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  #41  
Old 07-25-2007, 04:33 AM
I laughed out loud when Kreacher went after Mundungus with the frying pan, it was just so random and funny.

I was also a bit confused by the end of the story with the whole Elder wand though... like how was it Draco's wand? I didn't try too hard to figure it out though because I didn't really care to be honest.

Also, anyone else think the epilogue was EXTREEEEEMELY corny? I was literally cringing at how forced it was.
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  #42  
Old 07-25-2007, 05:49 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by smok3h
I was also a bit confused by the end of the story with the whole Elder wand though... like how was it Draco's wand? I didn't try too hard to figure it out though because I didn't really care to be honest.
It was Draco's because at the end of Half Blood Prince, he disarmed Dumbeldore and the wand then recognized Draco as it's new master because it was defeated by him. Then, Harry defeated Draco at the "Malfoy Manor" and so the Eldar Want, though never in their possessions, became Harry's. That's why he was able to defeat Voldermort.
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  #43  
Old 07-25-2007, 08:06 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by the_sneaker
It was Draco's because at the end of Half Blood Prince, he disarmed Dumbeldore and the wand then recognized Draco as it's new master because it was defeated by him. Then, Harry defeated Draco at the "Malfoy Manor" and so the Eldar Want, though never in their possessions, became Harry's. That's why he was able to defeat Voldermort.
Funny thing is I just brought this up in the other thread. So how did he defeat Draco? What exactly do you have to do to 'defeat' someone to get that wand? Draco wasn't using it at the time- that's what makes it stupid.

So if Harry is practicing spells with his son and his son disarms him and 'defeats' him in the duel, does that mean that his son will become the owner even though Harry isn't using the wand?
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  #44  
Old 07-25-2007, 06:49 PM
It doesn't matter if he was using it. The Wand only recognizes one master, when one wizard proves to be superior to it's present master, it changes it's allegiance.
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  #45  
Old 07-25-2007, 11:43 PM
This is my fav of the bunch, with 5 being a close 2nd....I loved everything about it and actually teared up a bit when Fred got it...that really sucked...it hadn't occured to me until reading this thread, but whoever posted this was right...Nevil deserved to kill Bellatrix...I loved that Mrs. Weasly, just one of the numerous characters getting butcherd in the flicks, got to have one final moment of rage though...

I just want more...another 14 books to start off with...seven for Albus Potter and seven of James Potter Sr. along with Sirius and Lupin, and everybody...I'd love to read about who the OG gang became animanguses and how James eventually won over Lily...

My favorite part of the books, and the reason the movies are not as entertaining for me is the whole "school" feel. I like that the main concern of the characters in book five is their OWLs as opposed to Voldemort....just reading about how they live and interact at school is the best part of the books for me, so it was weird that this one, which is very plot heavy with goals and conflicts popping up should be my favorite...but it is...the action and development of all the characters is so well done, particually the escape from GRINGOTS...holy crap that's gonna be amazing on flim, even if everything else is ruined...

my favorite momets are:
Ginny and Harry kissing on his B-day
Dudly and Harry's goodbye
Lily's Letter to Sirius about Harry's first birthday
Harry rescuing Mad Eye's eye from the ministry
Harry and Ron splitting up...Ron's a "git" and they were better off w/out him
Harry's parents grave
Percy's return
Nevel's transformation complete from loser to hero
and the final flash forward with the adult Harry saying good bye to his kids


if no more books will ever come, and this is all there is...well that'll be enough...I read the first book on a long car ride back on new years eve of '99 and when I got back in 2000 a week later bought the already released 2 and 3...I was Harry's age, 15, as I read the fifth book the day it was released and now, a year older than he is at 18, I feel so much like my childhood is coming to a close...I'll miss you Harry, and everybody else who ever stepped foot in Hogwarts...you were good friends to discuss with my real friends as I grew up and you've been with me for so long...thanks for everything you guys, and Fred, being named George, as well as being a bit of a joker, I always thought you you as my favorite character...RIP...and good bye.
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  #46  
Old 07-26-2007, 04:38 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by Ender
It doesn't matter if he was using it. The Wand only recognizes one master, when one wizard proves to be superior to it's present master, it changes it's allegiance.
Sneaky little bastard wand....


...but yeah, i actualy found that funny about it. "eh/ your stronger? Time to change sides!"
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  #47  
Old 07-26-2007, 07:49 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by Ender
It doesn't matter if he was using it. The Wand only recognizes one master, when one wizard proves to be superior to it's present master, it changes it's allegiance.
Snape avada kedavra'ed Dumbledore but it's Draco who is superior because he disarmed him. And Harry is superior to Draco because he physically wrestled three wands out of Draco's grip even though none of those wands were The Wand.

Okay, I'm having a drink at the bar with my mates. We're getting shit-faced celebrating some quidditch match. I have The Wand but it's locked away and I'm using just some run of the mill wand. That night when I get home, I realize I've lost this regular wand. Back at the bar some red neck version of a wizard finds it lying on the floor in the bathroom and decides to keep it. Wow now he is the rightful master of the greatest wand in history. Thumbs up JK Rowling.
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  #48  
Old 07-26-2007, 11:09 AM
the interview jo did with nbc aired this morning on the today show. she gave some more information about the future of our favorite characters.

some info:

both harry and ron become aurors
and teddy tonks was making out with bill and fleurs oldest daughter
more info at the link

http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/19959323/
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  #49  
Old 07-26-2007, 03:01 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by Asa_Phelps
Okay, I'm having a drink at the bar with my mates. We're getting shit-faced celebrating some quidditch match. I have The Wand but it's locked away and I'm using just some run of the mill wand. That night when I get home, I realize I've lost this regular wand. Back at the bar some red neck version of a wizard finds it lying on the floor in the bathroom and decides to keep it. Wow now he is the rightful master of the greatest wand in history. Thumbs up JK Rowling.
Dont blame Rowling for your drunken antics.
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  #50  
Old 07-26-2007, 05:21 PM
So am I the only one that thought the epilogue was dumb and forced?
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  #51  
Old 07-26-2007, 07:17 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by Asa_Phelps
Snape avada kedavra'ed Dumbledore but it's Draco who is superior because he disarmed him. And Harry is superior to Draco because he physically wrestled three wands out of Draco's grip even though none of those wands were The Wand.

Okay, I'm having a drink at the bar with my mates. We're getting shit-faced celebrating some quidditch match. I have The Wand but it's locked away and I'm using just some run of the mill wand. That night when I get home, I realize I've lost this regular wand. Back at the bar some red neck version of a wizard finds it lying on the floor in the bathroom and decides to keep it. Wow now he is the rightful master of the greatest wand in history. Thumbs up JK Rowling.
No, it is a big deus ex machina, like the rest of the book. Don't know how to get out of a situation? Use Magic! (Kinda like the Force if you read any Star Wars novels.)

If you go back and read the part where Harry is hiding out at Bill and Fleur's, he is talking to Olliander the wand maker (sorry if his name is wrong), Olliander tells him that mastery of a wand is tricky business and that just taking a wand doesn't mean you are the master of it (as in Voldemort just took it from Dumbledore's body). Draco was the master of the wand because of the situation in the Half Blood Prince. Since Harry bested Draco in almost every important situation, Harry was able to master the wand by force of will. Plus Harry had already understood the power in the invisibiliaty cloak and the resurrection stone, Harry was king of the Deathly Hallows, the wand wanted to be controlled by the person in control of the Deathly Hallows.

Last edited by ILuvNachos; 07-26-2007 at 07:21 PM..
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  #52  
Old 07-26-2007, 10:43 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by smok3h
So am I the only one that thought the epilogue was dumb and forced?
It was a tad corny, but I didn't think it was dumb.
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  #53  
Old 07-27-2007, 12:57 AM
Yeah, dumb was a poor word choice. I didn't hate it, I just thought it was forced and corny as hell.
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  #54  
Old 07-27-2007, 08:25 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by smok3h
Yeah, dumb was a poor word choice. I didn't hate it, I just thought it was forced and corny as hell.
I liked it. I especially liked the nod between Draco and Harry.
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  #55  
Old 07-28-2007, 04:19 AM

Quote:
Originally posted by jolanar
I liked it. I especially liked the nod between Draco and Harry.
Yeah. I really liked that part and the part where Harry explained why he names his kid what he did.
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  #56  
Old 07-28-2007, 05:38 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by jolanar
I liked it. I especially liked the nod between Draco and Harry.
So did I! If anything, I was hoping for a bit of a reprieve from the Malfoy clan. Not necessarily them saying "Oh, gosh, we're so sorry we caused so much trouble," but I would have enjoyed a conversation between Harry and Draco like the conversation between Harry and Dudley: them putting away their swords. Harry knew that Draco was not the dark wizard he wanted everyone to think in the first five books (and part of the sixth book) and therefore, I think there really could have been a good connection between the two characters who really despised each other for nearly 8 years.
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  #57  
Old 07-28-2007, 08:59 AM
Overall, this is about tied with Goblet of Fire for my favorite book in the series. Thank God cause after Order of the Phoenix and Half-Blood Prince (both of which I found subpar) I was worried the ending wouldn't live up to everything.

That said, I saw the Snape/Dumbledore thing coming since Half-Blood Prince as I'm sure a lot of people did. No matter what happened in this book, there was never once where it convinced me that Snape really was working with Voldemort - it's been a while since I read Half-Blood Prince but the way that it all went down in that book made it really clear to me that Snape wasn't evil. Nonetheless, despite its predictability, that still remains possibly the best storyline in the Harry Potter universe for me...the Snape stuff at the end of Deathly Hallows was possibly my favorite out of the entire series - especially his reasoning behind everything...it just made him a great tragic character.

I do agree with people that the middle bit is slow when Harry and Hermione are alone and Ron's departure really sucks the life out of that portion of the book but it picks right back up fairly shortly.

Just about the only thing that I really didn't like about this installment was the epilogue - it just didn't really fit to me, it felt like literally just trying to cram in every name that we needed to know and every character into the space of a few pages. As a meeting at King's Crossing, it was only designed to give us a status update on the characters - which is okay I guess, but I prefer something more to actually happen in an epilogue. I was actually quite surprised cause I also felt like the dialogue and everything about the epilogue was incongruous with the rest of the book - it all felt like she rushed the writing of it. It just felt like watching a news channel trying to impart as much information in as fast a time as possible, rather than a piece of storytelling and I think even an epilogue should still be told in style rather than just for information's sake.

But overall, great final chapter.
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  #58  
Old 07-28-2007, 01:58 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by JCPhoenix
I I was actually quite surprised cause I also felt like the dialogue and everything about the epilogue was incongruous with the rest of the book - it all felt like she rushed the writing of it. It just felt like watching a news channel trying to impart as much information in as fast a time as possible, rather than a piece of storytelling and I think even an epilogue should still be told in style rather than just for information's sake.

But overall, great final chapter.
That's because she wrote it awhile ago.
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  #59  
Old 07-28-2007, 04:15 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by Shockwave
Dont blame Rowling for your drunken antics.
Okay, this was obviously a hypothetical situation. Like I'd actually get drunk enough to lose my wand. Please!

Quote:
Originally posted by ILuvNachos
If you go back and read the part where Harry is hiding out at Bill and Fleur's, he is talking to Olliander the wand maker (sorry if his name is wrong), Olliander tells him that mastery of a wand is tricky business and that just taking a wand doesn't mean you are the master of it (as in Voldemort just took it from Dumbledore's body). Draco was the master of the wand because of the situation in the Half Blood Prince. Since Harry bested Draco in almost every important situation, Harry was able to master the wand by force of will.
Wow . . that's actually a really good explanation. I mean the whole wand mastery business still has that air of coping out about it but now I no longer consider it ridiculous.

Quote:
Originally posted by JCPhoenix
Nonetheless, despite its predictability, that still remains possibly the best storyline in the Harry Potter universe for me...the Snape stuff at the end of Deathly Hallows was possibly my favorite out of the entire series - especially his reasoning behind everything...it just made him a great tragic character.
I agree with what you're saying and despite Snape being my faviourite character, I understand that life isn't all sunshine and daisies and I shouldn't be surprised at what happened. But I would have liked more of an emotional reaction from Harry after he learned of the Prince's tale.
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  #60  
Old 07-30-2007, 07:04 PM
I finished the book, and i gotta say that this was a great and satisfying ending to the Harry Potter series! Sure, the epilouge kinda let me down in concern with other characters, but i still loved it for what it was. Also, the chapter where harry realizes he has to sacrifice himself was probably the most powerful chapter next to voldermorts resurrection. I dont know why, but his talk with sirius, his mother and father, and lupin just got to me.
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  #61  
Old 08-01-2007, 08:23 AM
If I remember right, Rowling wrote the epilogue to the series after plotting the series out after the first book.

She wrote it a decade ago and only marginally edited it. Cut her some slack.
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  #62  
Old 08-01-2007, 11:10 PM
There is no doubt that this is the best book in the series. It is soooooo good. Snape is the man, and the last chapter (19 Years Later) was great and I love how Harry named his kids after people who had died.
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  #63  
Old 08-02-2007, 01:16 AM
I thought it was a very good ending. Like the rest of the books some of it was uneven and some of it was obvious filler(but Rowling makes some good filler). I have minor complaints, but I definitely rank it as my second favourite of the books, next to Azkaban.

I was shocked that my favourite character died(Lupin), yet I felt the most emotionally about Fred's death. I mean, Snape's, Moody's, even Dobby's deaths I predicted, but Fred just shocked me. Maybe it's because Lupin's death seemed like an afterthought(although it fit with Harry having no more father figures, becoming his own man, etc. and it completed the beautiful walking to his death scene with his family around him). But Fred . . . wow. I just felt so bad for George. I would have liked to read about him more after Fred's death, it would have been like he was missing half of himself. Sad stuff.

Oh, and who else wants a series of swashbuckling wizard adventures with the dashing and charming Teddy Lupin?
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  #64  
Old 08-03-2007, 12:15 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by Scarfather
If I remember right, Rowling wrote the epilogue to the series after plotting the series out after the first book.

She wrote it a decade ago and only marginally edited it. Cut her some slack.
That is no excuse. She didn't feel like rewriting 3 pages after she just finished five thousand? It would have taken what... 15 minutes tops? I probably would have preferred nothing over the little taste she gave us. That is unless she is planning a sequel about one of the kids, in which case I say... bring it on!
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  #65  
Old 08-03-2007, 01:35 AM
In case anyone was wondering what happened to the characters between the last chapter and the epilogue.

Quote:
LONDON , England (AP) -- Just because J.K. Rowling has stopped writing about Harry Potter and his friends and foes doesn't mean she has stopped thinking about them.

She told fans Monday what she thinks happened to many of the book's characters after the final installment.

In a 90-minute live Web chat, she fielded some of the approximately 120,000 questions submitted by devotees. It was her first public comment since "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows" -- the last book in the series -- debuted on July 21.

Rowling said she was elated to share with fans the secrets she'd been harboring since she conjured up the idea for the boy wizard during a train journey across England in 1990.

"It is great to be able to do this at last," she said. "I've looked forward to it for so long!"

"Deathly Hallows" sold over 10 million copies in its first weekend. All seven books in the blockbuster series have sold a combined 335 million copies worldwide. Photo Gallery: Fans wait for the big moment of release

In the novel -- which centers on Harry's journey to kill Lord Voldemort, the most powerful dark wizard of all time -- the young wizard learns of three powerful magical objects called the Deathly Hallows that, when combined, will make their owner the Master of Death, meaning he or she accepts mortality without fear.

Rowling said in the online chat the hallows were in part inspired by "The Pardoner's Tale," one of Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales" about greed and death.

Rowling shared with fans, many of whom said they'd read the final book several times in the last week, where she imagines their favorite characters went after the series' conclusion.

SPOILER ALERT: Those who do not wish to know what happens to the characters after the book ends should stop reading here.

Rowling said the world was a sunnier, happier place after the seventh book and the death of Voldemort.

Harry Potter, who always voiced a desire to become an Auror, or someone who fights dark wizards, was named head of the Auror Department under the new wizarding government headed by his friend and ally, Kingsley Shacklebolt.

His wife, Ginny Weasley, stuck with her athletic career, playing for the Holyhead Harpies, the all-female Quidditch team. Eventually, Ginny left the team to raise their three children -- James, Albus and Lily -- while writing as the senior Quidditch correspondent for the wizarding newspaper, the Daily Prophet.

Harry's best friend Ron Weasley joined his brother, George, as a partner at their successful joke shop, Weasley's Wizard Wheezes. Hermione Granger, Ron's wife and the third person of the series' dark wizard fighting trio, furthered the rights of subjugated creatures, such as house elves, in the Department for the Regulation and Control of Magical Creatures before joining the magical law enforcement squad. The couple had two children -- Rose and Hugo.

Luna Lovegood, Harry's airily distracted friend with a love for imaginary animals who joins the fight against Voldemort in the Order of the Phoenix, becomes a famous wizarding naturalist who eventually marries the grandson of Newt Scamander, author of "Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them."

And what Muggle, or non-wizard, song would have been played at the funeral of Albus Dumbledore, the most brilliant and talented wizard the world had ever known?

"Surely 'I Did It My Way' by Frank Sinatra," Rowling told her fans, referring to the song "My Way," written by Paul Anka but popularized by Sinatra, among other singers.

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As the chat wrapped up, Rowling thanked readers for their loyalty to the series.

"What can I say? Thank you so much for sticking with me, and with Harry, for so long. You have made this an incredible journey for Harry's author."
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  #66  
Old 08-03-2007, 04:36 AM
Heh.

"I did it my way" is the perfect choice to play at the funeral. Itd be cool to see that in the movie, but i really doubt itd ever happen.
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  #67  
Old 08-06-2007, 03:05 PM
I wouldn't mind seeing more books that show Ron and Harry's adventures as Aurors. I wouldn't mind more books at all, just not with the kids because they would start doing the same things as their parents.

The book was an excellent end to a great series. Like I said, I hope she will write another book. Good series are hard to find.

I would like to know how they plan to make this into 1 movie. I don't think they could cut much out at all. I see it being 2 movies. Everything was important and excluding what might be minor details, could hurt the overall movie.
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  #68  
Old 08-11-2007, 02:47 PM
If there were more books Harry would need to die pretty early on to make me believe in them. Despite what people say Harry was only ever average, he was just perfetly suited to bring down V.
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  #69  
Old 08-12-2007, 09:13 PM
That is true Adam. Hermione carried Harry and Ron. Without her, they would have died a long time ago.
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  #70  
Old 08-12-2007, 10:01 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by adamjohnson
If there were more books Harry would need to die pretty early on to make me believe in them. Despite what people say Harry was only ever average, he was just perfetly suited to bring down V.
Well to be fair it can be damn hard to study when people keep trying to kill you each year.
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  #71  
Old 08-12-2007, 10:06 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by shoe1985
That is true Adam. Hermione carried Harry and Ron. Without her, they would have died a long time ago.
Well that's what I liked so much about the books. He was not this fantastic, brilliant wizard. For 11 years, he had no idea what he was, and in school, he was always so tied up on what else was going on, that he always put his schoolwork last on this list. Luckily, he had Hermione there to help for that. But it's not like Harry would have been killed off without those two there so quickly. Remember, and this was the point that Rowling and Dumbeldore tried to push so much, it was not just luck that saved Harry. In the "Chamber of Secrets," even though he thought he was dying (even at 12-years-old) he put all thought of himself aside as he watched his best friends sister dying and slammed that Basalisk fang into the diary, which did help in the long run, but he did not realize it. He assumed he was dying, accepted that fact, and decided to try a last ditch effort to get rid of Riddle. Same thing in "Deathly Hallows." Before he knew exactly what was going to happen if he let Voldermort kill him, he accepted the fact that he had to die.

That was what made him such a great wizard, was his courage to accept the things he could not change, and the love and loyalty he had for everyone else. Dumbeldore was right. Love was the weapon that took down Voldermort.
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  #72  
Old 08-12-2007, 10:29 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by shoe1985
That is true Adam. Hermione carried Harry and Ron. Without her, they would have died a long time ago.
Hermione is "Sam" to Harry and Ron's "Frodo"...
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  #73  
Old 08-13-2007, 09:36 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by jolanar
Well to be fair it can be damn hard to study when people keep trying to kill you each year.
Yeah, but its not just that. In year 5 he ws supposed to be learning occlumency to save his skin. Instead he was like, "Nah, I dont like Snape, I think I'll go play quidditch instead!"

In book 6, after his godfather has been killed, I would be doing fuck all I could do to learn every powerful spell and defensive magic I could. I dont think Harry learned ANYTHING significant that year, with the exception of 'tag along' apparition.

Book 7, after you know who has died, I'd be doing magic every second of every day at the Dursleys. Instead he ust sits around again.

It doesnt matter that Harry is brave , he's also an idiot sometimes. With the exception of the Imperius curse and the Patronum what he has he been REALLY good at? Not much. So I'd like to see how good of an auror he would be, and ho whe would constantly be made fun of when he cant do a simple potion with the Prince's book.
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  #74  
Old 08-14-2007, 01:03 AM
Oh don't get me wrong I agree.

7 years and he still uses the fucking disarm spell. Your a wizard how about some fireballs for christ's sake!

One of the things I've noticed that always bugs me (and i'll use the movies for an example) is that after years Harry still doesn't automatically assume magic is at work and is amazed by things that are commonplace in the magic world. For example in Goblet of Fire at the Quidditch world cup, Harry watches the entire Weasley family walk into a small tent. Fucking duh! Everyone in the goddamn audience knows its a magical goddamn tent. But noooo Harry has a look of confusion on his face and when he walks in the tent he is surprised and says "I love magic."
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  #75  
Old 08-14-2007, 11:43 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by jolanar
Oh don't get me wrong I agree.

7 years and he still uses the fucking disarm spell. Your a wizard how about some fireballs for christ's sake!

One of the things I've noticed that always bugs me (and i'll use the movies for an example) is that after years Harry still doesn't automatically assume magic is at work and is amazed by things that are commonplace in the magic world. For example in Goblet of Fire at the Quidditch world cup, Harry watches the entire Weasley family walk into a small tent. Fucking duh! Everyone in the goddamn audience knows its a magical goddamn tent. But noooo Harry has a look of confusion on his face and when he walks in the tent he is surprised and says "I love magic."
That always felt extremely natural. But of course he'd be surprised. He's learning about the world, it's like a 4 year old by that time. Besides, remember there aren't "These are some cool things we wizards have in this world" courses in Hogwarts.
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