#1  
Old 04-27-2009, 01:26 AM
The Divine Comedy

Quiet simply I want to discuss this amazing piece of literature.

I've always been interested in this book or epic you could call it, but I have never set down and actually read it. I tried a few times to read the Longfellow translation, but it justw asn't doing it for me. And this disappointed me, because I love the idea of this story and desperately wanted to read it. So after two years of searching for the time to read it and a translation I liked, I have finally begun my journey through this tale.

A little extra tidbit that I'm sure no one cares about, but I'm gonna bring it up anyways so here goes. I've always loved reading and have always had an interest in old literature. I have been struggling to decide what I want to major in while in college. I knew I wanted to be a teacher, but deciding on the subject I wanted to teach has went from Physics to History to Medicine. I also have a love of language. And recently I decided I wanted to learn Italian. As I was looking for the edition of the Divine Comedy I wanted to buy, it hit me like a ton of bricks. I have been fretting and struggling and freaking out trying to decide what I wanted to major in and later teach when my passion has always been literature and history. It was right there and I was just to close to see what was right in front of my eyes. Some of the most obvious things seem to be the hardest to realize. So thanks to this man who lived over 600 years ago I finally found my calling. I want to major in Literature, particularly European, and minor in Italian. I don't know why I never thought of it.

So let's discuss Dante's Divina Commedia.
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  #2  
Old 04-27-2009, 01:12 PM
I've never read it, but with the exception of Paradise Lost it's probably the most referenced work I've ever seen, in poetry at least.
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  #3  
Old 04-27-2009, 01:32 PM
I'm remember reading "The Divine Comedy" when I was like 17 out of choice, without any sort of teacher to guide me through it. You might guess that I had no effing clue as to what was going on. I had zero experience with poetry (let alone epic poetry) but I remember very much enjoying the passages.

And that anecdote is just about all I can really add to your thread. I aplogize.

Awaaaaay!
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  #4  
Old 04-27-2009, 07:12 PM
Che cosa parla italiano bellissimo?
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  #5  
Old 04-27-2009, 07:29 PM
I was given a beautiful copy of 'The Divine Comedy' as a gift and it took me three fucking weeks to get through it with all the foot-notes and references I had to look up.

Worth every second. Which is your favourite canto?
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  #6  
Old 04-28-2009, 12:31 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reigh Kaufman View Post
I was given a beautiful copy of 'The Divine Comedy' as a gift and it took me three fucking weeks to get through it with all the foot-notes and references I had to look up.

Worth every second. Which is your favourite canto?
I'm only to the 5th, but I really like canto 3. There is somethign chilling about it. The words inscribed on the gate, and especialy the boatman. The imagery described is wonderful.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Lyrik View Post
Che cosa parla italiano bellissimo?
Sorry, I don't know any Italian yet. Could you translate?
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  #7  
Old 05-01-2009, 10:03 PM
Nah, I was just seeing if you spoke any.

Strange, Dante was mentioned just yesterday in my Italian class.
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  #8  
Old 05-07-2009, 01:08 AM
I am on Canto 14 of Inferno, and so far Canto 13 is one of my favorites. The description of the forest and the souls dwelling in it are chilling. And then the hell hounds chasing the two souls is...well...frightening to say the least. Dante's ability to be so subtle and simplistic but still be able to convey such imagery and emotion is astounding. He truly was one of the great writers.
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  #9  
Old 06-15-2009, 02:51 AM
If you're not to the Malbolge yet then you haven't even seen the tip of the iceberg in terms of what Dante can do with language. Who did the translation you're reading? Is it in prose or verse? I have the John Ciardi version of the entire comedy, and he's good about providing illuminating but easy and accesible notation and introspection of individual cantos.
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