#1  
Old 06-04-2003, 11:00 PM
Why Do You Love "Catcher In The Rye?"

Well, I just read "Catcher In the Rye" it was pretty decent. It's about a boy who misses his brother. A rather depressed child acting out.

It was interesting the way Salinger used kind of subliminal messages to pull the reader in: "people are always getting in your way." And the very many times Holden said so many things depressed him. It's also written as if the character Holden actually wrote it. Written the way people talk and the spelling errors and all. It was a good book, but I didn't feel a thing. So why is it such a classic among classics?
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  #2  
Old 06-04-2003, 11:13 PM

Was it your first time reading it? It gets better every time, give it another go in a couple of months...

It's my favorite book and I try to read it at least two, three times a year. You're right, throughout the book you actually feel what Holden is going through, I personally identify with him spotting all these phonies and getting depressed at seeing the simplest of things (i.e. His sick teacher sitting there in the room, the girls at the bar, the call-girl, etc.).

I think why it's considered a classic is because it's so genuine and thought-provoking. It's sad at many times and makes you feel like you're not so alone when everything in the world seems to be falling all around you. It's also got very funny moments and describes a New York City that is just magical (I love the part where Salinger describes the Christmas shows at Radio City Music Hall).

That's just one of the reasons I love it. I'm sure everybody has their own feelings on it and different reasons for loving it.


P.S. I often use "godamn" in my vocabulary now due to this book!

Last edited by Indiana Sev; 06-04-2003 at 11:27 PM..
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  #3  
Old 06-05-2003, 12:47 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by Indiana Sev
That's just one of the reasons I love it. I'm sure everybody has their own feelings on it and different reasons for loving it.
I love the book for similar reasons you do. I found it very raw and honest and one of the rare occasions where I am reading a book and feeling like I am glancing into someone's personal diary. Not a thread of fabrication or manipulation everywhere in the story.

Brendan, I am sorry the book didn't move you in the same way it moved me. I read it when I was 15 and felt like it somehow changed my life. If you find a book that effects you in the same way, please be sure to recommend it to me.
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  #4  
Old 06-05-2003, 05:27 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by flowrchild
I love the book for similar reasons you do. I found it very raw and honest and one of the rare occasions where I am reading a book and feeling like I am glancing into someone's personal diary. Not a thread of fabrication or manipulation everywhere in the story.
Yes. I completely agree, flowrchild.

I always saw Holden Caulfield as a cynical, depressed, and angst-filled adolescent trying to find his own meaning in the world. His constant observations about what he encounters, from his teachers to all the phonies, it just captures the essence of alienation that almost everyone experiences.

Holden reaches a point in his life where he doesn't know what the hell he wants and what's gonna happen next. It's the painful transition of becoming an adult and accepting your responsibilites. He even makes a futile attempt to preserve the innocence Phoebe still has. Everyone can identify with this realistic coming of age story. And it seemed as if J.D. Salinger wrote it personally for me when I read it at the age of sixteen.

Last edited by Slim; 06-05-2003 at 05:32 PM..
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  #5  
Old 06-05-2003, 08:38 PM
I think Caulfield was a regular teenager, who feels the same feelings of alienation as many others, but doesn't know how to deal with them. I love the book because I really identified with Holden. I also liked the psychological aspects. It's obvious he was going through some kind of prolonged post-traumatic stress disorder
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  #6  
Old 06-06-2003, 03:05 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by Indiana Sev
Was it your first time reading it? It gets better every time, give it another go in a couple of months...

It's my favorite book and I try to read it at least two, three times a year. You're right, throughout the book you actually feel what Holden is going through, I personally identify with him spotting all these phonies and getting depressed at seeing the simplest of things (i.e. His sick teacher sitting there in the room, the girls at the bar, the call-girl, etc.).

I think why it's considered a classic is because it's so genuine and thought-provoking. It's sad at many times and makes you feel like you're not so alone when everything in the world seems to be falling all around you. It's also got very funny moments and describes a New York City that is just magical (I love the part where Salinger describes the Christmas shows at Radio City Music Hall).

That's just one of the reasons I love it. I'm sure everybody has their own feelings on it and different reasons for loving it.


P.S. I often use "godamn" in my vocabulary now due to this book!
I couldn't have said it better!!!
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  #7  
Old 06-06-2003, 02:34 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by Indiana Sev


P.S. I often use "godamn" in my vocabulary now due to this book!

You're certainly not alone on that.

Anyway, this book has a perfect blend of happiness (with the humor) and sadness (particularly scenes between Holden and Pheobe).
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