#1  
Old 03-07-2010, 01:39 AM
Movies That Make GREAT Use Of Slow-Motion?

Let's talk about s.l.o.w - m.o.t.i.o.n in the movies, and what are some examples of this technique?

Also, what movies over use it, and what movies could do with some slo-mo shit? I like slo-mo in some shots.

Here's a couple to get us started:

300 - effective, but over used I think. Still cool though. 25% of this movie is in slo-mo
Zombieland - very cool and funny. Extra slo-mo shots within (mainly in titles). Good
Cyborg - ok movie. And a few slo-mo shots here and there. Not bad.

What are some more?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-07-2010, 01:50 AM
I hate the slow motion in 300. It's a big part of the reason why I think the movie kind of blows.


Slow motion is rarely ever done well. But one movie that comes to mind where it is done VERY effectively is in V for Vendetta.

Wanted also has some cool use of slow motion. Especially the ending.

And The Matrix Reloaded too.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-07-2010, 02:11 AM
i think zach snyder in particular and zombieland use slow motion in a kind of obvious and uninteresting way- a very commercial way. They have the sensibility where things that blow up, fly across the room, get cut in half, spray across the screen, etc. will obviously look cool if in slow motion.

my problem is that it's too precious. too cute. too obvious. a film that uses the technique of shooting at speeds above 24 frames per second in an incredibly interesting way is Scorsese's Raging Bull.

the slow motion in that picture is never what you'd expect. All the action scenes in the ring are regular 24 frames per second, sometimes even faster; 12 frames per second. Whats in slow motion are the moments in between. The bloody water cooling his back during time out, the look he has when he steps back from his opponent, his wife shaking hands with and meeting other men. He has his shit figured out in the ring. It's clear to him. Life on the other hand in never in control- he observes other people in his life with suspicion and trepidation- hs brother, his wife. Shooting at even 35 frames per second adds an atmosphere and awkwardness in regular domestic situations he is incapable of blending in with. I think its a marvel use of the technique.

i don't want to entirely write off slo-motion with action though. Two of the great utilizers (though not pioneers) with slow motion in action are Peckinpah and Woo. I think they utilize it with action quite well because they edit it in an organic way- that actually goes against a rationalized chronological order. in one shot Ernest Borgnine or Chow Yun Fat are jumping over a table at 64 frames per second, the next shot- we see a group of killers jump on another table and unload an entire clip on them, the next shot were back on Borgnine or Fat just now landing from their initial jump.

It doesn't chronologically make sense at all, it goes against the logic of time/gravity/etc. BUT it does makes sense rhythmically in the scene, and thats whats beautiful about it. This of course though, has become the norm. It takes quite a gamble to make slow-mo in action interesting again. At least to me.

Last edited by APzombie; 03-07-2010 at 02:25 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03-07-2010, 02:28 AM
Actually I love Snyder's use of slow motion in Watchmen, the beginning when The Comedian is killed. That was a fantastic scene I thought.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 03-07-2010, 02:43 AM
Bloodsport!

Go to the 5:00 minute mark for: "AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHGGGGGG!"
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 03-07-2010, 02:59 AM
Every Snyder movie.

Antichrist.

Reservoir Dogs.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 03-07-2010, 03:11 AM
For what it tries to accomplish, I think it was done very well in 300 and Watchmen, with only a few eye rolling moments.

Martin Scorsese movies tend to use slow mo very well, often in subtle but important ways. The shot in Goodfellas when De Niro smokes the cigarette and decides to wack Maury for one
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 03-07-2010, 03:11 AM
Obviously Sam Peckinpah owns slow motion.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 03-07-2010, 03:30 AM
this scene from Dazed and Confused

http://www.youtube.com/v/LknJI5bIf6c?hl=en_US&fs=1

Last edited by eiker_ir; 03-07-2010 at 02:00 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 03-07-2010, 06:23 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Badbird View Post
Bloodsport!

Go to the 5:00 minute mark for: "AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHGGGGGG!"
I love that part. And the score is great too. Note a young Forrest Whitaker in the audience.

Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 03-07-2010, 09:53 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by eiker_ir View Post
thie scene from Dazed and Confused

http://www.youtube.com/v/LknJI5bIf6c?hl=en_US&fs=1
YES.

Also: Stanley Kubrick, anyone? 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork Orange... is there any film that uses slow-motion better than these two? Wes Anderson as well. I love the slo-mo in his films, and it's become somewhat of a trademark. The Royal Tenenbaums in particular has a great example.

I also love the use of slo-mo in the shot in Almost Famous, when William Miller is sitting on the bed and the "band-aids" are all jumping around him on the bed, threatening to "de-flower" him, but all he can see through the scarfs and glitter is Penny Lane, standing in the doorway and giving him a loving smile. Great stuff.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 03-07-2010, 01:08 PM
My thing with Zack Snyder is that I felt he used it greatly in Watchmen. Certain scenes like the Comedian's murder and Dr. Manhatten's origin sequence were excellent uses of it. With that said, when I watched 300 recently, it felt overused and tiring. I thought he kept his use of the slo-mo more a little more restrained in Watchmen.

Scorsese is near perfect with it though. AP cited Raging Bull and that's a perfect example. The way he ramps up and slows down the speeds during the boxing matches help communicate the brutality and pain of the match. Scorsese also utilized it pretty well in Taxi Driver in the final shootout, slowing down little moments such as when a man Travis had previously shot crawls up yelling "I'll kill you" repeatedly then speeding it up when the next man emerges.

Last edited by drc5145; 03-07-2010 at 01:11 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 03-07-2010, 05:15 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Badbird View Post
Bloodsport!

Go to the 5:00 minute mark for: "AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHGGGGGG!"
Ahaha Yes! Me and my friends always mock that scene.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 03-07-2010, 05:44 PM
Empire Strikes Back.. in the dark side cave.


Just kidding! It's wierd and totally out of place.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 03-07-2010, 07:55 PM
Hard Target has a really kick ass slow motion sequence, in which Lance Henrickson is making Yancy Butler load his gun with a bullet, pushes her a side and while he's raising his hand up, Van Damme is running towards him and kicks him. This all happens in slow motion and it's freaking awesome!
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 03-07-2010, 08:29 PM
So the obvious master of slow mo is Sam Peckinpah as previously mentioned, but the other great one is anything by John Woo.


Also the stairway scene in The Untouchables is ace as well.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 03-08-2010, 12:32 AM
The Hurt Locker
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 03-08-2010, 01:03 AM
The Six Million Dollar Man (1970s TV Show)

That slow motion with the strange metal sound is the greatest one-two punch in TV/film history!
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 03-08-2010, 07:22 AM
Some awesome slo-mo stuff posted in here.

Also, what about Bladerunner
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 03-08-2010, 08:26 AM
John Woo may over utilize it but A Better Tomorrow's trenchcoat slo-mo is an incredible scene.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 03-08-2010, 01:04 PM
I thought the slow motion scene in the Hangover was brilliant. Right before the kid tazed Zack Galifiankis they went to slow mo as he stared him down. I thought it was one of the funniest parts of the movie. You don't see comedies using slow-mo very often, it's more of an action movie staple.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 03-08-2010, 03:14 PM
Requiem for a Dream had some brilliant uses of slom-mo.. or whatever the hell that was.
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 03-09-2010, 04:26 PM

You guys! So much more out there ! My three favorites:

- The opening credits scene or 'Reservoir Dogs'. The combination of that song, the group walking together and the slo-mo.. One of the best scenes ever.

- The opening scene of "Goldeneye', the bungee jump from the dam. I can watch that scene over and over and over again.

- The staircase scene at the train station in 'The Untouchables'. I have painstakingly dissected that scene to come up with a flaw, but there is none. DePalma is The Master.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 03-09-2010, 05:25 PM
also, someone who has acquired a very interesting use of it in the past decade is Gus Van Sant. His use of 64 frames and even 120 frames in Elephant, Paranoid Park and Milk were utilized in a very melodic and beautiful way.
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 03-09-2010, 05:28 PM
Thriller: A Cruel Picture
Reply With Quote
  #26  
Old 03-09-2010, 05:35 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brendan M. View Post
Thriller: A Cruel Picture
great call! the scene at the warehouse seemed like such a risk i love that they pulled it off
Reply With Quote
  #27  
Old 03-09-2010, 05:40 PM
The revenge scene in Braveheart, great use of slow motion & sfx
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump