 12-11-2012, 10:24 AM
Bane also punched through a stone pillar. It's a comic book movie. I'm fine with accepting those types of things.

But things that go against his character bother me more.
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  #958  
Old 12-11-2012, 04:26 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by dellamorte dellamore View Post
BB - 9
TDK - 10
TDKR - 8.5
Great minds think alike dd. Those are the exact ratings I would give each of the films as well.

I'm getting this film for Christmas so I can't wait.
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  #959  
Old 12-11-2012, 10:16 PM
Batman Begins - 9/10
The Dark Knight - 9/10
The Dark Knight Rises - 9/10

Every film has flaws. TDK is just as full of plot holes as TDKR but people just looooove the Joker sooooo much that they forgive more easily.

One of the best and most consistent trilogies of all time. Getting my Blu Ray Giftset tomorrow. OH HOW I CANNOT WAIT.
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  #960  
Old 12-11-2012, 11:27 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaMovieMan View Post
Every film has flaws. TDK is just as full of plot holes as TDKR but people just looooove the Joker sooooo much that they forgive more easily.
Agreed, each of the three movies has its strengths and weaknesses. They are pretty much equal in terms of quality.
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