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  #1  
Old 01-02-2013, 08:05 AM
I can't watch all these movies at once! (and they're not classics!)

Most of my friends and even my entire high school knows me as the resident film geek, which is fine. But then they start trying to test it, asking if I've seen this or that. And they're not asking about genuine classic filmmakers like Bergman or Coppola or Huston. No, I get asked if I've seen the classics like Half-Baked, Wedding Crashers, Lords of Dogtown, and Dude, Where's My Car? . . . and then when I say "no" to all of those, I get shit like, "How can you call yourself a film fan and not have seen these classics?"

The works of Scorsese, Hitchcock, Godard, Fellini, Allen, Chaplin, Truffaut, Kurosawa, Ozu, Keaton, Bergman, Murnau, Tarkovsky, Capra, Ford, Coppola, Huston, Kubrick, Lean, Mankiewicz, Welles, etc. are classics. Fucking Dazed and Confused is not a classic and I'm so tired of people giving me shit for having not seen it. Does this happen to anyone else?

Last edited by magjournal; 01-02-2013 at 08:07 AM..
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  #2  
Old 01-02-2013, 08:32 AM
None of those are even remotely close to being "classic". Not even modern. Well, MAYBE Wedding Crashers, which I did love. But even calling that movie a classic is a bit of a stretch. The other movies you listed aren't even good, let alone being considered a classic status. Although I never saw Half Baked.
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  #3  
Old 01-02-2013, 10:12 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovemovies View Post
None of those are even remotely close to being "classic". Not even modern. Well, MAYBE Wedding Crashers, which I did love. But even calling that movie a classic is a bit of a stretch. The other movies you listed aren't even good, let alone being considered a classic status. Although I never saw Half Baked.
I mean I don't take issue with people loving the movies, but I get sick of people telling me that I'm fake cuz I haven't seen Zoolander when I'm spending my time looking to watch movies like Persona or La Dolce Vita. And again, I'm sure Zoolander is a fine movie, but I'm not in any rush to see it.
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  #4  
Old 01-06-2013, 02:19 PM
I don't get people questioning me/hating me or whatever cuz I haven't seen pieces of shit like the ones you've mentioned. I just get kind of surprised reactions or a "you've got to see it" reply.

NO, I don't have to see "Anchorman" because it looks like shit & it's not my kinda fucking film!

So I totally hear what you're saying mag.
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  #5  
Old 01-06-2013, 03:04 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by magjournal View Post
The works of Scorsese, Hitchcock, Godard, Fellini, Allen, Chaplin, Truffaut, Kurosawa, Ozu, Keaton, Bergman, Murnau, Tarkovsky, Capra, Ford, Coppola, Huston, Kubrick, Lean, Mankiewicz, Welles, etc. are classics. Fucking Dazed and Confused is not a classic and I'm so tired of people giving me shit for having not seen it. Does this happen to anyone else?
I can totally see where you are coming from, but boy is Dazed and Confused a really, really terrible example. That movie is a classic from one of our great modern directors. It's one of the most misunderstood films by people who haven't seen it. There is a reason why it has a Criterion edition.
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  #6  
Old 01-06-2013, 03:28 PM
Meh. I've always found Dazed and Confused to be overrated. I like Linklater, but that's a movie I never got the popularity of. I don't mind plotless movies as long as the characters are engaging and that was my problem. I didn't find them to be engaging at all.
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  #7  
Old 01-06-2013, 03:38 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovemovies View Post
I didn't find them to be engaging at all.


JCPhoenix, where you at?

Last edited by Bourne101; 01-06-2013 at 03:48 PM..
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  #8  
Old 01-09-2013, 12:12 PM
Doesn't happen to me, but I'm in my mid-30s. I'll agree that none of those movies come close to what a classic is. If somebody calls you on it, I'd start spouting off some classics that they'd probably never heard of. When they have no idea what you're talking about, then you say that's what makes you a film geek.
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  #9  
Old 01-13-2013, 12:59 PM
Its kinda the opposite with me. I'm doing a film course and some of the people in my class haven't seen any of the Star Wars or Lord of the Rings movies.
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  #10  
Old 01-14-2013, 01:36 PM
First of all I'm not entirely sure why you would openly advertise yourself as a film geek. I know some people are super comfortable with themselves and that's great but by just throwing it out there you're going to get some flak. I've got a buddy who is probably the biggest film geek I know and his main claim to fame/basis of knowledge is in exploitation films (nunsploitation, nazisploitation etc...). If I asked him about classic sci-fi he would be baffled. Point being to be knowledgeable about film you don't have to have seen everything. You certainly hvae to have a good base of knowledge and reference but being a film 'expert' or 'geek' does not mean you've seen everything. I mean have you seen Ilsa, Harem Keeper of the Oil Sheiks?

This next bit is not suppose to insult younger posters but it also holds some truth that your average high-schooler does not have the greatest taste in film. Stoner flicks, like the ones you mentioned, will always be popular with that age group. When I was 16 I though Bio-Dome was a classic too (still not convinced it isn't a sleeper!).
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  #11  
Old 01-15-2013, 09:12 PM
I think cult classic is more appropriate for Dazed And Confused.

I haven't really had this experience with the few friends I do have, so I guess I'm lucky, but otherwise I agree with the OP.

There are so many older classic movies that I still want to see and I certainly am not going to be wasting my time watching stuff that isn't worth it.
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  #12  
Old 01-25-2013, 07:52 AM
If someone told me that Half-Baked, Wedding Crashers, Lords of Dogtown, and Dude, Where's My Car? were classics, I'd tell them to fuck off... Not sure if I would punch them in the face before or after telling them that though.
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  #13  
Old 01-25-2013, 06:22 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by magjournal View Post
Most of my friends and even my entire high school knows me as the resident film geek, which is fine. But then they start trying to test it, asking if I've seen this or that. And they're not asking about genuine classic filmmakers like Bergman or Coppola or Huston. No, I get asked if I've seen the classics like Half-Baked, Wedding Crashers, Lords of Dogtown, and Dude, Where's My Car? . . . and then when I say "no" to all of those, I get shit like, "How can you call yourself a film fan and not have seen these classics?"

The works of Scorsese, Hitchcock, Godard, Fellini, Allen, Chaplin, Truffaut, Kurosawa, Ozu, Keaton, Bergman, Murnau, Tarkovsky, Capra, Ford, Coppola, Huston, Kubrick, Lean, Mankiewicz, Welles, etc. are classics. Fucking Dazed and Confused is not a classic and I'm so tired of people giving me shit for having not seen it. Does this happen to anyone else?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bourne101 View Post
I can totally see where you are coming from, but boy is Dazed and Confused a really, really terrible example. That movie is a classic from one of our great modern directors. It's one of the most misunderstood films by people who haven't seen it. There is a reason why it has a Criterion edition.
What Bourne said. Your contemporaries sound like typical teenagers and they have bad taste, as is to be expected (Half-Baked is fun but most assuredly bad, the rest are just bad) but Dazed and Confused does not belong in the company of those dumb comedies. It's better than anything Capra or Mankiewicz ever made.

While I now hang out with mostly other film people, I still kind of have the reputation as the resident film geek/wiki of film knowledge, and what I get this kind of crap for is chick flicks and bad action movies. No, I really haven't seen Dirty Dancing, Sleepless in Seattle, Flashdance, or Runaway Bride. Nor have I bothered with Jean Claude Van Damme, Chuck Norris, or Steven Seagal movies. I have no reason to ever see them and so I won't. They're not surprisingly good and even (this) guys would like it. It's not a gap in my film knowledge I need to fill, it's an intentional decision to avoid crap I won't enjoy.

This also applies to a lot of musicals and big budget fantasy movies, though I won't call those crap, they're just something I know I won't like based on lots of past experiences so I don't bother seeing them (e.g. the Harry Potter movies, Sound of Music) and then subsequently get shocked responses and pleas that I just have to see them. No thanks. I don't tell you I'm appalled that you work in film and haven't seen 8 1/2 or Day for Night, don't bug me about not seeing Thor or Footloose.

Last edited by QUENTIN; 01-25-2013 at 06:48 PM..
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  #14  
Old 01-27-2013, 02:31 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by magjournal View Post
Most of my friends and even my entire high school knows me as the resident film geek, which is fine.
Holy shit mate, I had no idea you were still in high school. Can I make a suggestion that I think perhaps Quent and some others would back up? A lot of us here were the film person in our high school, the person that knew lots and lots about film and were anxious to distance ourselves from the sheer idiocy of the shit people say about movies and such in high school (though as Quent reports, it's not as though you ever escape it, even in the film industry). However, I would advise you not to be too overzealous about just jumping straight away into trying to be a film director/writer/critic whatever right out of the gate of finishing high school. Really try to learn some literature/history/philosophy/whatever interests you. I guarantee you your inclination for film will be extremely well served if you take some time to expand your horizon, and find that you really have something more to say.

(A note on this: I a lot of people who are brilliant and never attended college. They are generally contemptuous of the fact that "Oh, I never attended college, and I'm smarter and more educated than most college graduates." But this logic is missing the point: yeah, they're the same as or better than most college graduates, but they themselves would still nevertheless be vastly better off if they had gone to college. The same goes for "having something to say" in film. You may be super brilliant and have a lot more to say than most without ever attempting to broaden your horizon, but you will nevertheless find you have a lot more to say if you take the time to really learn some literature/history/languages/physics/botany/whatever).

Last edited by Gordon; 01-27-2013 at 02:36 PM..
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  #15  
Old 01-28-2013, 09:18 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordon View Post
Holy shit mate, I had no idea you were still in high school. Can I make a suggestion that I think perhaps Quent and some others would back up? A lot of us here were the film person in our high school, the person that knew lots and lots about film and were anxious to distance ourselves from the sheer idiocy of the shit people say about movies and such in high school (though as Quent reports, it's not as though you ever escape it, even in the film industry). However, I would advise you not to be too overzealous about just jumping straight away into trying to be a film director/writer/critic whatever right out of the gate of finishing high school. Really try to learn some literature/history/philosophy/whatever interests you. I guarantee you your inclination for film will be extremely well served if you take some time to expand your horizon, and find that you really have something more to say.

(A note on this: I a lot of people who are brilliant and never attended college. They are generally contemptuous of the fact that "Oh, I never attended college, and I'm smarter and more educated than most college graduates." But this logic is missing the point: yeah, they're the same as or better than most college graduates, but they themselves would still nevertheless be vastly better off if they had gone to college. The same goes for "having something to say" in film. You may be super brilliant and have a lot more to say than most without ever attempting to broaden your horizon, but you will nevertheless find you have a lot more to say if you take the time to really learn some literature/history/languages/physics/botany/whatever).
Quote:
“Forget about becoming a filmmaker. Become an intellectual, a person to whom ideas matter. Read in history, science, politics, and the arts generally. Develop your own ideas, and see what sparks they strike in relation to films.”
– David Bordwell
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  #16  
Old 01-29-2013, 05:16 PM
I get asked about movies all the time and have for years, but they are usually ones in the theater at that time.

You have a funny story. I laughed out loud. The only answer you can give to those people would be to say, "I guess we have a different view of what is and is not a classic. What you think is a classic is classic shit."
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  #17  
Old 01-29-2013, 10:50 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lost in Space View Post
First of all I'm not entirely sure why you would openly advertise yourself as a film geek. I know some people are super comfortable with themselves and that's great but by just throwing it out there you're going to get some flak. I've got a buddy who is probably the biggest film geek I know and his main claim to fame/basis of knowledge is in exploitation films (nunsploitation, nazisploitation etc...). If I asked him about classic sci-fi he would be baffled. Point being to be knowledgeable about film you don't have to have seen everything. You certainly hvae to have a good base of knowledge and reference but being a film 'expert' or 'geek' does not mean you've seen everything. I mean have you seen Ilsa, Harem Keeper of the Oil Sheiks?

This next bit is not suppose to insult younger posters but it also holds some truth that your average high-schooler does not have the greatest taste in film. Stoner flicks, like the ones you mentioned, will always be popular with that age group. When I was 16 I though Bio-Dome was a classic too (still not convinced it isn't a sleeper!).
Well I don't go around saying "Hey, I'm a film geek," but my friends know I collect and watch a lot so they ask me for recommendations, and I like being the guy who gets asked that. And then more and more people started asking so it's not like I "advertised" as you'd put it. I'm right next to the school whore as someone who's known for being good or knowledgeable at one thing. Besides, in the grand scheme of things, I'm not THAT knowledgeable. Way more than your average bear but most of you guys make me look like a cinema Neanderthal.

Quote:
Originally Posted by QUENTIN View Post
What Bourne said. Your contemporaries sound like typical teenagers and they have bad taste, as is to be expected (Half-Baked is fun but most assuredly bad, the rest are just bad) but Dazed and Confused does not belong in the company of those dumb comedies. It's better than anything Capra or Mankiewicz ever made.

While I now hang out with mostly other film people, I still kind of have the reputation as the resident film geek/wiki of film knowledge, and what I get this kind of crap for is chick flicks and bad action movies. No, I really haven't seen Dirty Dancing, Sleepless in Seattle, Flashdance, or Runaway Bride. Nor have I bothered with Jean Claude Van Damme, Chuck Norris, or Steven Seagal movies. I have no reason to ever see them and so I won't. They're not surprisingly good and even (this) guys would like it. It's not a gap in my film knowledge I need to fill, it's an intentional decision to avoid crap I won't enjoy.

This also applies to a lot of musicals and big budget fantasy movies, though I won't call those crap, they're just something I know I won't like based on lots of past experiences so I don't bother seeing them (e.g. the Harry Potter movies, Sound of Music) and then subsequently get shocked responses and pleas that I just have to see them. No thanks. I don't tell you I'm appalled that you work in film and haven't seen 8 1/2 or Day for Night, don't bug me about not seeing Thor or Footloose.
Well maybe I'm wrong about Dazed and Confused. Since I've heard about that a lot from other teens I kinda lumped it in with Half Baked but I'll give that one a chance on your recommendation.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordon View Post
Holy shit mate, I had no idea you were still in high school. Can I make a suggestion that I think perhaps Quent and some others would back up? A lot of us here were the film person in our high school, the person that knew lots and lots about film and were anxious to distance ourselves from the sheer idiocy of the shit people say about movies and such in high school (though as Quent reports, it's not as though you ever escape it, even in the film industry). However, I would advise you not to be too overzealous about just jumping straight away into trying to be a film director/writer/critic whatever right out of the gate of finishing high school. Really try to learn some literature/history/philosophy/whatever interests you. I guarantee you your inclination for film will be extremely well served if you take some time to expand your horizon, and find that you really have something more to say.

(A note on this: I a lot of people who are brilliant and never attended college. They are generally contemptuous of the fact that "Oh, I never attended college, and I'm smarter and more educated than most college graduates." But this logic is missing the point: yeah, they're the same as or better than most college graduates, but they themselves would still nevertheless be vastly better off if they had gone to college. The same goes for "having something to say" in film. You may be super brilliant and have a lot more to say than most without ever attempting to broaden your horizon, but you will nevertheless find you have a lot more to say if you take the time to really learn some literature/history/languages/physics/botany/whatever).
My plan is to major in either journalism, communications, or political science (starting college this fall, haven't gotten anything back yet from schools) with a minor in film. If I do journalism or communications, I'll do that and maybe weasel my way into criticism. If I do political science, I wanna make documentaries. I dunno, I haven't decided that yet. But I wasn't planning on making films really (aside from the documentaries). Not a creative bone in my body, to be honest. I'm better at shitting on other people's creations.
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  #18  
Old 01-30-2013, 08:07 AM
I have often been in the same situation you have been and as annoying as it can be when someone your own age is so fixated to the films they love that they find it appalling when others haven't seen them, well just try to mend with it. People are different today and always changing, but there will always be those like us who have a broader mind in regards to film, who find appreciation in a silent film in age too loud, and so on and so on.

I'm probably one of two people my age on my ship who has seen and loved Casablanca, just have to find that other mysterious man now.
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  #19  
Old 01-31-2013, 01:48 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by QUENTIN View Post

Nor have I bothered with Jean Claude Van Damme, Chuck Norris, or Steven Seagal movies. I have no reason to ever see them and so I won't. They're not surprisingly good and even (this) guys would like it. It's not a gap in my film knowledge I need to fill, it's an intentional decision to avoid crap I won't enjoy.
You're really missing out on Bloodsport. Cinematic masterpiece

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  #20  
Old 01-31-2013, 03:32 AM
second that
but I would also second anything else he's in, he's my bro.
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  #21  
Old 02-12-2013, 12:04 AM
I've had this happen to me a lot too, but as Elvis Costello once said, "I used to be disgusted, and now I try to be amused." I can maybe understand how people would be baffled that I haven't seen The Avengers just because of how much it made at the box office, but some of my co-workers have said things to me like, "What?! You haven't seen Out of Time? I know you love movies, so you HAVE to see that." I can certainly understand how a person could be entertained by a movie like that, but I guess I just can't wrap my head around anybody considering that a must-see. The worst is when they follow it up with a statement like, "I thought you were a movie buff!" That's just really kind of condescending at that point, as though professing to love movies requires you to see every single middle-of-the-road Hollywood thriller/rom-com/comedy released.

I mean, I don't go around saying, "You haven't seen Citizen Kane? What's wrong with you?!" I realize that at this point in time the only people still watching Citizen Kane are cinephiles/movie buffs/whatever you want to call them. And that's fine. Being well versed in cinema does not make me better than people who aren't, but I do sometimes wish that people who aren't cinephiles would just trust me that if I intentionally haven't seen a movie, there's a reason for my decision to avoid it.

It kind of reminds me of Nick Frost's character in Hot Fuzz:
"YOU AIN'T SEEN BAD BOYS II?!"
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  #22  
Old 03-13-2013, 10:01 PM
Umm if any of you were really a film buff you would have seen all those movies people asked you about, that's why it's a life choice and you have to make it your whole life, wake up watch movies until you pass out, make sure to get a job where you can either watch movies at work or at least talk film at your job. And if your house isn't a temple of your favorite films then just leave now. Other recommendations to qualify as a film buff, must be able to quote everything, must wear movie related clothing (t-shirts aren't enough), if you have pets they must be named different Tarintino characters, must know the release date, RT% and box office numbers of every film of all time. All the music you listen to is from soundtracks PHSYC you don't have time to listen to music only music you hear is while you are watching movies. Must have taken out a second mortgage to have funded your already outdated home theater. If you were somehow married, a movie themed wedding is a nessascity. All your birthday presents well any present is either dvd's or blu-rays, but most ppl who buy you presents knows you well enough to know you already own that so now you have a 100 different versions of scene-it, which you play by yourself because you enjoy playing with the only person who can challenge you!

Last edited by DareDevil; 03-13-2013 at 10:07 PM..
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