#1  
Old 03-20-2003, 04:10 PM
Any Richard Laymon fans?

I'm not a Richard Laymon fan, but I want to be. I'm part of a horror book club, so I own number of his books. Any advice what my first choice ought to be?

The Stake
One Rainy Night
The Traveling Vampire Show
Bite
Among the Missing
Island
Darkness, Tell Us
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  #2  
Old 03-20-2003, 04:41 PM
Yes I am! Unfortunately for me it wasn't until after I read a few of his books, loved them and went to look for some more that I found out he died.

I started out with One Rainy Night which is short on plot but long on just about everything else: violence, sex, murder, mayhem, etc. This book got me hooked.

From there I read In the Dark, Among the Missing, and Island. All of them are pretty good.

I really want to read Darkness, Tell Us. I'll have to go looking for it.

Anyway, I'd say start out with One Rainy Night and go from there.
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  #3  
Old 03-20-2003, 05:01 PM
Cool. Thanks. "One Rainy Night" is the book that caught my attention the most.
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  #4  
Old 03-22-2003, 12:01 PM
Richard Laymon

I was very pleased to see this thread! I've been a fan of Richard Laymon's work since I was 12 or 13. My first laymon was FLESH and I was hooked after that. I remember buying Laymon books and sneaking them home because I didn't think my parents would approve. I used to lend them to friends in school too, and they also had to smuggle them home!

ONE RAINY NIGHT is one of my least favourite Laymon's. I never finished it. My recommendations would be THE STAKE and ISLAND. Then TRAVELLING VAMPIRE SHOW and BODY RIDES. Those are four of my favourites.

I was lucky enough to know Richard Laymon when he was alive. I started emailing him back in 1996 and we became friends then. And when I started going to horror conventions I would always meet up with him and he was very friendly, funny and a lot of fun. In fact, at my first World Horror Convention, he was the ONLY person I knew and he introduced me to a lot of people who became very good friends of mine.
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  #5  
Old 03-22-2003, 01:01 PM
Website

Have you ever been to the Richard Laymon Kills website? If you're a Laymon fan then I highly recommend it!

The URL is rlk.cjb.net

It's an excellent site with interviews and reviews and news - and it's got a great message board section where you can talk about books or music or movies or anything else with other Laymon fans.

I don't have anything to do with the site, by the way. I just discovered it a few years ago and I post on the message board regularly.
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  #6  
Old 03-22-2003, 01:59 PM
I've been a Laymon fan for a number of years now. The first book I read by him was Funland, which I still think is one of his best. I followed this up with Flesh, The Beast House, The Cellar The Stake and Resurrection Drreams.

Since then I've read probably about 75% of his work, and always find his books to be fairly quick, but very entertaining reads. Quake stands out as on e of his finer books, but all of the one's I've read have entertained me!

If you're a fan of King's more horrific work, then you'll love Laymon.
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  #7  
Old 03-22-2003, 02:15 PM
Re: Richard Laymon

Quote:
Originally posted by EoghainFOKeeffe

I was lucky enough to know Richard Laymon when he was alive. I started emailing him back in 1996 and we became friends then. And when I started going to horror conventions I would always meet up with him and he was very friendly, funny and a lot of fun. In fact, at my first World Horror Convention, he was the ONLY person I knew and he introduced me to a lot of people who became very good friends of mine.
That's cool. I've heard similar things about Laymon's outgoing personality and friendliness.
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  #8  
Old 03-22-2003, 05:07 PM
IN THE DARK

Night Watchman - after you read Laymon's IN THE DARK you might want to check out the movie version that's doing the rounds of horror conventions and film festivals at the moment. It's creepy as hell.
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  #9  
Old 03-23-2003, 05:09 AM
Leisure

Night Watchman - the horror book club that you mentioned in your first post...is it Leisure? Apparently some of Laymon's british editions have been edited in some way - to remove some of the more offensive parts. So this means that some of his books are even MORE offensive than the editions I've been reading. Which is very good news indeed! Even better news is that, from now on, Leisure will be publishing his books uncut, direct from the original manuscripts.
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  #10  
Old 03-24-2003, 01:30 PM
I just picked up Darkness, Tell Us over the weekend. I'm about 75 pages in and it's pretty good so far.
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  #11  
Old 03-24-2003, 01:48 PM
Re: Leisure

Quote:
Originally posted by EoghainFOKeeffe
Night Watchman - the horror book club that you mentioned in your first post...is it Leisure? Apparently some of Laymon's british editions have been edited in some way - to remove some of the more offensive parts. So this means that some of his books are even MORE offensive than the editions I've been reading. Which is very good news indeed! Even better news is that, from now on, Leisure will be publishing his books uncut, direct from the original manuscripts.
Yes, it's Leisure. Hooray for offensive literature!
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  #12  
Old 03-24-2003, 02:39 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by RogueSpear
I just picked up Darkness, Tell Us over the weekend. I'm about 75 pages in and it's pretty good so far.
I remember reading DARKNESS TELL US in math class when I was in high school. A friend of mine, at the other side of the room, was also reading it. At some point during the class I heard my friend say in a VERY loud whisper, 'Eoghain! It's asking them to take their TOPS off!'
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  #13  
Old 10-27-2003, 05:03 PM
I just thought I'd bump this up to see if anyone was interested in talking more Laymon.

I just bought a new Laymon book yesterday, Blood Games and I must say it has the best premise of any of his works yet.

Friends since college, five mid-20's females go to a rundown, abandoned, and secluded lodge which harbors and dark and disturbing past. Once arriving they realize they aren't alone. Sounds great.
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  #14  
Old 11-10-2003, 12:50 PM
Yes...BLOOD GAMES is superb. It was also a bit of a landmark in Laymon's career because it was his first really lengthy book with extra character development. Before that point, his books were mostly 'short sharp shocks' filled with great chases and creepy scenes.

Not to say his earlier fiction was inferior - but he changed his style significantly after BLOOD GAMES.
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  #15  
Old 11-10-2003, 01:15 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by EoghainFOKeeffe
Yes...BLOOD GAMES is superb. It was also a bit of a landmark in Laymon's career because it was his first really lengthy book with extra character development. Before that point, his books were mostly 'short sharp shocks' filled with great chases and creepy scenes.

Not to say his earlier fiction was inferior - but he changed his style significantly after BLOOD GAMES.
I just finished it and yes it was very good. The characters were all well written and the I loved the flashbacks to the girls past adventures. My only problem was the ending, which I thought didn't keep up with the rest of the story. All in all, a very good read.
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  #16  
Old 01-20-2004, 12:18 PM
I'm halfway through the first of the Beast House Trilogy books...The Cellar. So far I like it a lot. I found a couple of the scenes with Roy majorly discomfiting and almost put the book down a couple of times. There's a fine line between depicting acts of child abuse and murder as the deplorable and deeply evil acts they are and depicting them in a disturbingly lurid fashion. I think Laymon crosses that line a couple of times in this book. Certain scenes are depicted a little too gleefully. That said...this is after all a Laymon book so sex and violence comes with the territory and taboo doesn't seem to be a word he understood. At the halfway point it's obvious where the story is heading. I imagine that Roy is going to get his before the end at the hands of the beast. I hope he gets it real bad...he's one of the most reprehensible characters i've ever had the (dis)pleasure of reading.

I have a question for Laymon fans who have read the entire trilogy. How does The Cellar compare to the later books? How would you rank them in order of preference? I'm enjoying this a great deal so if The Beast House and The Midnight Show are better then i'm likely going to plough right into the second and third book in quick succession after I finish up with The Cellar. Any help appreciated.

Last edited by Psychocandy; 01-20-2004 at 12:21 PM..
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  #17  
Old 01-20-2004, 05:57 PM
I've read all three Beast house books, and I think it's fair to say that if you like one of 'em you'll like 'em all! I mean this in a positive way, but they're all very similar in tone and content. Enjoy!
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  #18  
Old 01-21-2004, 06:42 AM
Fettdog is right, to an extent. If you like THE CELLAR, you'll like the next three books. But i disagree with him about the books being of equal quality.

THE CELLAR is a very short book and I enjoyed it a lot (apart from the bits that Psychocandy mentioned, where a certain line is crossed that Laymon didn't, to my knowledge, ever cross again in his fiction) but I didn't find it entirely satisfying. THE BEAST HOUSE is better than THE CELLAR.

But the best of all the books is THE MIDNIGHT TOUR - I absolutely loved this book. It's like a lurid, sexy, violent Robert Altman story - with lots of subplots that intertwine and influence each other. It's a very clever and well-written horror book.

The fourth book, FRIDAY NIGHT IN BEAST HOUSE, is really just a novella and it is an entirely different story, that just happens to be set in the Beast House 'universe.' I really enjoyed it, though.
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  #19  
Old 01-21-2004, 12:36 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by EoghainFOKeeffe
Fettdog is right, to an extent. If you like THE CELLAR, you'll like the next three books. But i disagree with him about the books being of equal quality.
You're probably right - it's literally years since I read them so I'm probably getting them mixed up in my mind

Quote:
The fourth book, FRIDAY NIGHT IN BEAST HOUSE, is really just a novella and it is an entirely different story, that just happens to be set in the Beast House 'universe.' I really enjoyed it, though.
I wasn't aware there was a fourth book! I'll have to track it down and give it a go.
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  #20  
Old 01-22-2004, 02:37 PM
So I finished The Cellar. Hmph!!! The ending was simply one the most blatent examples of "will this do?" style writing I think i've ever read. I did enjoy the book but in the end Laymon killed off a main character with a shrug then in the epilogue had the two remaining characters acting so out of character it was beyond ridiculous. In fact that entire epilogue was pathetic. Please tell me that the remaining two books have better realised endings as I really enjoyed this novel until the end. I think that it's likely Laymon saw Walerian Borowczyk's "La Bete" at some point.
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  #21  
Old 01-23-2004, 09:39 AM
Of the four books, my favourite is THE MIDNIGHT TOUR, then THE BEAST HOUSE, then FRIDAY NIGHT AT BEAST HOUSE and then THE CELLAR. If you found the end of THE CELLAR disappointing, don't worry - the end of MIDNIGHT TOUR is great! I can't remember the end of THE BEAST HOUSE, though - it's been a long time since I read it.
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  #22  
Old 02-10-2004, 11:56 AM
out of all his books i've enjoyed In the Dark the most! Body Rides was pretty fantastic too
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  #23  
Old 03-04-2004, 11:25 AM
I love Richard Laymon's books. The first one I ever read was The Stake, which my dad bought me when I was only about 13! Suffice to say, I didn't really "get" what was happening until I re-read it much later. But from then on I was hooked. I have nearly all of his books - an entire bookshelf devoted to them.

As for the Beast House trilogy, I agree that The Cellar was just too icky. I just couldn't enjoy it. I really liked The Beast House, the second book, but I thought The Midnight Tour was rubbish (sorry). The plot meandered and no real beast action happened until the end.

I'd recommend Savage, which is his version of the Jack The Ripper tale. Excellent book. Other good ones are Among The Missing and especially Dark Mountain.

And you say there's a film version of In The Dark? How and when did this come about? I'd love to see it!
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  #24  
Old 05-10-2004, 10:03 PM
I just read THE BODY RIDE. It was great writing but I wasnt too impressed. Thought there was uncessary filler in there and a bit more could have been done. Then again there were great methods he used to. I'll definitely be giving him more chances. Unique idea at least
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  #25  
Old 05-11-2004, 01:41 AM
laymon rocks!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
my favorites are one rainy night, bite, the stake and among the missing. his books are very suspenseful and full of scares.

ciao
drdash
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  #26  
Old 05-11-2004, 03:55 AM
I skipped most of this thread because I'm tired and don't want to read it all. I would definately read The Traveling Vampire Show because it won a Bram Stoker award.
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  #27  
Old 05-11-2004, 11:54 AM
Meh. laymon has always bored the shite out of me. His books never really had enough in them to make me sit up and want to read them...I've read a few, but I really don't think they are all that good.
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  #28  
Old 05-12-2004, 08:26 AM
Quoth_the_raven;

did you ever give NIGHT IN THE LONESOME OCTOBER or TRAVELLING VAMPIRE SHOW a go? I thought they were excelleng coming-of-age tales with a lot of character depth and great prose. Laymon's earlier books placed a lot of emphasis on fast-moving action and frequent shocks - which I love, but may not be to everyone's taste. His more recent books are much deeper.
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  #29  
Old 05-12-2004, 11:23 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by EoghainFOKeeffe
Quoth_the_raven;

did you ever give NIGHT IN THE LONESOME OCTOBER or TRAVELLING VAMPIRE SHOW a go? I thought they were excelleng coming-of-age tales with a lot of character depth and great prose. Laymon's earlier books placed a lot of emphasis on fast-moving action and frequent shocks - which I love, but may not be to everyone's taste. His more recent books are much deeper.


I dont think i did. I had my shot at laymon quite a while ago now. i will look those up next time i have a minute.
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  #30  
Old 11-12-2007, 11:45 PM
funland is fanastic.group of teens going TROLLING on bums only for the tables of course to turn on them.the last 100 hundred pages zip along at a great pace and the ending has a nice ironic twist.
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  #31  
Old 11-13-2007, 01:43 AM
A bunch of names I haven't seen in a long long time... I love thread revivals. I wonder what happened to some of these schmoes.


Oh and I'm sure Richard Laymon is awesome... Maybe I'll check out funland.
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  #32  
Old 11-08-2010, 06:18 PM

Ah i Love Laymon's books! best is Savage, Beast house and the cellar.

Ive heard IN THE DARK has been made into a movie??? anyone know where i can get it?
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