#1  
Old 12-01-2006, 06:04 PM
Shakespeare

Ok, what's everyone's opinion on the Bard? I have a love/hate relationship with his works. Some of his stuff I think is great, while I can't stand others. The big problem I have with him is his dialouge. I know, his writing is consitered to be of the higest quality, but personally most of it gives me a headache. Saying that, I will say that I'm huge fan of his tragedy's. Titus, Macbeth, King Lear, Hamlet and Romeo and Julliet are all great. The one Im not quite sure of is Othello. Just finnished reading it, and although I loved the themes in it, and the story itself, a major portion of it bored me. What does eveyone else think?
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  #2  
Old 12-05-2006, 09:42 PM
I'm not very well read on Shakespeare (particularly his comedies, I'm not familiar with any of them) but I religiously praise "Hamlet" and adore "Romeo & Juliet".
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  #3  
Old 12-06-2006, 07:10 AM
I'm not an expert either but his writing is stunning. Even more so considering the time.

Romeo & Juliet is quite simply brilliant and rehashed in almost every story we see today.

As for his other books i'm a little ashamed to say I haven't read them.
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  #4  
Old 12-06-2006, 10:32 AM
I love his tragedies more so than his comedies, with Hamlet being the predictable list capper in that category. I love everything about that play -- the characters, the writing, the motivations, the tragic flaw that doesn't permit Hamlet to act at the right time, etc.

A lesser known play of his, Measure for Measure, also involves some devious plot schematics and potentially tragic events, but at the same time it's also one of Shakespeare's lighter efforts. An effortless mixture of the two genres.
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  #5  
Old 12-06-2006, 03:35 PM
He certainly hasn't written much lately.....
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  #6  
Old 12-07-2006, 03:45 AM
...writers block.
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  #7  
Old 12-09-2006, 01:22 PM
I never "got" Shakespeare until I saw Orson Welles perform a soliloquy--I was immediately hooked.

I'm a fan of his comedies, Much Ado about Nothing is one of my favorite plays and movies, I feel that this genre really misses out these days because they're not funny to read, but definitely funny to hear.
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  #8  
Old 12-09-2006, 01:43 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by TATU
He certainly hasn't written much lately.....
Give the man a break. That with being dead and all, I don't see him having that much time to write anymore.

Now that I've been funny for today, has anyone read (or watched) Rosencratz And Guildestein Are Dead? The premise sounds really interesting, and as a comedy it might be very entertaining.
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  #9  
Old 12-09-2006, 01:47 PM
I haven't done extensive reading of Shakespeare, but I know his key works very well and have even performed some of them. His dialogue is absolutely fantastic, and in Much Ado particularily, he maintains a fantastic tempo of conversation with stunning wit.
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  #10  
Old 12-09-2006, 09:49 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by X-Nightcrawler
Give the man a break. That with being dead and all, I don't see him having that much time to write anymore.

Now that I've been funny for today, has anyone read (or watched) Rosencratz And Guildestein Are Dead? The premise sounds really interesting, and as a comedy it might be very entertaining.
See it, see it, see it. It's a GREAT movie (Tim Roth and Gary Oldman...all...together, like), and an (if possible) better play.

It's in my top movies 50 or so flicks of all time.

Have I mentioned it rules?
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  #11  
Old 12-13-2006, 03:36 PM
i havent read much of his work but i loved Macbeth
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  #12  
Old 12-14-2006, 02:57 PM
I've always found Shakespear to be decisively formulaic. This guy loves that chick, but that chick loves this other guy, but this dudes really a chick, etc...etc...

Or...

All is well with this guy, but he's forced to make a life changing decision, but little does he know he's being betrayed by those closest to him, but no worries someone whom he didnt expect as an ally will save him, but then his friend/lover dies, but then he gets betrayed again, etc...etc...

Also, much as in poetry (excluding free-verse), he wrote to cater to said formula. Much of his writing (such as his headache-inducing dialogue) molded to fit into Iambic Pantameter, which basically means that every line must have no more or no less than ten syllables. So basically, all of his quarky slang which has become so revered (such as adding 'rst to the end of EVERYTHING) is only written out that way too conform to the ten syllable rule.

That being said, Romeo & Juliet and Macbeth are FANTASTIC, timeless tales that will never age. Shakespear was certainly the best scribe of his time, but this whole "greatest writer to ever live" thing is pushing it. He's not even close.

Oh, and has anyone else heard of the new Macbeth film with Sean Bean in the titular role?

BEST. CASTING. EVER.
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  #13  
Old 07-04-2007, 08:51 PM

I was forced to read Romeo and Juliet and Merchant of Venice in high school and they were a couple of the hardest books I ever had to sit through. I mean I'm sure that if I lived in his time I might have liked them but after more than 300 years it is just too much of a struggle to understand and get into them. I don't plan on reading up on any of his other works. Well thats all for now GOoD JOURNEY my fellow schmoes.
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  #14  
Old 08-21-2007, 02:17 PM
As a wannabe pro-actor I've chosen to read Shakespeare a few times and I have to say he is a great writer and both the comedies and tragedies interest and entertain me. I've read 9 and am currently reading Hamlet.

Personal favourite so-far: A Midsummer Nights Dream closely followed by Richard III
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