#1  
Old 01-30-2012, 12:41 AM
The Overlooked 70's Film Thread

I've seen most of the great classic films of the 70's, but I wanted to start a thread for lesser known films from that great decade.

I'd like to get some recommendations for films for me and other schmoes to see. I'll list the ones that I've already seen that I think would qualify.


The Landlord
Loving
Tora! Tora! Tora!
The Anderson Tapes
The Hired Hand
The Hospital
Little Murders
The Panic In Needle Park
The Pursuit Of Happiness
See No Evil
Bad Company
Fat City
The Getaway
Horror Express
The Hot Rock
Junior Bonner
Bang The Drum Slowly
Charley Varrick
Electra Glide In Blue
Emperor Of The North
The Laughing Policeman
The Paper Chase
The Seven-Ups
Juggernaut
The Parallax View
Bite The Bullet
The Great Waldo Pepper
Night Moves
Three Days Of The Condor
The Front
The Gumball Rally
The Shootist
Islands In The Stream
MacArthur
Go Tell The Spartans
Straight Time
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  #2  
Old 01-30-2012, 04:29 PM
Crawlspace is a great straight to TV movie.
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  #3  
Old 01-30-2012, 04:47 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matchbox225 View Post
The Hired Hand
Bad Company
Junior Bonner
Charley Varrick
Electra Glide In Blue
Emperor Of The North
Bite The Bullet
Night Moves
The Gumball Rally

I'm getting down to the last of the 2011 films I wanted to see, so now I got time for these. I seen some of them long ago. Junior Bonner and Charley Varrick I definitely seen, but I don't remember them well.
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  #4  
Old 01-30-2012, 05:39 PM
Blue Collar is an excellent film with Harvey Keitel and Richard Pryor

Battles Without Honor and Humanity is an epic yakuza film series.

Three Days of the Condor is an excellent spy thriller from director Sydney Pollack.

The Getaway is my second favorite Sam Peckinpah movie and I never hear anyone talking about it.

The Yakuza is a great, somewhat mellow action film written partially by Paul Schrader and directed by Sidney Pollack. Also starring Robert Mitchum.

Manhattan is a great Woody Allen film, don't know if it's overlooked or not, but I don't hear it mentioned very often.

Days of Heaven is another movie i'm not sure if's overlooked.
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  #5  
Old 01-30-2012, 06:26 PM
I'll strongly second Blue Collar and The Yakuza and add Ridley Scott's feature debut The Duellists, as well as Yanks, Buck and the Preacher, Cooley High, They Only Kill Their Masters, The Missouri Breaks and The Friends of Eddie Coyle.

Matchbox's original list is excellent. All at least solid and watchable and many real gems. Even 2nd and 3rd string '70's films tended to be worth the effort.

I was making my way down the list and mentally compiling what I would add to it. You really pulled the rug out from under me by having Spartans and Straignt Time. They're alwawys go-to recommendations from me when these lists come up.
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  #6  
Old 01-30-2012, 09:47 PM
Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia, I watched this the first time this weekend. I'd it ranks up there with the Wild Bunch.

Mean Streets-It's highly regarded by most Scorsese fans but it's not that well known.
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  #7  
Old 01-30-2012, 11:08 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frosty_86 View Post
Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia, I watched this the first time this weekend. I'd it ranks up there with the Wild Bunch.
I don't know if it's up there with The Wild Bunch, but it is a very cool movie. Good call.
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  #8  
Old 01-30-2012, 11:14 PM
Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia is a good one I haven't seen in years. That may be one to definitely rewatch.

Two good documentaries are:

Malcolm X (1972)- made, essentially, by the same man who would write the screenplay for the 1992 film with Denzel Washington (but would, sadly never live to see the movie made) is a fascinating documentary of Malcolm X, much more watchable than the fictionalized film version, it is the life of X through X's words, from his mouth. Only certain background details are set up with James Earl Jones reading from X's autobiogrphy.

Manson (1972) - A curio for even those with a passing interest in the 60's, the pressures of the time limited filmmaker Robert Hendrickson from truly getting in everything he wanted but the result paints a striking picture all on its own; while Manson and his murderous cohorts face trial, we meet the rest of the family at large, listening to their words and observing some of their rituals, spending time with them at their Southern California hideaways. It is an interesting piece on violence, Hendrickson would much later release a sequel though a re-cut Manson would've been a much more epic idea. One of my favorites.

Both would actually make an interesting double bill. the comparison between X and Manson is interesting, how one went from violence to find peace and vice versa.
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  #9  
Old 01-31-2012, 12:09 AM
Is it too late to discuss exploitation films?
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  #10  
Old 01-31-2012, 12:42 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Briare Rabbit View Post
much more watchable than the fictionalized film version
Apples and oranges.
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  #11  
Old 01-31-2012, 01:22 AM
First film I can think of is The Last Detail. Wasn't overlooked in its time, but you hear about that one less and less now unless you meet a Hal Ashby fan. It has a brilliant performance by Jack Nicholson and possibly Randy Quaid's best performance. It's one of my favorites.

Scarecrow with Al Pacino and Gene Hackman. Nice little character study about two reluctant friends who meet on the road on their way across the country.

Walter Hill's the Driver. The Driver has awesome car chases and some nice moments. It's a very self-aware film. The characters are all named by what they do. The Driver's played by Ryan O'Neal and Bruce Dern plays a great asshole as the Detective. It's a fun movie.

Couple more: James Toback's Fingers with Harvey Keitel, the French Connection 2, and Spielberg's first film the Sugarland Express which is a solid first effort.

Last edited by Cop No. 633; 01-31-2012 at 01:24 AM..
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  #12  
Old 01-31-2012, 02:00 AM
Very nice thread. I love lesser known movies, especially from the 70's.

Race with the devil
Bad ronald
Duel
The Late Show
Let's Scare Jessica To Death
Tourist Trap
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  #13  
Old 01-31-2012, 11:38 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Geddy View Post
Very nice thread. I love lesser known movies, especially from the 70's.

Race with the devil
Bad ronald
Duel
The Late Show
Let's Scare Jessica To Death
Tourist Trap
yes excellent thread.I also love lesser known movies from the 70's and Duel is a great one.I have heard of Tourist Trap.that sounds like an exciting one as well.Another great one is Race With The Devil.Very exciting and scary film.I saw that on tv late at night one night when I was in high school and it gave me a nightmare.Being in high school and seeing it late at night will do that to you with this film.It stars Henry Fonda and Warren Oates.amazing that from MatchBox's list,the only ones I have heard of are Tora,Tora,Tora,The Gumball Rally,Bite The Bullet and MacArthur.Strangely enough Tora Tora Tora is the ONLY one on that list I have seen.Thats an excellent film everybody who hasnt seen here NEEDS to see.Its about the bombing of pearl harbour.I think I might have seen Macarthur once years ago.Not sure.I got to see it sometime soon since I dont remember it.I love war films.Another good movie to add in that mix is the classic Midway.

Last edited by Mr Parker; 01-31-2012 at 11:50 AM..
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  #14  
Old 01-31-2012, 12:10 PM
I just watched another movie that I thought was pretty good called Black Sunday. John Frankenheimer directed it.
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  #15  
Old 01-31-2012, 12:28 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matchbox225 View Post
I just watched another movie that I thought was pretty good called Black Sunday. John Frankenheimer directed it.
Yep. Great John Williams score in that too.
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  #16  
Old 01-31-2012, 06:02 PM
Jaws 2
The Black Hole
Fritz the Cat
Watership Down
The First Nudie Musical
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  #17  
Old 02-01-2012, 01:00 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cop No. 633 View Post
First film I can think of is The Last Detail. Wasn't overlooked in its time, but you hear about that one less and less now unless you meet a Hal Ashby fan. It has a brilliant performance by Jack Nicholson and possibly Randy Quaid's best performance. It's one of my favorites.
It's on the Nicholson '70's Performances Mt. Rushmore, along with Five Easy Pieces, Chinatown and Cuckoo's Nest
Quote:
Walter Hill's the Driver. The Driver has awesome car chases and some nice moments. It's a very self-aware film. The characters are all named by what they do. The Driver's played by Ryan O'Neal and Bruce Dern plays a great asshole as the Detective. It's a fun movie.
I watched that about a year ago and was pretty disappointed. It had some moments but not enough.
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  #18  
Old 02-01-2012, 01:12 AM
Speaking of Nicholson, has anybody seen King Of Marvin Gardens?

Is it any good?
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  #19  
Old 02-01-2012, 04:03 AM
Yes and yes, Not quite up to the level of the four I mentioned but quite good. Ellen Burstyn at her foxiest.
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  #20  
Old 02-01-2012, 04:27 AM
I'd like to submit the following:

"Hi, Mom!" (Brian DePalma, 1970)
"Little Murders" (Alan Arkin, 1971)
"The Beguiled" (Don Siegel, 1971)
"The Great Northfield, Minnesota Raid" (Philip Kaufman, 1972)
"California Split" (Robert Altman, 1974)
"The Tenant" (Roman Polanski, 1976)
"Martin" (George A. Romero, 1977)

Last edited by hoojib127; 02-02-2012 at 08:00 AM..
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  #21  
Old 02-01-2012, 04:54 AM
Northfield is particularly cool and reminds me (because of Duvall) that no one has mentioned Martin Ritt's Joe Kidd, which is one of my favorite Eastwood Westerns of the decade.
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  #22  
Old 02-01-2012, 08:32 AM
How about The Conversation? I'm not sure if it's overlooked but Coppola's other films of the time do tend to overshadow it a bit. Gene Hackman is fantastic as is John Cazale.
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  #23  
Old 02-01-2012, 08:38 AM
Some of my 70's favourites that you don't hear mentioned often enough,

10 Rillington Place
Performance
Jubilee
Punishment Park
Phantom of The Paradise
The Wanderers
The Squeeze
The Spirit of the Beehive
Scum
O Lucky Man!
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  #24  
Old 02-01-2012, 11:51 AM
Just thought of a couple more.

Dark Star is a very funny scifi/black comedy from John Carpenter and Silent Running is another scifi film with an environmental theme. Both seem to be overlooked but I would consider them classics of the science fiction genre.
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  #25  
Old 02-01-2012, 01:55 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by smacaskill View Post
How about The Conversation? I'm not sure if it's overlooked but Coppola's other films of the time do tend to overshadow it a bit. Gene Hackman is fantastic as is John Cazale.
YES! I knew I was forgetting one! The Conversation is excellent, and it came out the same year as Godfather pt II and Chinatown!!!
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  #26  
Old 02-02-2012, 08:01 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Badbird View Post
Watership Down
YES. Great animated film. John Hurt as the voice of the lead rabbit? That's too good to pass up. Just look at that poster...

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  #27  
Old 02-03-2012, 09:16 AM
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  #28  
Old 02-03-2012, 10:26 PM
I'm going to add some more.

The Candidate
Jeremiah Johnson
Shampoo
Bound For Glory
Great Scout And Cathouse Thursday
Breaking Away
Catch-22
Slaughterhouse-Five
The Day Of The Jackal
Dillinger
My Name Is Nobody
Lenny
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  #29  
Old 02-03-2012, 10:40 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matchbox225 View Post
Speaking of Nicholson, has anybody seen King Of Marvin Gardens?

Is it any good?
It's definitely worth checking out, especially if you're a big Nicholson fan. It's not as good as Five Easy Pieces or Chinatown, for sure -- but, I'd still say it's underrated.
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  #30  
Old 02-04-2012, 04:04 AM
I was just rewatching The Long Goodbye with Eliot Gould. What I found very interesting was Eliot Gould's character (Sam Marlowe) during one scene makes it clear that he is going to appeal directly to Ronald Reagan (the then-governor of California). Little did any of the cast and crew or audience of this movie know at the time that one virtually-unknown actor in their midst in his 2nd screen appearance would also himself later become the governor of the State of California.

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  #31  
Old 02-04-2012, 05:29 AM
Phillip Marlowe.

That's an excellent film. Somewhat controversial at the time, with self styled "experts" on Film Noir angry at Altman's tweaking of the character. The irony being that the great Leigh Brackett, (who co-wrote the script for the Hawks version of The Big Sleep, as well as more ballsy hard boiled detective fiction than any of those assholes could absorb in a lifetime), was the script writer and the ending is nastier and tougher than Chandler's novel.
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  #32  
Old 02-04-2012, 11:03 AM
The original The Taking of Pelham 123 - awesome movie about sleazy, 70s New York.
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  #33  
Old 03-31-2012, 11:32 PM
I'm bumping this back up.

I recently received my copy of King Of Marvin Gardens in the mail. I asked about it earlier in the thread and the few who responded made me want to get it, so hopefully in the next few days I'll be watching it.

I also bought Thieves Like Us, which is a Robert Altman movie that isn't talked about a lot.


I also just recently saw another good movie that fits this thread.

It's Posse, starring and directed by Kirk Douglas.



I didn't know about this movie until a few years ago when Quentin Tarantino hosted a screening of it with Kirk in attendence.

It's about a Marshall, played by Douglas, who has his sites set on becoming U.S. senator. In order to boost his chances, he decides to go after bad guy Bruce Dern with his posse. He hopes to win the people's trust, but things don't go as planned.

One of the things that was unusual was having a movie about running for some political office be placed in a Western setting. That's one of the things I liked about it and what makes it different from most other Westerns.

It's an impressive directorial job by Kirk Douglas and it makes me wonder why he never directed more.
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  #34  
Old 04-01-2012, 05:28 AM
Thieves Like Us is a typically terrific 70's Altman film.
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  #35  
Old 04-05-2012, 01:08 AM
Bang the Drum Slowly
Breezy
The China Syndrome
The Friends of Eddie Coyle
Marathon Man
Night Moves
North Dallas Forty
Phantasm
The Seven-ups
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  #36  
Old 04-06-2012, 10:08 PM
I watched King Of Marvin Gardens. It's not as good as Five Easy Pieces, but it's still a pretty damn good movie on it's own. The performances are great from everyone.

My most recent purchases include a few more 70's films.

They are Fat City, Smile, and Bring Me The Head Of Alfredo Garcia. I've already seen Fat City, but not the other two.
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  #37  
Old 04-07-2012, 06:16 PM
A masterpiece from the seventies that many people haven't seen: "Ryan's Daughter"!

A good French movie is "L'Histoire d'Adèle H."
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