#1  
Old 06-03-2013, 03:31 PM
Favorite Foreign Film Language

What language are most of your favorite foreign films in? French? Swedish? German? Russian? Spanish? Japanese? Korean? Hindi? Italian?

For me, because I've been really getting into Ingmar Bergman lately, it'd have to be Swedish. The Seventh Seal and The Virgin Spring are both in my top ten, making Bergman one of the few directors to have multiple films in my top ten at a given point (others include the Coen brothers, Martin Scorsese, and Francis Ford Coppola).


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  #2  
Old 06-03-2013, 06:22 PM
I'd probably pick either Italian or Japanese. I like many Fellini, Rossellini, and de Sica films in Italian as well as Kurosawa and Ozu in Japanese. Those five would probably all be in my top 25 or so favorite directors.

If I absolutely have to choose one I guess I'll go with Japanese just barely over Italian.
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  #3  
Old 06-03-2013, 08:51 PM
French would be my number one followed by Japanese. My Top Ten alone includes two french films and two japanese films.
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  #4  
Old 06-03-2013, 10:58 PM
Using the semi-unscientific-but-close-enough guide of how many films of a given language are in my all-time top 100 or, if not in the top 100, are the best of their given year, I get the following for those with 2 or more:

1.) French - 17 ½ (Quite the clear winner)
Blood of A Poet (1932) Jean Cocteau
Children of Paradise (1945) Marcel Carne
Day for Night (1974) Francois Truffaut

Diary of A Country Priest (1951) Robert Bresson
The Discreet Charm of The Bourgeoisie (1972) Luis Bunuel
Diva (1982) Jean-Jacques Beneix
The 400 Blows (1959) Francois Truffaut
Grand Illusion (1937) Jean Renoir
L’Atalante (1934) Jean Vigo
Last Year at Marienbad (1961) Alain Resnais
Le Fils (2002) Jean-Pierre & Luc Dardenne
Pierrot Le Fou (1965) Jean-Luc Godard
Playtime (1967) Jacques Tati
The Rules of The Game (1939) Jean Renoir
Weekend (1967) Jean-Luc Godard
Z (1969) Costa-Gavras
The Battle of Algiers (1966) Gillo Pontecorvo – ½

The Conformist (1970) Bernardo Bertolucci – ½
Last Tango in Paris (1973) Bernardo Bertolucci – ½


2.) Japanese - 8
Ikiru (1952) Akira Kurosawa
The Only Son (1936) Yasujiro Ozu
Rashomon (1950) Akira Kurosawa
Sansho The Bailiff (1954) Kenji Mizoguchi
Seven Samurai (1954) Akira Kurosawa
Tokyo Story (1953) Yasujiro Ozu

Ugetsu (1953) Kenji Mizoguchi
A Woman in The Dunes (1964) Hiroshi Teshigahara

3.) Italian – 7
8 1/2 (1963) Federico Fellini
Gomorrah (2008) Matteo Garrone
The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly (1966) Sergio Leone
The Leopard (1963) Luchino Visconti

Nights of Cabiria (1957) Federico Fellini
Umberto D (1952) Vittorio De Sica
The Battle of Algiers (1966) Gillo Pontecorvo – ½
The Conformist (1970) Bernardo Bertolucci – ½

4.) Swedish - 6
Cries and Whispers (1972) Ingmar Bergman
Fanny and Alexander (1983) Ingmar Bergman
Persona (1966) Ingmar Bergman
Scenes From A Marriage (1974) Ingmar Bergman
The Sacrifice (1986) Andrei Tarkovsky
Wild Strawberries (1957) Ingmar Bergman


5.) German - 5 (tied)
Aguirre: The Wrath of God (1972) Werner Herzog
Europa (1992) Lars Von Trier
Kings of The Road (1976) Wim Wenders

Olympia (1938) Leni Riefenstahl
The White Ribbon (2009) Michael Haneke

5.) Spanish – 5 (tied)
Che (2008) Steven Soderbergh
The Exterminating Angel (1961) Luis Bunuel
Hour of The Furnaces (1968) Fernando E. Solanas
Memories of Underdevelopment (1968) Tomás Gutiérrez Alea

Miss Bala (2011) Gerardo Naranjo

6.) Russian – 4
Alexandr Nevsky (1938) Sergei Eisenstein
Andrei Rublev (1966) Andrei Tarkovsky

Mirror (1975) Andrei Tarkovsky
Mother and Son (1998) Aleksandr Sokurov

7.) Bengali -3
Pather Panchali (1955) Satyajit Ray
Aparjito (1957) Satyajit Ray
Apur Sansur (1959) Satyajit Ray

8.) Chinese -2
A Brighter Summer Day (1993) Edward Yang
A Time to Live and A Time to Die (1986) Hou Hsiao-Hsien


*Top 100 titles in italics.

Last edited by QUENTIN; 06-03-2013 at 11:02 PM..
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  #5  
Old 06-04-2013, 01:51 AM
What makes something worth half a point? Does that mean its only partially in the given language?


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  #6  
Old 06-28-2013, 08:05 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by magjournal View Post
What makes something worth half a point? Does that mean its only partially in the given language?


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Sort of looks like it, but since Europa is at least half in English, it couldn't be unless he just doesn't count Europa. (Speaking of which: Watch Europa).

Also I am curious what you mean with this thread / its thesis. Whether you mean which language as part of the aesthetic experience is the most interesting when it comes to the phenomenological experience of film watchin', or whether you mean -- as the thread seems to have been taken -- which non-English language has produced the highest number of your favorite films.

Just as a curious aside, since you're still in High School, what language are you studying?

Last edited by Gordon; 06-28-2013 at 08:15 AM..
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  #7  
Old 06-28-2013, 09:50 AM
I'm ashamed to saw I havent seen a lot of the ones Quentin named off. And I call myself a film buff

Some of my favorites are

Oldboy
Audition
Frontiers
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  #8  
Old 06-28-2013, 11:29 AM
Quote:
What makes something worth half a point? Does that mean its only partially in the given language?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordon View Post
Sort of looks like it, but since Europa is at least half in English, it couldn't be unless he just doesn't count Europa. (Speaking of which: Watch Europa).
That was my intent, that it was partially but significantly in that foreign language. I guess it's been too long since I've seen Europa because I didn't remember it being primarily in English. I suppose that knocks it down half a point and puts Spanish above German and also means I should take that advice too and re-watch it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordon View Post
Also I am curious what you mean with this thread / its thesis. Whether you mean which language as part of the aesthetic experience is the most interesting when it comes to the phenomenological experience of film watchin', or whether you mean -- as the thread seems to have been taken -- which non-English language has produced the highest number of your favorite films.
?
Obviously I took it to mean the latter. I think that's what he was going for since he asked in his original post:

Quote:
Originally Posted by magjournal View Post
What language are most of your favorite foreign films in?
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  #9  
Old 06-28-2013, 01:48 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gordon View Post
Sort of looks like it, but since Europa is at least half in English, it couldn't be unless he just doesn't count Europa. (Speaking of which: Watch Europa).

Also I am curious what you mean with this thread / its thesis. Whether you mean which language as part of the aesthetic experience is the most interesting when it comes to the phenomenological experience of film watchin', or whether you mean -- as the thread seems to have been taken -- which non-English language has produced the highest number of your favorite films.

Just as a curious aside, since you're still in High School, what language are you studying?
The second. Which language are most of your favorite foreign films in? And I just finished high school, actually. I studied Spanish and American Sign Language, though I wasn't too amazing at either.


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