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  #1  
Old 06-18-2011, 01:18 AM
LulzSec to continue ‘causing mayhem and chaos throughout the Internet'

LulzSec manifesto promises to continue ‘causing mayhem and chaos throughout the Internet’

Quote:
WASHINGTON — Computer hackers who have hit the websites of the CIA, US Senate, Sony and others during a month-long rampage said Friday that they were staging the attacks for their own entertainment.

"You find it funny to watch havoc unfold, and we find it funny to cause it," the hacker group known as Lulz Security said in a 750-word online "manifesto."

"For the past month and a bit, we've been causing mayhem and chaos throughout the Internet, attacking several targets including PBS, Sony, Fox, porn websites, FBI, CIA, the US government, Sony some more, online gaming servers," Lulz said.

"While we've gained many, many supporters, we do have a mass of enemies, albeit mainly gamers," Lulz said, adding that they were not concerned.

"This is the lulz lizard era, where we do things just because we find it entertaining," said Lulz, whose name is a derivative of the text shorthand for LOL, or "laugh out loud."

"This is the Internet, where we screw each other over for a jolt of satisfaction," the group said.

"We release personal data so that equally evil people can entertain us with what they do with it," Lulz said. "And that's all there is to it, that's what appeals to our Internet generation.

"We're attracted to fast-changing scenarios, we can't stand repetitiveness, and we want our shot of entertainment or we just go and browse something else, like an unimpressed zombie," Lulz said.

The group said it will "continue creating things that are exciting and new until we're brought to justice, which we might well be."

Lulz has released tens of thousands of user names and passwords in recent weeks but the group said Friday they were "sitting on" the personal information of 200,000 users of the Brink videogame.

"It might make you feel safe knowing we told you, so that Brink users may change their passwords," Lulz said.

On Wednesday, Lulz knocked the CIA's public website, cia.gov, out of commission for about two hours.

Lulz, in a message on their Twitter feed @LulzSec on Friday, also denied reports that they were in conflict with the hacker group Anonymous, from which Lulz is believed to have formed.

"To confirm, we aren't going after Anonymous," Lulz said.

Anonymous has been staging cyberattacks for years on companies cracking down on music and movie piracy and gained notoriety last year with cyberattacks in support of controversial website WikiLeaks.
Recent reports confirm initial speculation they are doing it "for the lulz."
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  #2  
Old 06-18-2011, 03:37 AM
Any evidence of profiteering or is it genuinely for the lulz?
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  #3  
Old 06-18-2011, 12:15 PM
It would be more comforting knowing they are in it for the money, to be doing for the 'lulz' is pathetic. I hope the cops find these guys and skin them alive, it's nothing short of what they deserve.
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  #4  
Old 06-18-2011, 01:58 PM
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  #5  
Old 06-18-2011, 08:47 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heisenberg View Post
It would be more comforting knowing they are in it for the money, to be doing for the 'lulz' is pathetic. I hope the cops find these guys and skin them alive, it's nothing short of what they deserve.
really? I did a bit of research and from what I saw Lulzsec pranked a number of sites, but really what they are doing is exposing security flaws in websites by hacking them and posting up the information they take to prove it. Lulzsec even once denied 10,000 dollars and a job offer from Black and Berg Cybersecurity for successfully hacking their network, saying they only do it for the lulz. So i don't believe the group to be malicious in any way, most hackers would use the information they take and try to use credit card numbers and other personal data to make money, these guys are just doing it for fun.
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  #6  
Old 06-19-2011, 11:10 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Criminal Rock View Post
really? I did a bit of research and from what I saw Lulzsec pranked a number of sites, but really what they are doing is exposing security flaws in websites by hacking them and posting up the information they take to prove it. Lulzsec even once denied 10,000 dollars and a job offer from Black and Berg Cybersecurity for successfully hacking their network, saying they only do it for the lulz. So i don't believe the group to be malicious in any way, most hackers would use the information they take and try to use credit card numbers and other personal data to make money, these guys are just doing it for fun.
Sounds a bit like a David Fincher movie.
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  #7  
Old 06-19-2011, 11:48 AM
I think its sort of silly seeing as some of their demands so far. I read an article where they hack Bethesda a little while back. Their reason for it apparently is that they wanted more info on Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim and wanted a Lulz tophat added to the games inventory or they would release a bunch of personal data, none of which was financial in nature.

I mean really ppl, really?
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  #8  
Old 06-19-2011, 11:52 AM
Looks like a couple fuckers have seen The Dark Knight a few too many times.

If only they could put their skills to better use....
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  #9  
Old 06-19-2011, 07:20 PM
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  #10  
Old 06-19-2011, 11:02 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smiert Spionam View Post
Looks like a couple fuckers have seen The Dark Knight a few too many times.

If only they could put their skills to better use....
But could one not contend that they have? That, as many in the white hat community actually seem to feel, they've raised critical awareness about the blatant and fundamental lack of cybersecurity at the highest levels of web-based infrastructure -- at the U.S. Senate, at Sony, at the three-letter agencies, at major corporate service-providers, etc.
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  #11  
Old 06-21-2011, 01:36 PM
(from the Financial Times)
Quote:
UK police arrest teen over website attacks

By Simon Mundy in London and Joseph Menn in San Francisco

Published: June 21 2011 16:09 | Last updated: June 21 2011 17:56

British police have arrested a suspected computer hacker in connection with a slew of online security assaults, including attacks on the websites of the UK’s Serious Organised Crime Agency and the CIA.

The 19-year-old man, named by private security experts helping the authorities as Ryan Cleary, was arrested in Wickford, 55km north-east of London, on Monday night, as part of a joint operation with the US Federal Bureau of Investigation, Scotland Yard said.

“The arrest follows an investigation into network intrusions and distributed denial of service [DDoS] attacks against a number of international business and intelligence agencies by what is believed to be the same hacking group,” it said.

The arrest came after a DDoS attack forced Soca to take down its website on Monday. Such attacks cripple websites by overloading them with traffic, and have been compared by hackers to peaceful “sit-in” protests.

Responsibility for the incident was claimed by LulzSec, a hacker group that called DDoS its “least powerful and most abundant ammunition” that was formed after a split in the group Anonymous, which attacked organisations that co-operated with a US crackdown on Wikileaks, the whistle-blowing website, last year.

Other recent attacks claimed by LulzSec include those on the CIA public website and Sony servers.

All three attacks are being investigated as part of the operation that led to the arrest, a Scotland Yard spokesman said.

Private security experts assisting the FBI on the case identified the suspect as Mr Cleary, whose details were published last month on a site run by Anonymous. A blog post accused Mr Cleary of organising a “coup d’état” against Anonymous, in protest against its “leaderless command structure”.

LulzSec said this week that the two organisations had joined forces for a new campaign, Antisec, which would steal and leak information from governments, banks, and “other high-ranking establishments”.

On Tuesday, LulzSec mocked the idea that Mr Cleary was the organisation’s “mastermind”.

“Seems the glorious leader of LulzSec got arrested, it’s all over now . . . wait . . . we’re all still here!” it wrote on Twitter.

A leading figure in the organisation, known as Sabu, also wrote on Twitter that Mr Cleary had “little to do with LulzSec” besides running a chat channel.

The security researchers admitted that Mr Cleary’s role in LulzSec was unclear. However, he was likely to have valuable information about other members, they added.

Graham Cluley, a technology consultant at the computer security company Sophos, said that LulzSec had been “playing a dangerous game”. “Their Twitter account, which has more than 220,000 followers, has become increasingly vocal – embarrassing computer crime authorities and large organisations throughout the world with their attacks,” he said.

“There has been much speculation recently regarding who might be behind LulzSec – if the group has now been cracked, then it will send a strong message to others thinking about engaging in their own hacks or denial-of-service attacks,” he added.
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  #12  
Old 06-21-2011, 05:32 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lulzsec
Greetings Internets,

We Have Blissfully obtained records of every single citizen who gave their records to the security-illiterate UK government for the 2011 census

We’re keeping them under lock and key though… so don’t worry about your privacy (…until we finish re-formatting them for release)

Myself and the rest of my Lulz shipmates will then embark upon a trip to ThePirateBay with our beautiful records for your viewing pleasure!

Ahoy! Bwahahaha… >:]

Cap’n Pierre “Lulz” Dubois
I wonder how much information they'll edit out..
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  #13  
Old 06-27-2011, 12:34 PM
Quote:
LulzSec disbands following Battlefield Heroes breach

By Tor Thorsen, GameSpot Posted Jun 27, 2011 9:43 am PT

Hacker group releases 500,000 user names from EA's free-to-play shooter before declaring its 50-day virtual rampage over.

The past month has seen the hacker group Lulz Security (aka LulzSec) attack a variety of game companies, including Nintendo, Bethesda Softworks, Epic Games, CCP Games, and Mojang. Now, the group has announced its 50-day virtual rampage has come to a close, and that the organization itself has disbanded.

Hacker group LulzSec has apparently disbanded after 50 days of attacks.

"We are Lulz Security, and this is our final release, as today marks something meaningful to us," the group--which also calls itself the Lulz Boat--said in a statement. "For the past 50 days we've been disrupting and exposing corporations, governments, often the general population itself, and quite possibly everything in between, just because we could. All to selflessly entertain others--vanity, fame, recognition, all of these things are shadowed by our desire for that which we all love."

The statement concluded, "So with those last thoughts, it's time to say bon voyage. Our planned 50 day cruise has expired, and we must now sail into the distance, leaving behind--we hope--inspiration, fear, denial, happiness, approval, disapproval, mockery, embarrassment, thoughtfulness, jealousy, hate, even love. If anything, we hope we had a microscopic impact on someone, somewhere. Anywhere."

That said, LulzSec fired a parting salvo by hacking the site for Electronic Arts' free-to-play shooter Battlefield Heroes. The group released some 500,000 accounts with username and password combinations from the beta for the Digital Illusions CE-developed game, as well as bringing down the game's site.

In a brief statement on the official Battlefield Heroes website, EA confirmed a "security breach" by an unnamed party. However, it said that "to the best of our knowledge, it appears that no personal data was compromised--no emails, account history, credit card numbers or payment methods."

LulzSec's announcement comes a week after a 19-year-old Briton was arrested on suspicion of being part of the group. However, LulzSec used its Twitter account to deny any connection to the man.
Source

Srsly these guys just need to fuck off now
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  #14  
Old 06-27-2011, 01:47 PM
Hope these geeks get sent to a Federal prison and get raped hourly.
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