#81  
Old 10-13-2012, 12:29 PM
#11: Hellraiser: Hellseeker



The familiar face you'll see of the dude on the Allstate insurance commercials was actually the main character here, and he has basically the same expression for every emotion, at some point it becomes bothersome yet funny at the same time. Besides the cringeworthy opening brain 'surgery' scene - it's just empty and uninteresting throughout.

3/10

#12: Yokai Monsters: 100 Monsters



Skimmed through out, too much talk and none of it is interesting. The image above is one of the few more interesting moments of it. Too bad they were too few and in between.

3/10
Reply With Quote
  #82  
Old 10-14-2012, 07:22 PM
From day 10 to day 14 . . .

11) Children of The Corn IV: The Gathering (1996) - What is Naomi Watts doing in this mediocre sequel? Oh, right, she wasn't famous yet. Had to pay the bills. And so did Karen Black, perhaps best known for "Airport 1975." This is the first entry in the series to exhaust me. As it should, it tries something a little different but is less successful. As always, another child leader possessed by the corn emerges. The local children become sick and then act as reincarnated souls of former children. This development is new to the series but not exciting in itself. Nice try. Watts is a doctor who comes back home to see her mother and take care of the sick children. She puts on a brave face and does her best with the material.

12) Leatherface: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre III (1989) - According to Doug Bradley's book and Gunnar Hansen himself, the original movie was originally titled "Leatherface." Its official title was meant to create a sensation and cause a stir. And boy, did it ever. This second sequel is the best and only decent entry to follow the original. If the original was suspenseful and scary, then this is a badass and intense "Chainsaw" film if there ever was one.

13) Night Warning (1982) - As covered at my Video Store. A creepy and suspenseful domestic horror film.

14) Sinister (2012) - This new theatrical movie seems to be recieving mixed reviews from critics and fans. I liked it. It was very disturbing. My nerves are shot by now. Have seen too many movies. Nothing is scary anymore, but it is always possible for newer movies to come up with fresh disturbing content to surprise experienced fans. This one did.

15) Pin (1989) - As covered at my Video Store. A creepy and very effective psychological horror film.

So far, 15 for 14.
Reply With Quote
  #83  
Old 10-14-2012, 11:06 PM
#13: Road Games



Wasn't as mindblowing as its fellow brother Long Weekend, but I liked it. Quite decent. Funny part is that they have TWO american actors in an aussie film yet there's virtually NO background information or acknowledgement of them being americans in australia. Lol, that's when you know you're watching exploitiation. They're just there, it's all part of the schtick.

7/10
Reply With Quote
  #84  
Old 10-15-2012, 12:13 AM
#14: Urban Legends: Final Cut



First vieweing. I remember catching a glimpse of this on TV almost a decade ago but only now got to watching this one. Obviously by now a tired formula, but they tried to give it a different spin by setting it in a film school environment. You can literally make a new slasher forever. The formula may be tired but the settings and motivations of "the killer" can be endless. Overall I liked the new spin, but it's still only ok. Also it's obvious this has nothing to do with the original besides the title. They just tried to cash in on whatever success of the first film, but there's ZERO relationship or continuity

6/10
Reply With Quote
  #85  
Old 10-17-2012, 10:15 PM
The Fly Mini-Marathon!



#13) The Fly (1958) (Oct 13)

"You're in an unscientific mood."

Never having seen the original The Fly and wanting to rewatch Cronenberg's version, I decided to make a mini-marathon out of it.

I was actually pretty surprised by this, it's more sophisticated than I had expected.

The movie is book-ended buy the murder investigation of Vincent Price's character's brother, Andre Delambre. Admitting to the murder, Andre's wife Helene tells the strange events that led to the grisly discovery of Andre's head and arm crushed in a hydraulic press.

The mystery of it is actually pretty interesting. I imagine it must have been pretty impressive if you managed to somehow get into the theater without knowing anything about it - which I'm sure was much easier to do back in 1958.

Unfortunately, the bulk of the story is told in the flashback to the experiment and death of Andre from the point of view of Helene - played by Patricia Owens who's performance simply does not hold up. While I thought the male cast was fine, Owens still has that classical acting style about her, often speaking much faster and LOUDER than necessary, looking around at nothing in particular or just plain hamming it up for the camera. It feels like a stage play performance shoved into a science fiction mystery. As the real lead character of the movie, it gets a little grating.


That acting!

And finally, I don't want to go into too much detail, but the final scene of the movie also leaves a poor taste and the stink of Studio involvement as they attempt to end it on a happy note - which just falls flat on its face.




#14) The Fly (1986) (Oct 14) (rewatch)

"Oh, are you serious? A monkey just came apart in there."

I don't think I need to go into any detail on this one. It's one of those movies I'd see all the time, piece by piece on TV. I don't know if I've ever actually sat down and watched it from start to finish though, so here we are.

Out of everything I've watched so far for this year's marathon, there's been some really good films, but this is the first I'd consider a true classic. I don't want to throw around the term "masterpiece", but this is damn close.

Man, did Jeff Goldblum kill it in this role. He gave the character of Seth Brundle so much life and personality that really elevates the movie above what it is. He's interesting as hell even before he steps into the pod.

Am I the only one that feels kind of bad for Stathis though? Sure, he was a complete piece of shit for 3/4th of the movie, but I feel he redeems himself by the end.




#15) The Fly II (1989) (Oct 15) (rewatch)

"I had no love for the man. He bugged me."

And then we have the sequel... I had originally seen this when it first hit cable back in the day, so I figured I'd give it another go.

There's not really much to say here. It's a totally unnecessary and forgettable sequel that drags along slowly, but I kind of respect it for trying to keep the plot advancing by continuing on with Seth Brundle's son, Martin. I'm glad they didn't just end up attempting to
Spoiler:
bring Seth back to life.


The practical and makeup effects are actually quite impressive as well. I'm not a huge fan of the design of the final fly creature's face (I wish it was closer to the Seth's fly form) but the various stages of Martin's mutation look great and there's some really gruesome kills in the final act of the movie. The
Spoiler:
face melt
is fucking incredible and it has one of my personal faves,
Spoiler:
a dude getting folded in half, backwards.
I never get tired of seeing that in movies.

The scene with
Spoiler:
Stathis,
is flat out awesome too. Wish it was longer.


Final Viewed List:

#01) The Cabin in the Woods (2012) (Oct 1)
#02) Piranha (1978) (Oct 2)
#03) Piranha DD (2012) (Oct 3)
#04) The Living Dead Girl (aka La morte vivante) (1982) (Oct 4)
#05) Anthropophagus: The Grim Reaper (1980) (Oct 5)
#06) Killer Klowns from Outer Space (1988) (Oct 6) (rewatch)
#07) The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986) (Oct 7) (rewatch)
#08) The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning (2006) (Oct 8) (rewatch)
#09) Motel Hell (1980) (Oct 9)
#10) Deranged (1974) (Oct 10)
#11) The Burning (1981) (Oct 11)
#12) Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982) (Oct 12) (rewatch)
#13) The Fly (1958) (Oct 13)
#14) The Fly (1986) (Oct 14) (rewatch)
#15) The Fly II (1989) (Oct 15) (rewatch)

Last edited by ThirstyFly; 10-17-2012 at 10:28 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #86  
Old 10-17-2012, 11:50 PM
#15: Pumpkinhead



I've always seen bits and pieces of this on TV and found the creature to be absolutely terrifying. From the get go, the atmosphere is unbelievably scary, and throughout the film it's consistent. This is one of the film's strong points. The final showdown is especially a testament to Stan Winston's greatness as a creature FX designer. Very effective, and definitely one of the more serious offerings of horror to come out of the 80's.

7/10
Reply With Quote
  #87  
Old 10-18-2012, 07:05 PM
"The Fly" is amazing. I hated the sequel when I was younger, but learned to appreciate it later on. An underrated effort.

From day 15 to day 18 . . .

16) Frankenstein Meets The Wolf Man (1943) - This oldie die nothing for me. Felt like an uninspired rehash of "The Wolf Man." All set up and far too little payoff. This is a filler movie setting up the events for "House of Frankenstein."

17) House of Frankenstein (1944) - This follow-up was worth the hassle of the previous entry. Boris Karloff plays a mad scientist planning a huge experiment concerning the Frankenstein monster, the wolf man and a hunchback. There is an involving story and a love triangle between the wolf man, the hunchback and a gypsy girl. Dracula even makes a special appearance.

18) Highway to Hell (1992) - As covered at my Video Store. A fun, thrilling and somewhat humorous journey into Hell.

19) House of Dracula (1945) - Both Dracula and the wolf man turn to a doctor to cure them of their monsterish problems. The Frankenstein monster also shows up. A good enough conclusion to the Universal monster movies before the parodies.

But what is it really, a clinic for the monsters? It makes me picture Michael Myers, Jason Voorhees and Freddy Krueger willingly going to an institute. Michael would open up to a psychiatrist about the voice in the back of his mind driving him to kill. Jason would speak to a therapist about growing up with a overprotective lunatic for a mother and somehow being inspired to kill even after her death. And Freddy...he probably wouldn't take it seriously. He would enjoy talking about killing the kids in their dreams and messing around with the doctors. He would go through a handful of doctors and be the one to ruin the treatments for all of them. Meanwhile, Michael and Jason would both lose control and slip from time to time. And at the end, Michael would force himself to channel his good side (as inspired by his psychiatrist) and face off with Jason to stop his rampage. Now, that could be the last movie for all of them! Okay, not really. But I find it humorous to think about.

20) Children of the Corn V: Fields of Terror (1998) - The new element in this one is a silo containing a fire. It is believed be the result of spontaneous combustion and will not go out. But it is really the supernatural force of the cornfield. A group of college kids wind up in the farming community and so on. It's not a bad try. Better than Part IV and almost as enjoyable as Parts II and III. There is a decent effort to make the audience give a damn about the young adult characters. But it is still not very good. There are some surprising stars to be found in this cornfield. My gosh, Eva Mendez had to put up with this and "Urban Legends: Final Cut" to get to where she is now. Unbelievably, kung fu master David Carradine plays a small, thankless part in the cult. And what is Kane Hodder doing in this? Oh, he's not. Whoever that is, he is a ramarkable doppleganger. Or a twin brother Kane had no idea was separated from him in birth.

So far, 20 for 18.

Last edited by Duke Nukem; 10-18-2012 at 07:12 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #88  
Old 10-18-2012, 11:47 PM
#16: She-Beast



An atmospheric opening sequence, and an effective makeup design for a film from the 60's - music as well, however after the opening, the bulk of the film just turns into some parody with stereotypical characters and an uninteresting chain of events that just didn't do anything for me. It gets points for decent cinematography and an effective score. But everything else is nonsense.

4/10
Reply With Quote
  #89  
Old 10-19-2012, 09:29 PM
#17: Nightbreed



Cronenberg playing a bad guy? Barker being screwed by studio interference. Danny Elfman's amazing score. All that aside, this came out to be an ok film. A plot that's not exactly making sense. Thought it IS Barker, so you at least get an interesting concept, and quite imaginative creature design. A blend of fantasy and horror, not sure what it was exactly. A concoction of some kind.

5/10
Reply With Quote
  #90  
Old 10-19-2012, 09:57 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Digifruitella View Post
#17: Nightbreed



Cronenberg playing a bad guy? Barker being screwed by studio interference. Danny Elfman's amazing score. All that aside, this came out to be an ok film. A plot that's not exactly making sense. Thought it IS Barker, so you at least get an interesting concept, and quite imaginative creature design. A blend of fantasy and horror, not sure what it was exactly. A concoction of some kind.

5/10
I loved everything Barker wrote ..... BUT ..... ever since i learned about is deviant gay and druggy life style just made it 10x better .. For shame Stephen King !!!
Reply With Quote
  #91  
Old 10-21-2012, 06:45 AM
The Historically Accurate Triple Feature!



#16) Nazis at the Center of the Earth (2012) (Oct 16)

"Some people say that this is the site of secret submarine bases. Some people say that this is the center of Nazi UFO research..."
"I'm sorry, how do you know all of this?"
"Hah, when you live in Antarctica for 10 years you hear things."


Ah, The Asylum. I'm sure everyone here is familiar with their cheap cash-in "mockbusters", but here's one of their fully original movies (as far as I can tell, anyway).

You should really know what you're getting into when you sit down to watch a movie by The Asylum. It's a micro-budget b-movie with god awful special effects, a bunch of nobody "actors" and one or two D-list celebrities thrown in so they have some names to put on the cover. This time we're treated to Jake Busey and a puffy looking Dominique Swain.

If you're in the mindset to watch a movie of this type, I think it's one of their better ones. The Asylum really reminds me of the early Troma (before they declined into an even lower budget studio focusing mostly on offending and grossing out their audience).

The story is completely absurd, filled with illogical events and over-the-top nonsense, but they take it pretty seriously. There's no winking at the camera (unless you count Busey's hammy performance) and they play it straight even when
Spoiler:
Hitler's re-animated head is walking around fish bowled onto a robot body.
And because of that I think it works. It's not the greatest movie in the world, or even the best Nazi zombie movie, but at least it managed to hold my attention for the runtime, unlike some of the other movies I've watched this marathon.




#17) Abraham Lincoln vs. Zombies (2012) (Oct 17)

(To Theodore Roosevelt) "I'm sorry we don't have a spare weapon for you. Here, as you go, walk softly and carry *this* big stick."

And now we have one of the so-called "mockbusters" that The Asylum is known for, their tie-in to Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter.

This was actually pretty entertaining. Like Nazis at the Center of the Earth, they play things straight and again it works in its favor. But unlike Nazis, this one never goes too over-the-top (aside from the premise of Honest Abe kickin' zombie ass).

Obviously, the story for this was effected by the budget and the real locations they could get so the set pieces never get too crazy and the story is fairly simple. The setting also allows them to keep the poor CG at a minimum. Mostly just the blood and some effects are CG, so we don't have to deal with Asylum's cheap CG backgrounds or CG characters.

I thought it was pretty clever they way they tied it into real history and included a few more historical figures. The guy playing Abe was pretty impressive too. Much better than you'd expect in a movie like this.




#18) Exit Humanity (2011) (Oct 19)

"I have become fury of death killing death. Blood drunk."

Following up on Abraham Lincoln vs. Zombies, Exit Humanity is another low budget zombie epic taking place shortly after the American Civil War.

Exit Humanity differs in that it's a grounded, bleak movie about a man's survival and grief over losing his family to the zombie scourge. There's nothing silly or over-the-top here (with the exception of maybe Bill Moseley's performance).

The low budget is managed quite well with this one, and it never feels like their lack of money was holding it back. It's all shot on locations with a few practical sets there were built (and look fantastic). Zombie makeup starts out pretty basic as mostly just layers and layers of colours are slapped onto people, but as the film progresses and the zombies decay there's more prosthetic makeup added giving them a more professional look. There's even a couple of transition shots done in animated form which was a really smart and stylistic way of saving a few bucks.

I've seen this compared to Stake Land, but I haven't seen that yet. The tone of it really did remind me of The Road so fans of that may want to take a look. Highly recommended.


Final Viewed List:

#01) The Cabin in the Woods (2012) (Oct 1)
#02) Piranha (1978) (Oct 2)
#03) Piranha DD (2012) (Oct 3)
#04) The Living Dead Girl (aka La morte vivante) (1982) (Oct 4)
#05) Anthropophagus: The Grim Reaper (1980) (Oct 5)
#06) Killer Klowns from Outer Space (1988) (Oct 6) (rewatch)
#07) The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986) (Oct 7) (rewatch)
#08) The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning (2006) (Oct 8) (rewatch)
#09) Motel Hell (1980) (Oct 9)
#10) Deranged (1974) (Oct 10)
#11) The Burning (1981) (Oct 11)
#12) Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982) (Oct 12) (rewatch)
#13) The Fly (1958) (Oct 13)
#14) The Fly (1986) (Oct 14) (rewatch)
#15) The Fly II (1989) (Oct 15) (rewatch)
#16) Nazis at the Center of the Earth (2012) (Oct 16)
#17) Abraham Lincoln vs. Zombies (2012) (Oct 17)
#18) Exit Humanity (2011) (Oct 19)

Last edited by ThirstyFly; 10-21-2012 at 06:48 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #92  
Old 10-22-2012, 03:33 PM
The Complete Fright Night Franchise Mini-Marathon



#19) Fright Night (1985) (Oct 20)

"A coffin! That's what's down there, a coffin. I saw them carry it in. Yeah, and you'll find Jerry Dandrige in it, sleeping THE SLEEP OF THE UNDEAD!"

There's plenty of big movies I missed growing up during the 80s that I've slowly been catching up on. Fight Night is one of them and man, did I have a blast with this one. I was giggling through the entire thing. What a great example of 80s horror/comedy.

I'm sure everyone else has seen this, but I have to say how much I enjoyed Chris Sarandon and Roddy McDowall's performances. Sarandon's portrayal as the vampire was great. I loved how he wasn't just pure evil, at times you actually felt kind of bad for him as he treated it like a curse and just wanted to be left alone. And Roddy McDowall as Peter Vincent was so fun. Just a really enjoyable character to watch. Every time they cut to a shot of him being shocked or scared I laughed.




#20) Fright Night Part II (1988) (Oct 21)

"Let's talk about blood, Mr. Vincent. It's very precious to me."

At first I was a little disappointed with this one because having Charley convinced that Dandrige being a vampire was all in his head seemed like a cheap way to just repeat the story beats from the original and the final tease of Fright Night wasn't carried over, but I got over that pretty quick once things got rolling.

The 80s cheese won me over and I had a great time with this one as well. The characters and humor were just so much fun.




#21) Fright Night (2011) (Oct 21)

"That is a terrible vampire name. Jerry?"

When I watch a remake, I try to judge it on its own merits, but there are two things I look for if I've seen the original:
1) Does it have enough new content/changes to still be interesting?
2) With the changes, does it still keep the spirit and/or themes of the original?

I think the Fright Night remake comes pretty close and I had a good time with it. Sure, they changed quite a bit, but I felt they captured the humor and feel of the original. Probably the biggest issue is that even though Colin Farrell obviously had a lot of fun playing a modern Dandrige and I liked his performance, the character came off as just an evil villain in this one. There wasn't really much in the way of him being sympathetic or being pained by his curse, he was just out to kill.

Other than that, I think the cast was great. The humor worked and other than Dandrige's character being more evil, I don't think they missed the point of the original.

Overall, good weekend for me.


Final Viewed List:

#01) The Cabin in the Woods (2012) (Oct 1)
#02) Piranha (1978) (Oct 2)
#03) Piranha DD (2012) (Oct 3)
#04) The Living Dead Girl (aka La morte vivante) (1982) (Oct 4)
#05) Anthropophagus: The Grim Reaper (1980) (Oct 5)
#06) Killer Klowns from Outer Space (1988) (Oct 6) (rewatch)
#07) The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986) (Oct 7) (rewatch)
#08) The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning (2006) (Oct 8) (rewatch)
#09) Motel Hell (1980) (Oct 9)
#10) Deranged (1974) (Oct 10)
#11) The Burning (1981) (Oct 11)
#12) Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982) (Oct 12) (rewatch)
#13) The Fly (1958) (Oct 13)
#14) The Fly (1986) (Oct 14) (rewatch)
#15) The Fly II (1989) (Oct 15) (rewatch)
#16) Nazis at the Center of the Earth (2012) (Oct 16)
#17) Abraham Lincoln vs Zombies (2012) (Oct 17)
#18) Exit Humainity (2011) (Oct 19)
#19) Fright Night (1985) (Oct 20)
#20) Fright Night Part II (1988) (Oct 21)
#21) Fright Night (2011) (Oct 21)
Reply With Quote
  #93  
Old 10-22-2012, 05:33 PM
From day 19 to day 22 . . .

21) Night of the Blood Beast (1958) - Part of a 50 movie boxset. An unremarkable film about an astronaut returning to Earth with an alien parasite. Nothing you haven't seen before. Wasn't in the right mood to watch anything else at the time.

22) Altered States (1980) - It was long overdue to re-watch this. William Hurt plays a scientist obsessed with researching and experiencing other states of consciousness - right down to the primal urges of apes we used to be. Using an untested drug and water tanks, he and audience experience incredible hallucinations. And eventually, he transforms into a primal ape. It is an amazing film.

23) Death Nurse (1987) - As covered at my Video Store. An average shot-on-video film about a deranged nurse and doctor.

24) The Devil's Backbone (2001) - I kept putting this off for too long. Directed by Guillermo Del Toro of "Hellboy" fame. It wasn't what I was expecting. Less of a dark ghost story and more of a dramatic, adult thriller set during the Spanish Civil War. A Spanish horror film is a nice change of pace. It was worth seeing.

So far, 24 for 22. 9 days and 7 movies remaining. This will be a first. Clearly, never did watch 31 movies before in all those days. Not in October or any month. There is a constant reminder to keep up and a need for a variety of sub-genres to survive. So far, I'm not feeling worn out. I'm actually treating this October like it's the last one - just in case doomsday 2012 is for real.

Coming out tomorrow on DVD is "Wrong Turn 5" and I can't wait. I'm just as excited for it as I was for "Resident Evil 5." There just aren't that many reliable franchises left over nowadays, theatrical or straight-to-video. There is also "Paranormal Activity 4," but have not bothered with any of the three previous films. Zero interest. Did see "Silent Hill" six years ago and enjoyed it, but not feeling any need to see the sequel.

Last edited by Duke Nukem; 10-22-2012 at 05:36 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #94  
Old 10-23-2012, 07:00 AM


#22) Insidious (2010) (Oct 22)

"It's the first line of a joke, right? Guy comes home to find his wife with a priest?"

I had planned to watch Insidious for my marathon last year, but I kept missing the showtimes on cable and then just forgot about it. It was still playing this year so I made sure to catch it. I wish I missed it again

I absolutely hated it. I think it's time I finally admitted these haunted house style movies are just not for me and give up trying to watch them. There's very few I've actually enjoyed - and the ones I did were because they had some kind of twist that made it interesting.

The scares just didn't work at all for me. Everything felt so telegraphed and predictable that nothing surprised me and it relied way too much on the typical LOUD NOISES OH NO THE DOOR IS OPEN THERE'S A SHADOW IN THE CORNER garbage that all these movies rely on. All it was missing was a cat jumping out from a dark corner and maybe a self-playing piano. There's absolutely nothing original about the first half of the movie.

When it finally did move away from the haunted house cliches, it became even worse (if that's possible). Who thought it was a good idea to make the two paranormal investigation guys comic relief? Pretty much any chance the film had of being scary was lost when these two guys were bumbling around. I appreciate them trying to change up the plot a bit, but the blend of
Spoiler:
the Exorcist and Poltergeist
that they had going on came off as way too silly. I was honestly fighting to just stay awake during this thing.

But hey, at least Rose Byrne is attractive.


Final Viewed List:

#01) The Cabin in the Woods (2012) (Oct 1)
#02) Piranha (1978) (Oct 2)
#03) Piranha DD (2012) (Oct 3)
#04) The Living Dead Girl (aka La morte vivante) (1982) (Oct 4)
#05) Anthropophagus: The Grim Reaper (1980) (Oct 5)
#06) Killer Klowns from Outer Space (1988) (Oct 6) (rewatch)
#07) The Texas Chainsaw Massacre 2 (1986) (Oct 7) (rewatch)
#08) The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning (2006) (Oct 8) (rewatch)
#09) Motel Hell (1980) (Oct 9)
#10) Deranged (1974) (Oct 10)
#11) The Burning (1981) (Oct 11)
#12) Halloween III: Season of the Witch (1982) (Oct 12) (rewatch)
#13) The Fly (1958) (Oct 13)
#14) The Fly (1986) (Oct 14) (rewatch)
#15) The Fly II (1989) (Oct 15) (rewatch)
#16) Nazis at the Center of the Earth (2012) (Oct 16)
#17) Abraham Lincoln vs Zombies (2012) (Oct 17)
#18) Exit Humainity (2011) (Oct 19)
#19) Fright Night (1985) (Oct 20)
#20) Fright Night Part II (1988) (Oct 21)
#21) Fright Night (2011) (Oct 21)
#22) Insidious (2010) (Oct 22)
Reply With Quote
  #95  
Old 10-23-2012, 10:22 PM
#18: Hellraiser: Deader



I guess that's the punishment I have to endure for choosing to watch films I haven't yet seen with intention of completing them, for this marathon.

Not any better than the previous installment, which I don't even remember the subtitle of. Though I did find it that it was slightly back to form with the Cenobites in the last scene. Still sucked, poor Kari Wuhrer couldn't save it.

3/10
Reply With Quote
  #96  
Old 10-24-2012, 07:09 PM
#19: Hellraiser: Hellworld



Slightly better, but what irks me is just how far these series strayed from Barker's material. There's absolutely no canon here anymore, they just do whatever they wish. This was essentially the first Hellraiser slasher. But because it didn't totally suck, I give it a....

5/10
Reply With Quote
  #97  
Old 10-24-2012, 07:28 PM
#20: The Pit and the Pendulum



I don't think there will ever be a day where I'll get tired of anything by Poe, Vincent Price, or Corman. But when these three elements are combined, that's a done deal for me of greatness. Such interesting pieces of fiction. Everything from the music, to atmosphere and direction just does it for me.

7/10
Reply With Quote
  #98  
Old 10-25-2012, 01:08 AM
#21: Near Dark



Meant to check this out for many years, and finally have done so. Very decent effort by Bigelow. You can essentially tell that the feel that follows many of Bigelow's next films was first seen here. I liked this take on vampires. Very fresh and original.

7/10
Reply With Quote
  #99  
Old 10-25-2012, 10:46 AM
I watched the first two Hellraiser movies for the first time last year, so I figured this year I'd do the next two and continue doing two per year until I've slogged my way though the entire franchise. My soul will never be the same.



#23) Hellraiser III: Hell on Earth (1992) (Oct 23)

"Oh, it's unbearable, isn't it? The suffering of strangers, the agony of friends. There is a secret song at the center of the world, Joey, and its sound is like razors through flesh."

(MILD SPOILER WARNING)

After the direction Hellbound: Hellraiser II took with the cenobites, the series was pretty much lost to me. Poor word of mouth of the further sequels also didn't leave me with much hope, so I went into Hellraiser III with no expectations.

The second the Pinhead statue skinned then devoured the woman I knew what mindset I had to have for this one, so I sat down and got myself ready for a ridiculous time and I ended up laughing my ass off as this movie descended into absurdity.

I don't quite know how we got to this point from the dark, bleak original about sexual perversions and temptations to a robotic cenobite walking around throwing CDs into people's faces, but holy shit this was hilarious.

I can't believe how over-the-top this one got. Even Pinhead's typical gloomy dialogue was turned up to 11. It was so fun to watch him walk around spouting dark poetry like some goth kid performing a self-written monologue for his drama class. Hell, he even desecrates a Church! This one has it all!

HILARIOUS!




#24) Hellraiser: Bloodline (1996) (Oct 24)

"'Pain?' How dare you use that word. What you think of as pain is a shadow. Pain has a face. Allow me to show it to you. Gentlemen, I... am... pain."

PINHEAD IN SPAAAAAAACCCCCCCCEEEEEEEEEEE!

Of course like all quality horror franchises, you just have to go to space for a sequel and after the insanity of Hellraiser 3, how could this go wrong? Seeing "Alan Smithee" listed as the director during the opening credits should have tipped me off.

Unlike Hellraiser II and III, this one actually seems to dial it back a bit and is closer in feel to the original film. There's even some direct visual references to Barker's work. Unfortunately, the plot and acting just aren't good enough to support the more serious take on the world and the whole thing comes off as a bit of a bore.

The space stuff only serves as bookended sections of the film, the rest deals with the main character's decedents (one of which is the creator of the puzzle box). It's actually not a bad idea, but the execution leaves a lot to be desired. Pinhead gets way too much screen time, and even him babbling on with his Gothic mumbo jumbo can't save Doug Bradley's tired, bored performance. He really phoned this one in. The lead actor is pretty terrible as well.

Pinhead himself is also greatly out of character. His more evil/active nature in #3 is explained and then resolved in that film, so I don't see why his new personality is carried over into this one. Instead of pleasing/punishing people for opening the box, he's actively trying to link Earth and Hell so he can destroy the world? Why? Perhaps this one was better in the script stage before the studio involvement ruined it, but as it is, I don't think it really made much sense.

And then of course after this one Pinhead is banished from theaters and imprisoned to straight to DVD for eternity. Oh, the horror!

Last edited by ThirstyFly; 10-25-2012 at 11:11 AM..
Reply With Quote
  #100  
Old 10-26-2012, 12:31 AM
ThirstyFly, it pretty much goes downhill after Bloodline, however Inferno is still an okay film. I think the first three films are the best. Hell on Earth, I enjoyed it a lot.

#22: Cherry Falls



Finally sat down to watch this. Actually a very decent STV slasher. The rating this thing has on IMDb is ridiculous. Oh, and btw, this has Biehn in it

7/10
Reply With Quote
  #101  
Old 10-26-2012, 03:19 PM
An explanation for the "Hellraiser" straight-to-video sequels is that they, with the exception of "Hellworld," were existing scripts re-written to become "Hellraiser"-oriented. Why not write brand spankin' new scripts? As far as Doug Bradley wrote in his book, they just didn't. And by the time of the recent stv sequel without him, they just told him to show up, make the movie quickly and get it out there. Forget about the quality work and passion, just make it!

Believe it or not, Clive Barker did come up with the idea of placing Pinhead in space. But then again, it's less about space and more about the past-present-future of the puzzle box, which was a good approach ruined by so many factors. Besides the studio interference and rough production, Bradley enjoyed working with special effect guy/director, Kevin Yagher - who did his best to deal with the studio interference. And the finished movie is decent considering. Of the stv sequels, Bradley disliked Part 5/Inferno, appreciated the effort and reappearance of Kirsty Cotton in Part 6/Hellseeker, and did find something to like in the reels of Part 7/Deader that he was able to see before its release. He did not see the reels for "Hellworld" and has no comment. But he did like having the opportunity to work with Lance Henrikson.

Me personally...

Hellraiser - *** out of 4

Hellbound: Hellraiser II - ***

Hellraiser III: Hell on Earth - **1/2 or *** - take it on a different level and one can enjoy it

Hellraiser: Bloodline - **1/2 or *** - despite the studio interference, the ideas are there and do somewhat come through

Hellraiser: Inferno - **1/2 or *** - it's been a while, but I recall liking it

Hellraiser: Hellseeker - **1/2 - it's been a while. I recall finding it redundant of "Memento" or something, despite Kirsty Cotton's return. Then again, the full reminder of her character and connection to the earlier films was left as a deleted scene. Heaven forbid newer fans seek interest in the earlier films after seeing this one.

Hellraiser: Deader - *** - it's been a while, but I recall enjoying it and finding a stronger "Hellraiser" connection.

Hellraiser: Hellworld - **1/2 - it's been a while, but I remember it well enough to know it's a joke. But take it on a different level, and it is watchable.

Last edited by Duke Nukem; 10-26-2012 at 03:27 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #102  
Old 10-26-2012, 03:48 PM
From day 23 to day 26 . . .

25) Children of the Corn 666: Isaac's Return (1999) - By now, the original children have children of their own and are seeking to re-fulfill a prophecy. And leading the new cult is John Franklin's Isaac from the original. This aspect is interesting, but the movie as a whole is another so-so entry. About as good as Part V, better than Parts I and IV, and falls short of the greatness of Parts II and III (or rather, the best to expect from the series). The guest stars to unexpectedly show their faces are Stacy Keach and Nancy Allen.

26) Wrong Turn 5: Bloodlines (2012) - This straight-to-video effort is a blast and doesn't disappoint. It is nuts. The fifth entry centers on that West Virginia town "celebrating" its disturbing history with backwoods mountain men, by holding a Halloween festival in which to dress up as the deformed monsters. Really? Seriously? Doug Bradley plays a normal backwoods killer who watches over the three mountain men.

There are possibly two missed opportunities others might make an issue out of. This festival is just another excuse for teenagers/young adults to drink and get into trouble. Would a blackout really stop them? Where do most of the young people disappear to? Why isn't there a bigger massacre past midnight? When did young people become responsible? There is something small-scale about it. The other missed opportunity is that Mr. Bradley is locked up in a jail cell most of the time, while "his boys" are out killing and waiting to get him out. No matter. These aspects didn't bother me, but others might question it. The main setting is a part of town by the police station, and the plot is centered on five young adults who get into trouble early on after a run-in with Bradley. Don't take these observations the wrong way. There are enough additional supporting characters to make a nice bodycount. And even in a jail cell, Bradley has a commanding presence. It is a very different villainous turn from Pinhead. He must have been grateful to play a bad guy without make-up. He chews the scenery in ways Pinhead wasn't allowed to. The death scenes are bloody and inventive, while the movie is brutal, vicious and cruel fun.

27) The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning (2006) - After three not-so-great sequels and an okay remake, this is the follow-up to truly live up to the original. No more campiness, no more funny shit, no more nonsense from the MPAA, and no more bullshit. "Leatherface: The Texas Chainsaw Massacre III" is a decent and badass entry in its own right, and I like to think that this prequel is what it strived and wasn't allowed to be. Once you walk away from the original and step into the 1980's and on, these films weren't going to be "quietly" violent anymore. They were inevitable going to embrace the power saw in the title. This film delivers the bloody chainsaw carnage and is a vicious ride, but I also find it to deliver the necessary suspense and intensity to legitimatize its place in the series.

So far, 27 for 26.

Last edited by Duke Nukem; 10-26-2012 at 03:57 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #103  
Old 10-26-2012, 04:51 PM
Duke Nukem, that was interesting insight about Doug Bradley and Hellraiser. Thanks for sharing that.
Reply With Quote
  #104  
Old 10-26-2012, 07:16 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Digifruitella View Post
ThirstyFly, it pretty much goes downhill after Bloodline, however Inferno is still an okay film. I think the first three films are the best. Hell on Earth, I enjoyed it a lot.
I do this marathon on another forum I visit as well and I actually had Inferno recommended to me after loving the original last year, so I'll be watching that for sure. Unfortunately, if I keep up the 2 per year, it's gonna have to wait until next October.

I do enjoy going though entire series, good and bad though just to see how they evolve/devolve. I went though all of the Halloween movies earlier this year having only seen a few of them before hand and had a good time of it, even if some were... not so great.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Duke Nukem View Post
An explanation for the "Hellraiser" straight-to-video sequels is that they, with the exception of "Hellworld," were existing scripts re-written to become "Hellraiser"-oriented. Why not write brand spankin' new scripts? As far as Doug Bradley wrote in his book, they just didn't. And by the time of the recent stv sequel without him, they just told him to show up, make the movie quickly and get it out there. Forget about the quality work and passion, just make it!

Believe it or not, Clive Barker did come up with the idea of placing Pinhead in space. But then again, it's less about space and more about the past-present-future of the puzzle box, which was a good approach ruined by so many factors. Besides the studio interference and rough production, Bradley enjoyed working with special effect guy/director, Kevin Yagher - who did his best to deal with the studio interference. And the finished movie is decent considering. Of the stv sequels, Bradley disliked Part 5/Inferno, appreciated the effort and reappearance of Kirsty Cotton in Part 6/Hellseeker, and did find something to like in the reels of Part 7/Deader that he was able to see before its release. He did not see the reels for "Hellworld" and has no comment. But he did like having the opportunity to work with Lance Henrikson.
That's really interesting, thanks for that. I must admit, I like the idea of the movies not really being about Pinhead and him actually being a sub character, so who knows what I'll end up thinking about them. Too bad they didn't put more care into them though. I don't know if you guys listen to the Arrow in the Head podcast too, but they discussed Inferno a few weeks ago they weren't too impressed with it, but I thought it sounded pretty cool.

Last edited by ThirstyFly; 10-26-2012 at 07:20 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #105  
Old 10-26-2012, 07:17 PM
John Carpenter double feature!



#25) The Fog (1980) (Oct 25)

"It just got cold in here..."

I'm sure everyone else has seen this, so there's not much for me to say. Good atmosphere, good pacing, good music, good Atkins. Good time.

I don't think I'd put this in the same league as Halloween or The Thing but it was definitely a great movie and I had a fun time with it. The scares were done very well compared to the pathetic and predictable attempts at jump scares we get in modern horror movies. They had some real unexpected jumps in there. Good times.




#26) In the Mouth of Madness (1994) (Oct 26)

"Reality is not what it used to be."

Carpenter doing a Lovecraftian style tale? Awesome. I loved this. I'm not going to go into the story on this one, but the way the mystery unfolded as the insanity grew was so well paced and Sam Neill was terrific. Really cool visuals and a very creepy atmosphere.

Now I'm going to have to rewatch Prince of Darkness too. Too bad October is running out of days

It's crazy how good Carpenter's output was during the 70s to the 90s. What the hell happened?
Reply With Quote
  #106  
Old 10-26-2012, 08:58 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThirstyFly View Post

I do enjoy going though entire series, good and bad though just to see how they evolve/devolve. I went though all of the Halloween movies earlier this year having only seen a few of them before hand and had a good time of it, even if some were... not so great.
That's pretty much my philosophy too. I intend to finish Hellraiser, during this marathon - I have just this newest one to go through. I also decided to check out Wishmaster 2 after rewatching the first one and no matter how bad the other ones I intend to see those other series as well. The way I see it, even if the flicks suck balls, there's still something there that's interesting. All the Hellraiser films, despite going downhill and straying MAJORLY from Barker's original mythos, still had certain moments in them that were worthy. For instance the 6th one, with that insurance commercial guy, had that brain surgery scene that made me cringe.

#23: Zombie



After so many years of being confused which Zombie is it, or what is the deal with the number "2" next to it despite being unrelated (seriously) to Romero's films - I've finally sat down to watch this. Earlier this year I had the Lucio Fulci bug bite me and since the summer I've watched a few of his classics, so I figured I'll make this film I so wanted to watch for a while, part of this marathon. I gotta say I really dug this. From the funky music, to the Shark vs. Zombie, to the tropical setting and quite awesome Zombie makeup - this was a good flick. At least everything you could ask from Italian horror. And oh my GOD was that scuba babe HOT when she was putting on the gear. Uhh!

8/10
Reply With Quote
  #107  
Old 10-27-2012, 09:55 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThirstyFly View Post

I do enjoy going though entire series, good and bad though just to see how they evolve/devolve. I went though all of the Halloween movies earlier this year having only seen a few of them before hand and had a good time of it, even if some were... not so great.

That's really interesting, thanks for that. I must admit, I like the idea of the movies not really being about Pinhead and him actually being a sub character, so who knows what I'll end up thinking about them. Too bad they didn't put more care into them though. I don't know if you guys listen to the Arrow in the Head podcast too, but they discussed Inferno a few weeks ago they weren't too impressed with it, but I thought it sounded pretty cool.
I have just finished an entire series of my own, the seven original "Children of the Corn" films. Had only previously see the first three.

Day 27 . . .

28) Children of the Corn VII: Revelation (2001) - This series has been the only thing wearing me out during this Halloween marathon. And thankfully, this is the last movie in the series. In this one, a woman shows up at an apartment building in that cursed farming community to look for her grandmother...and so on. Like Part V and 666, it is a tick above average and nothing more. Another hollow vehicle to murder adults in unique and horrible fashions. It has its moments but remains unremarkable. The guest star to who needed to pay the mortgage this time is Michael Ironside. For all the effort involved in this series, Parts II and III are the best. They are stupid fun and make up for the subpar original. The four remaining chapters to follow are overkill.

Now for the official roll call:

Children of the Corn (1984) - *1/2 out of 4
Children of the Corn II: The Final Sacrifice (1992) - **1/2
Children of the Corn III: Urban Harvest (1995) - **1/2
Children of the Corn IV: The Gathering (1996) - **
Children of the Corn V: Fields of Terror (1998) - **1/4
Children of the Corn 666: Isaac's Return (1999) - **1/4
Children of the Corn VI: Revelation (2001) - **1/4

What started off poorly and was redeemed, only kept going on and on and on when it didn't know when to stop. Every time one of these movies is viewed, and the "Based on 'Children of The Corn' by Stephen King" credit appears, a single tear must materialze out of King's eye and he sighs to himself, "Another victim...I am so sorry for contributing to the madness." For this victim, the terror has finally passed and things can only get better from this point on.

Now, viewing all the "Halloween" movies earlier in the year...that must have been something. And some of them for the first time. It starts off well and keeps going up and down like a rollercoaster. Michael Myers had some highs, than a low to slow him down, a high again allowing to start over and then another low...and repeat. He looked good and put on an admirable performance by "Halloween: Resurrection," but his presence is the best thing about it.

Of the bunch, "Halloween III: Season of the Witch" stands out for obvious reasons. It was a much too quiet attempt by John Carpenter to make "Halloween" an anthology series. Either nobody picked up on what he was trying to do or cared. It might stand out, because it is a subpar retread of "Invasion of the Body Snatchers' ideas (as Leonard Maltin noted and gave a BOMB/* rating), or others might feel the John Carpenter vibe in it. I did pick up that vibe and enjoy it for what it is. It has different ideas of its own, even if they apparently borrow from "Invasion of the Body Snatchers," and delivers.

And the "Hellraiser" series. With two of you covering those films, why not share the information. I just finished reading Doug Bradley's book and it is extremely worth reading. To meet the man himself at a convention two months ago, get a copy of his book - Behind the Mask of the Horror Actor - and attend a great Q & A where he and other Cenobite actors spoke about their experiences...is a great way to go out in 2012 before the new year. And then there's reading the book, which reveals another side to him and the plays he participated in with Clive Barker long before "Hellraiser" came along. That and learning about how all the horror actors suffered for their art. From the convention and the book, Bradley is just as funny in real life as he is dark and evil in the "Hellraiser" films.

This leaves four more days and three more movies. It doesn't seem so challenging, yet I have Frankenstorm to contend with. The storm is supposed to arrive here by Monday, so three more movies can be done before you-know-what possibly hits the fan. Can still cover one more movie from my Video Store and make it seven movies within the month.

Last edited by Duke Nukem; 11-04-2012 at 07:08 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #108  
Old 10-27-2012, 11:24 PM
#24: Razorback



Fuck yeah! what a ride. One of the most stylish looking exploitation flicks I've seen to date. Beautiful. And it's clever, and inventive - pacing is rapid fire. I get a kick out of watching exploitation moreso than general horror, because they're just so damn interesting. The content is always some off the wall thing, which is what makes up for the majority of the excitement.

8/10
Reply With Quote
  #109  
Old 10-28-2012, 02:13 PM


#27) An American Werewolf in London (1981) (Oct 27) (rewatch)

"That's right. A lovely stroll on the moors. Tra-la-la-la. Isn't this fun?"

I hadn't planned on rewatching this because I had too many rewatches this year as it is, but I've had my eye on the Blu-ray for a while and this marathon pushed me over the edge.

Back when I was really young, my father and older sister used to like to rent horror movies in the early VHS days and they'd let me watch them too. There's few I remember, but I do know there were some that scared the crap out of me. An American Werewolf in London is the one I have the most vivid memory of. I would have been around 4 when I had seen this and I remember the first werewolf attack on the moors made me flip the fuck out. I couldn't watch the rest of the movie.

I guess I kind of forgot about it because I didn't get around to seeing it again until I was in my 20s when I had wanted to see what scared me so much as a kid and to finally sit down and watch the rest of the movie. I enjoyed it then but I think I enjoy it even more now. I probably went into it then expecting something really scary because of my history with it (and that first attack is pretty brutal) so I don't think the humor of it worked as well on me then as it did now. Great movie and a true classic in the genre.

Now if I could just figure out what the other movie that scared my shitless back then was... all I remember was slugs or something coming out of a toilet and maybe dripping down for a wooden beam in a ceiling. Also someone being attacked in the back of an ambulance, but that's probably a different movie (and I suspect is me just misremembering C.H.U.D.).
Reply With Quote
  #110  
Old 10-28-2012, 02:28 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Duke Nukem View Post
26) Wrong Turn 5: Bloodlines (2012) - This straight-to-video effort is a blast and doesn't disappoint. It is nuts. The fifth entry centers on that West Virginia town "celebrating" its disturbing history with backwoods mountain men, by holding a Halloween festival in which to dress up as the deformed monsters. Really? Seriously? Doug Bradley plays a normal backwoods killer who watches over the three mountain men.
Glad to hear that turned out good. I just picked up the Blu-ray set of the original 3 on sale for a great price (haven't seen any of them) but I'll probably save it for next year's marathon. Hopefully #5 will be cheap by then too, I think you can already get #4 for $10 on BD.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Duke Nukem View Post
Now, viewing all the "Halloween" movies earlier in the year...that must have been something. And some of them for the first time. It starts off well and keeps going up and down like a rollercoaster. Michael Myers had some highs, than a low to slow him down, a high again allowing to start over and then another low...and repeat. He looked good and put on an admirable performance by "Halloween: Resurrection," but his presence is the best thing about it.

Of the bunch, "Halloween III: Season of the Witch" stands out for obvious reasons. It was a much too quiet attempt by John Carpenter to make "Halloween" an anthology series. Either nobody picked up on what he was trying to do or cared. It might stand out, because it is a subpar retread of "Invasion of the Body Snatchers' ideas (as Leonard Maltin noted and gave a BOMB/* rating), or others might feel the John Carpenter vibe in it. I did pick up that vibe and enjoy it for what it is. It has different ideas of its own, even if they apparently borrow from "Invasion of the Body Snatchers," and delivers.
I think when I did the whole series earlier this year I had only previously seen H1, H2, H3 and Resurrection (and the Rob Zombie films) so all the middle movies were new to me. I skipped rewatching H1 and H3 then because I had just rewatched H1 a few months earlier for that year's 31 Days marathon and skipped H3 because I just wanted to see where they went with Mikey. I couldn't bring myself to rewatch the Rob Zombie movies either because I hate them.

With the new Blu-ray releases of H2, 3, 4 and 5 this year though I completed my collection and now have them all on BD (even Rob Zombies...), so I rewatched 2-5 again.

Out of the originals, I kind of like them all, with the exception of 5 and 6. Resurrection gets a lot of shit but I get a guilty pleasure kick out of it. 2 is good and H20 is a great "reboot" of the sequels.

H3 is the real gem though. I wish they had kept the idea of doing a new Halloween themed movie each time, but they kinda ruined that from the start with H2.

Last edited by ThirstyFly; 10-28-2012 at 02:31 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #111  
Old 10-28-2012, 07:57 PM
#25: Stage Fright



The weakest of the ozploitation flicks I've seen so far. Also the premise is now very dated, or rather the twist itself is predictable by today's standards. That's not a fault of the film really, since for 1980 that was still something new and fresh. All the time I was watching this film, I had this gnawing feeling like I've seen another film with a similar twist/premise of a killer's motivations stemming from deep seated psychological issues. Either way, it's beautifully shot, a nice anamorphic slasher still gets points from me. I may be too harsh on this because it was just predictable, and that's a factor no doubt.

6/10

Last edited by Digifruitella; 10-28-2012 at 08:00 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #112  
Old 10-28-2012, 10:45 PM
#26: The Craft



I remember seeing scenes of this flick constantly on TV in the early 2000's. It got ingrained in my mind since then. Surprisingly this is a very decent film. It's easy to pass something like a film about teenage witches off as something lackluster, but that isn't the case with this film at all. It may take a little bit of time to get going, but once it does it's compelling enough. Deals with interesting themes of identity and power and how it corrupts. Yeah, there's definitely a touch of that here. I enjoyed this. Surprised me, fresh. Gets pretty serious and dark throughout, which I appreciated.

8/10
Reply With Quote
  #113  
Old 10-29-2012, 09:06 PM
#27: The Town That Dreaded Sundown



An awesome title for a film, although the same cannot be said for this semi-documentary horror/thriller film about a serial killer that terrorized a small town in the post WWII era. While the film may not have been compelling enough, it did contain some chilling scenes of murder. What's really weak about the film is how the serial killer is handled. He seemed like the most incompetent murderer I've ever seen. It's actually quite funny, because he reminds me of a parody version of Ghostface in Scary Movie.

5/10
Reply With Quote
  #114  
Old 10-29-2012, 10:08 PM


#28) A Little Bit Zombie (2012) (Oct 28)

"Why? I mean aside form the brains and a lil numbness, I'm fine. Besides, when it comes down to it, it's really just a dietary restriction."

So after Shaun of the Dead there's been no shortage of horror comedies and it's probably safe to say most have been pretty forgettable. I thought the trailer for this one was pretty good and being a Canadian picture I decided to check it out as Canada has been on a pretty good run thanks to Hobo with a Shotgun and Father's Day.

Taking a trip to a cabin in the woods (get it?) with his bride-to-be, sister and best friend/brother-in-law, mild mannered everyman Steve soon gets infected with a zombie virus and must fight his urge to eat brains while trying to deal with his bridezilla finance.

While at first the humour felt kind of forced and I was a bit down on it at the start, it doesn't take long to find its legs and it actually turned out to be a pretty enjoyable ride. There's a few references to other horror movies, but they're pretty smart about it and don't beat you over the head with reference after reference and the rest of the humor comes off pretty naturally once things get going. They don't think they're more clever than they actually are like a lot of films in this genre do.

The actors really bring this one together. The lead actor, Kristopher Turner gives a energetic performance and obviously has a lot of fun with the role and it shows. His best friend played by Shawn Roberts (Wesker #2 in the Resident Evil films) basically reenacts Stifler from American Pie, but he's so good at it you can't help but enjoy the character. Stephen McHattie (Pontypool & Exit Humanity) also joins the cast as a very fun (and very crazy) zombie hunter. As for the female cast, Kristen Hager is great as Steve's sister, however Crystal Lowe (whom you may remember form the sizzling tanning both scene in Final Destination 3) and Emilie Ullerup as the zombie hunter's sidekick don't really stack up to the rest of the cast.

Overall, it's a pretty enjoyable flick. I definitely wouldn't put it up there with Shaun of the Dead, but I have no problem saying it's at least at the same level as other recent comedy successes like Severance, Night of the Living Dorks and Dead Snow.




#29) Stake Land (2010) (Oct 29)

"One day you'll learn not to dream at all. Get your shit."

I thought this was pretty decent, but I don't think it's a movie I'd go and recommend to people. The setting and mood were cool and I liked a lot of the ideas they had going, but I felt it never really reached its full potential.

I really liked the cult angle and would have have liked to see it play a bigger, more important role instead of just being a what felt like just a series of random encounters for our heroes.
Spoiler:
The final confrontation with the cult leader also came off really cheesy considering the tone of the rest of the movie. I personally think it would have worked a little better if he had no dialogue at all.


There were also way too many pockets of survivors shown. It just didn't feel desperate enough with so many camps of people and it made no sense that a pregnant woman would join them on such a dangerous trip. It also felt way too long considering the movies pretty short runtime. It was almost like I was a character in the movie because by the end I just wanted some resolution.

I also wasn't too crazy about the zombie-like vampires. Their design was too bland and had no personality and were they barking at one point? Yeah, not a fan of how they were handled.
Reply With Quote
  #115  
Old 10-30-2012, 10:07 PM
#28: Ginger Snaps



While I know what the "message" or intention was with the film, it simply left me feeling empty. This was a rollercoaster type of a film. Starts off okay, then becomes dull, then seems like its redeeming itself, then the payoff isn't all that satisfying. I can guess what the plot was about, but nothing really made any sense. The allegory is about the only thing that was clear, everything else felt like a bunch of nonsense.

4/10
Reply With Quote
  #116  
Old 10-31-2012, 01:41 AM


#30) The Prowler (1981) (Oct 30)

"Could I have your attention, please, ladies and gentlemen? Um... Deputy London has just informed me that a prowler has been seen around the campus, and, uh... Well, he could be dangerous."

I've had my eye on this one for a while and finally decided to pick up the Blu-ray this month for my marathon. The Prowler is your typical 80s slasher. It doesn't do anything new with the genre, but that's forgivable because it's such an early one so it wouldn't have been so monotonous back in 1981 and it's still a pretty solid slasher even if it doesn't break out of the mold.

The real highlight of this one is obviously Tom Savini's gore effects. He really let loose with this one, the kills are vicious! According to IMDb's trivia section, Savini considers this to be his best work. I can see why.

My biggest complaints are that the body count seems lower than it actually is since all of the kills come in pairs and that the red herrings never really worked. It's painfully obvious who the killer is before the reveal and I don't even actively try to figure out who the killer is in these kinds of movies. I prefer just to sit back and watch it unfold before my eyes.

Also, considering the killer's military fatigues, it did look kind of silly how his main weapon was a pitchfork. It would have been cooler if they could have come up with some more military weapons along with the military knives he also carried. At least he puts the pitchfork to good use.

Overall, I had fun with this one. It really reminded me of how much I enjoy (and miss) 80s slashers. I'm sure there's plenty lesser known ones I've missed out on, so I'll have to start looking into that.
Reply With Quote
  #117  
Old 10-31-2012, 05:36 PM
Happy Halloween! Boo!

"The Prowler" is a good slasher film and "Halloween/Friday The 13th" rip-off. Excellent work by Tom Savini. A uniqe killer. Only complaint, the direction takes a little too much time and drags some scenes out to pad out the running time. But I can live with that. If there was ever a remake, Cillian Murphy and Kirsten Dunst would be perfect dopplegangers for the main characters. NOTE TO STUDIOS: Not a suggestion, just an observation. We don't need anymore remakes of `80's slashers. Put your laptop down in that Starbucks and take another sip of your coffee.

From day 28 to day 31 . . .

Frankenstorm turned out to be nothing serious in my area and I was able to go out this Halloween with a bang.

29) One Dark Night (1983) - As covered at my Video Store. An initiation-turned-undead-being-resurrected affair.

30) Deep Shock (2001) - When you frequently come across the following review - Poor David Keith. A wonderful actor stuck in a terrible movie about a giant electric eel attacking an underwater complex - in a movie review book and find that movie, you have to see it for yourself. And surprise, surprise, it isn't that bad. The special effects aren't believable whatsoever, but I didn't let that bother me. A trench opens up in the North Pole and global warming becomes a serious issue. The proposed solution is to nuke the North Pole. Really? Seriously? The douchebags who fire the nukes look like they want to just because they can (forget about nature, let's blow shit up!). One of the said douchebags deservedly gets burnt to a crisp. The female scientist who opposes using missiles believes there might be intelligent life in the North Pole from space, so she doesn't look any better. She is also naturally divorced from the military man in charge of the operation, so that they can get back together at the end. This owes a lot to "The Abyss." It is a Syfy/straight-to-video venture and does not demand high expectations. It is okay for what it is and the acting is okay, too.

31) Below (2002) - This is something new. A haunted submarine. Like an "old dark house" movie, it has a mystery and some spooky elements. However, I enjoyed this a lot more in the theater a decade ago. It is not entirely successful at translating familiar ideas into a fresh setting. It is a little dry. But it is well-crafted and has a strong cast. Features an early appearance by Zach Galifianakis before studios would take his unpernouncible last name seriously.

32) Manhattan Baby (1982) - As covered at my Video Store. A change of pace from Lucio Fulci with a story about a cursed jewel possessing an archeologist's daughter.

Thirty-two movies in thirty-one days. I doubt I could do this again next year. I would need to turn to a lot of franchise movies and might require another unwatched series to pad it out. Never did watch 30-odd movies in a month before, and don't want to do it again. At least for a long time. Wore out my DVD player. It was fun, though.

Last edited by Duke Nukem; 10-31-2012 at 05:40 PM..
Reply With Quote
  #118  
Old 10-31-2012, 05:49 PM
#29: Living Skeleton



Coming roughly a decade before John Carpenter's The Fog - a film that while not directly inspired by Living Skeleton, still retains similarities. This is a slow burn type of film, which Japanese were good at executing back in the day. The film is drenched in atmosphere; ultra widescreen + black and white, then you add the ingredients that make up most of these films scary and you have quite a film on your hands... even if it's flawed. The last act alone is intense and is just another illustration of the skill of Japanese filmmakers in constructing atmospheric and intense horror scenes.

7/10
Reply With Quote
  #119  
Old 10-31-2012, 06:56 PM
#30: Cronos



A much different spin on vampires, and a solid first effort by Guillermo Del Toro.

7/10
Reply With Quote
  #120  
Old 10-31-2012, 08:44 PM
#31: Shutter



Not a perfect film to finish off the marathon with, since it's so much more inferior to the original... but, it's a success. 31 NEW films seen. Now let's finish off the night with Halloween II and the JoBlo commentary

4/10
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump