#1  
Old 11-15-2012, 03:05 PM
Silver Linings Playbook



SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK

Directed by David O. Russell

Written by David O. Russell, Based on the book by Matthew Quick

Starring Jennifer Lawrence, Bradley Cooper, Chris Tucker, and Robert DeNiro

Rated R for language and some sexual content/nudity

Running Time of 122 Minutes


After a stint in a mental institution, former teacher Pat Solitano moves back in with his parents and tries to reconcile with his ex-wife. Things get more challenging when Pat meets Tiffany, a mysterious girl with problems of her own.

I'll be see the film tonight and I've very excited. I love Jennifer and much of O. Russell's work, and this looks like a smart and somewhat dark romantic comedy which we rarely see anymore. This is another film with strong Oscar potential.

Last edited by SpikeDurden; 11-16-2012 at 01:32 AM..
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  #2  
Old 11-15-2012, 03:18 PM
I saw it a few weeks ago at an advance screening and I adored it. It's the best film of the year so far (and I expect it to stay that way unless Les Miserables takes my top stop, which is possible). It's a wonderful, hysterical and moving film and all the performances are top notch. Jennifer Lawrence will win the Oscar this year for sure.

I wouldn't exactly call this movie "dark" though. It's fairly light and humerus. I would compare it to Jerry Maguire.
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  #3  
Old 11-15-2012, 09:24 PM
Saw it at TIFF and loved it. It's predictable, sure, but the thing that separates it from other romantic comedies is that its characters aren't one dimensional idiots. I just loved watching these people interact. I love how Cooper's character can be jogging down the street with a garbage bag over him and Lawrence's character questions it, but kind of just doesn't give a fuck. These two characters have an unspoken understanding of each other, which I found made the film pretty powerful, even if it is relatively light. I also liked how instead of Cooper having to adjust to everyone around him, they come to accept him for who he is. He may be a little nutty and will throw the occasional Hemingway book out the window, but he's ultimately pretty harmless unless you bang his wife or make fun of an Asian person.

Acting wise, the performances are great across the board. Lawrence has been getting the most praise, and while I agree, I think Cooper is right up there with her. I can't remember the last on screen couple who were this compulsively watchable. De Niro also gives his best performance in at least a decade.

Last edited by Bourne101; 11-15-2012 at 09:30 PM..
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  #4  
Old 11-15-2012, 10:24 PM
Love the cast, love the director, love the trailer. It takes place and was filmed in Philadelphia. Apparently the Eagles play an important part of the story which I think is kind of cool even though I'm not into sports. Can't wait to see it.
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  #5  
Old 11-16-2012, 12:50 AM

I'm really looking forward to this. The unique and extremely talented cast is there, the many times proven (imo, of course) amazing writer/director is there, the excellent early reviews and building buzz are there, and for once I am not feeling over saturated or annoyed by the "pre-hype" at all and can definitely say that as soon as I see a showing near me, I'll be there.
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  #6  
Old 11-16-2012, 09:45 AM
Not the kind of girl that is into rom-com's or drama's that much, but I am considering seeing this.

Even in the trailer it is quite remarkable that a 22-year old Jennifer Lawrence is getting away with playing this character, but Bradley Cooper completely blew me away. Ever since Alias I thought he was 'gonna make it'. Good for him.
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  #7  
Old 11-16-2012, 10:17 AM
From the great reviews sounds like its worth the trip to 68th street
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  #8  
Old 11-16-2012, 06:59 PM
I was really hoping I'd like this one, however I did not at all. Lawrence (and DeNiro, to a lesser extent) is the shining spot in a tonally messy, contrived film lacking very little genuine humanity.

Working on a full review now.
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  #9  
Old 11-16-2012, 08:20 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDurden View Post
lacking very little genuine humanity.
I really don't agree with that. I'm interested in hearing you expand on this in your review.

Last edited by Bourne101; 11-16-2012 at 08:30 PM..
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  #10  
Old 11-16-2012, 09:38 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDurden View Post
I was really hoping I'd like this one, however I did not at all. Lawrence (and DeNiro, to a lesser extent) is the shining spot in a tonally messy, contrived film lacking very little genuine humanity.

Working on a full review now.
This just sort of bummed me out on this, as my only concern was that there might be a disconnect between the characters and what we can relate to as people in the real world, sympathetically speaking.

Bourne- You felt the complete opposite of that? I saw you really enjoyed it, and I havent heard really anything negative at all. I am still excited to check it out, but that is something that really bothers me lately- when characters designed to be grounded in reality (albeit a little off or edgy) that ultimately win you over or go through a major life change are just so out of touch with the reality of any person you would ever actually meet that it makes their whole journey ring false. The more intentionally quirky or off something appears to be, the more worried I become as quirkiness seems often mistaken and used to hide behind in exchange for, sharp wit these days. That, to me, generally points to a movie probably about things that would never matter to the average person right now. I really don't get that sense from this though.
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  #11  
Old 11-17-2012, 12:35 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by marilynMONROBOT View Post
Bourne- You felt the complete opposite of that? I saw you really enjoyed it, and I havent heard really anything negative at all. I am still excited to check it out, but that is something that really bothers me lately- when characters designed to be grounded in reality (albeit a little off or edgy) that ultimately win you over or go through a major life change are just so out of touch with the reality of any person you would ever actually meet that it makes their whole journey ring false. The more intentionally quirky or off something appears to be, the more worried I become as quirkiness seems often mistaken and used to hide behind in exchange for, sharp wit these days. That, to me, generally points to a movie probably about things that would never matter to the average person right now. I really don't get that sense from this though.
The film doesn't have these problems that you're worried about. There are some contrivances, as with any romantic comedy, but I didn't find the main character was completely out of touch with reality. He is to a degree, because he's just suffered some pretty severe trauma, but not in the sense that you mean. It's not really a quirky movie at all. It's legitimately sharp and witty, and also very honest. What I liked about it was that because both of the main characters have suffered pretty severe trauma, it puts them on common ground (i.e., it's not a completely levelheaded person being the savior of a nut). This makes them feel comfortable around each other and makes for very honest conversations, such as one scene where they have a back and forth about all of the antidepressants they have taken.

Last edited by Bourne101; 11-17-2012 at 01:04 AM..
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  #12  
Old 11-17-2012, 01:06 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bourne101 View Post
The film doesn't have these problems that you're worried about. There are some contrivances, as with any romantic comedy, but I didn't find the main character was completely out of touch with reality. He is to a degree, because he's just suffered some pretty severe trauma, but not in the sense that you mean. It's not really a quirky movie at all. It's legitimately sharp and witty, and also very honest. What I liked about it was that because both of the main characters have suffered pretty severe trauma, it puts them on common ground, which makes them feel comfortable around each other and makes for very honest conversations. There's one great scene near the beginning when they have a back and forth about all of the antidepressants they have taken. It feels very real and natural.
This is exactly what I hoped for when I first started hearing the early buzz. I have a feeling I will probably thoroughly enjoy it, I'm just always weary with how movies like this are handled, I feel quite a connection to these types of flicks when they are handled properly, but when they are over board hip, or intentionally edgy all the time I just get worn down by it all. Gonna go check this out tomorrow afternoon I believe, i'll report back my thoughts...Anyone else keep getting the names of this and The Perks of Being a Wallflower mixed up? I have been calling them both by the wrong name off and on since the TIFF reviews came in ha.
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  #13  
Old 11-17-2012, 01:58 AM
My full review:

If I had not seen (and enjoyed) films by David O. Russell before, I might have been convinced that this was his first time behind the camera. Silver Linings Playbook is a mishmash of tones and ideas ultimately more interested in being a “crowd pleaser” than something real. That last part’s okay; I’ll fully admit to being a sap and loving a well executed romantic comedy or happy ending. This is a film about silver linings and positive attitudes, after all, and I think we can reasonably expect going in that the resolution will be a good one. In fact, despite not quite making sense to me in terms of the headspace of our lead character, Bradley Cooper’s Pat Solitano, the ending did indeed leave a smile on my face. But much like the unconvincing way in which Pat arrives at his life-altering final decision, Silver Linings Playbook fails to possess a believable connective tissue or appropriate balance and thus never succesfully accomplishes anything it sets out to do.

It can be tricky to make a film about characters with mental illness that also wants to be a light, palatable film for audiences. The question becomes: how far and deep do you go? You don’t want to alienate the audience or make your characters too dark and unlikeable, nor do you want to gloss over the symptoms are ultimately end up lampooning these conditions, however subtle. I’m not quite sure Silver Linings ever finds this balance. His blue eyes piercing, his face bruised, his mouth moving an unfiltered mile-a-minute, Bradley’s portrayal of a hurt, “undiagnosed bipolar” man trying to get his life back together consists of a series of tics and gestures that never quite land. When Cooper is given the opportunity to cut the external vices to a minimum and dig a little deeper, he becomes entirely more soulful and real. Mostly, though, his good work is betrayed by the penchant to focus on quirks and mood swings and rude statements that the audience is ultimately supposed to find charming. This issue runs throughout the veins of the film: these are all damaged and sick characters in their own way, from Robert DeNiro’s impassioned, gambling-addicted, OCD father (DeNiro is as good as he’s been in 20 years) to John Ortiz’s Ronnie who’s stress and confusion and deep unhappiness is played for laughs. Much of this material made me wildly uncomfortable. If this is a comedy (however light or dark you want to say it is), I felt as if I was being tricked into laughing at these people instead of ever warming up to them or coming to love them.

Then there’s Tiffany. Jennifer Lawrence is the film’s greatest asset stuck in a character that is the film’s biggest problem. Lawrence is a phenomenal actress, beautiful enough to be considered an “It girl” but real enough to disappear into a role such as her Oscar-nominated work in Winter’s Bone. Tiffany is every bit as “crazy” as Pat (as the film so often reminds us), faced with intense grief and a downward spiral of sex addiction and bad behavior. Lawrence is acerbic and raw and achieves an honesty while always maintaing the strange humor of the situation, but she is betrayed by the film’s need to make everything all about Pat. We can say that this is a film wherein the man and the woman “save each other,” but instead Tiffany exists as some sort of strange and deranged idealization of the male fantasy, existing purely to help Pat reach his better place. This is a major issue; Tiffany and Pat are defined purely and singularly by their mental illnesses. There is very little to them beyond their singular goals created by their need to get better, and in the end the film chooses to be about Pat and not about Pat and Tiffany together.

David O. Russell’s filmmaking is sloppy and nonsensical, with a whipping camera and song choices and mild effects that have no substantial purpose. His stylistic choices overshadow any moment in which the film could have cut the quirky comedy and approached something more honest. It left my head confused as I wondered why the camera was spinning or tracking in that fashion. Composition and camera-work should feel purposeful and meaningful; this just calls unfortunate attention to itself. Like much of the film, it strikes as part of a misguided approach to find that balance between lovable and silly comedy and something resembling the edge of Russell’s earlier work. Characters spend a lot of time yelling and screaming at each other (the Solitano family dynamic reminds of the similarly shrill bantering of the Ward/Ecklund family in Russell’s The Fighter) in a tone that suggests we are supposed to find their craziness hilarious and endearing but instead just left me uncomfortable. Characters like Anupam Kher’s Doctor and Chris Tucker’s fellow mental patient Danny (thankfully Tucker is relatively restrained) are reduced to stereotypes, much like the film’s portrayal of Philadelphia and Eagles football culture. And the film has more contrivances that you can shake a stick at (apparently Dash Mihok’s Officer Keogh is the only police officer in Philadelphia.) Ultimately this matters very little when the film lacks any semblance of humanity. You can argue that this is a comedy or meant to be taken lightly, but the film itself argues that much of this should be taken seriously even if it never actually does.

Last edited by SpikeDurden; 11-17-2012 at 02:01 AM..
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  #14  
Old 11-17-2012, 10:37 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDurden View Post
but instead Tiffany exists as some sort of strange and deranged idealization of the male fantasy
Read Tom O'Neil and Sasha Stone much?

To call it "strange" and "deranged" is just silly to me. It's not like she's begging for sex and he's longing for it. When they meet they both relate to each other and see the similarities in each other, which is what pushes their relationship forward. You know, birds of a feather flock together and all that... the kind of stuff that pushes real and honest relationships forward. Maybe it's a fantasy of meeting someone who knows what she wants, and calls people out on their bullshit, but I don't think that's what you're implying. If it's a fantasy of meeting someone who is similar to you and can understand you, then that would stand for both characters.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDurden View Post
reduced to stereotypes, much like the film’s portrayal of Philadelphia and Eagles football culture.
That portrayal was actually pretty spot on.

Last edited by Bourne101; 11-17-2012 at 01:13 PM..
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  #15  
Old 11-17-2012, 01:42 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bourne101 View Post
Read Tom O'Neil and Sasha Stone much?

To call it "strange" and "deranged" is just silly to me. It's not like she's begging for sex and he's longing for it. When they meet they both relate to each other and see the similarities in each other, which is what pushes their relationship forward. You know, birds of a feather flock together and all that... the kind of stuff that pushes real and honest relationships forward. Maybe it's a fantasy of meeting someone who knows what she wants, and calls people out on their bullshit, but I don't think that's what you're implying. If it's a fantasy of meeting someone who is similar to you and can understand you, then that would stand for both characters.



That portrayal was actually pretty spot on.
****SPOILERS****

I lived in Philadelphia for much of my life and it struck the wrong chord with me. Regardless of that, Tiffany just seemed like another notch on the film female character list that exists only to serve to needs and desires of the male character and isn't really given a full arc or desires of her own. You could argue that she has her dance competition and Pat does this for her so she finally gets to live out one of her dreams, but Pat only does it for selfish reasons (not because he has any respect for Tiffany, at least not for most of the film) and in the end Tiffany gets drunk because she's upset Nikki showed up... once again it's all about Pat. I just kept feeling like I knew far more about Pat's issues and his life and his desires.

Lawrence very capably digs Tiffany out of her hole and makes her a much stronger character than she has any right to be, but Tiffany saves Pat, so to speak. They don't save each other. It felt very one-sided, which just seems so typical for what essentially amounts to another romantic comedy. And don't get me wrong, I don't really use that word in a derogatory fashion as I enjoy many romantic comedies over the years.

***END SPOILERS***

Anyways, I'm glad many are liking it but I hope I at least somewhat capably explained my reasons for not liking it. I'd be happy if Lawrence gets her Oscar nom, although I'd frankly be much happier if she received it for The Hunger Games, which absolutely won't happen. If Bradley Cooper ends up nominated though I'll be pretty shocked/upset.
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  #16  
Old 11-17-2012, 05:12 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDurden View Post
****SPOILERS****

I lived in Philadelphia for much of my life and it struck the wrong chord with me. Regardless of that, Tiffany just seemed like another notch on the film female character list that exists only to serve to needs and desires of the male character and isn't really given a full arc or desires of her own. You could argue that she has her dance competition and Pat does this for her so she finally gets to live out one of her dreams, but Pat only does it for selfish reasons (not because he has any respect for Tiffany, at least not for most of the film) and in the end Tiffany gets drunk because she's upset Nikki showed up... once again it's all about Pat. I just kept feeling like I knew far more about Pat's issues and his life and his desires.

Lawrence very capably digs Tiffany out of her hole and makes her a much stronger character than she has any right to be, but Tiffany saves Pat, so to speak. They don't save each other. It felt very one-sided, which just seems so typical for what essentially amounts to another romantic comedy. And don't get me wrong, I don't really use that word in a derogatory fashion as I enjoy many romantic comedies over the years.

***END SPOILERS***
Ugh. So she's another Manic Pixie Dream Girl? That's too bad. I was looking forward to this movie, since I like David O. Russell and Jennifer Lawrence. Though, granted, from watching the trailers, this was something I kinda feared about Lawrence's character...
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  #17  
Old 11-17-2012, 05:14 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squid Vicious View Post
Ugh. So she's another Manic Pixie Dream Girl?
No.
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  #18  
Old 11-17-2012, 06:55 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squid Vicious View Post
Ugh. So she's another Manic Pixie Dream Girl? That's too bad. I was looking forward to this movie, since I like David O. Russell and Jennifer Lawrence. Though, granted, from watching the trailers, this was something I kinda feared about Lawrence's character...
I didn't use those words. I don't really buy that concept, at least as specifically as the term has come to be used. But I do stand by what I said. Which is, again, my opinion. I'm in the minority here. This film is clearly well loved and is going to rack up award nominations over the coming months. So perhaps you'll love it! I hope you do.
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  #19  
Old 11-19-2012, 08:06 AM
Silver Linings Playbook may not be the first film about falling in love with someone who is mentally unstable ,but
at least it steers clear of the common theme of a character falling for someone who is mentally unstable,and they
write them off as being a little eccentric or a free spirit.Then the nervous breakdown comes,and suddenly the character
is dumbfounded,meets his new lovers family who informs him/her that the love of his/her life has been in and out of
psychiatric institutions for years.


Pat Solitano (Bradley Cooper in one of his best roles) is checked out of the psych ward by his loving mom (the great
Jacki Weaver) where he has been after assaulting his wife's lover.Pat is diagnosed as bipolar.He soon meets the newly widowed
Tiffany (Jennifer Lawrence) through his caving under the pressures of life friend Ronnie(John Ortiz) and Tiffany's
controlling sister Veronica (Julia Stiles). Pat is obssesed with regaining his wife's favor,and Tiffany says she can
help by being a mediator/messenger for him,but only if he agrees to be her partner in a dance competition.

There is a natural and true feel in many scenes in SLP. Losing a loved one especially a spouse can definitely
lead to a widow/widower to become sexually promiscuous,trying to fill a sudden void in their lives and Lawrence
tackles this persona with such ease she's a joy to watch and she's just a natural magnetic big screen presence
Also when Pat and Tiffany discuss the various medications they have taken,how a mental breakdown can come out of nowhere,
and can be downright scary and trying and frustrating experience for family members.The latter is wonderfully acted and displayed by
Robert De Niro as Pat's Philadelphia Eagles obssesed father.This is the liveliest Deniro has been on the big screen in years.

At times the comedy mixed with the serious subject matter doesnt work,and the script has some contrived moments here and there
and some familiar rom-com themes slip in.

In the end i applaud SLP for it's great ensemble cast which includes Chris Tucker as Pat's friend and fellow patient Danny,
for not conforming to the aforementioned theme,and its true view of mental illness.

Scale of 1-10 an 8
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  #20  
Old 11-20-2012, 12:32 AM
Great fucking movie. Earns everything it works for.
9/10
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  #21  
Old 11-23-2012, 05:47 PM
Terrific review by Mark Kermode:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rMIqrgVahAc
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  #22  
Old 11-24-2012, 03:29 PM
Review: Silver Linings Playbook - Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence prove the best relationships are the oddest. Silver Linings is one of the best films of the year as Cooper and Lawrence deliver career best performances - http://wp.me/p2CCWq-2np
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  #23  
Old 11-25-2012, 12:12 PM
Saw this last night and loved it. Every person in the movie was amazing. Cooper should earn a Nomination, and so should Lawrence and DeNiro.

Lawrence has always been in my top 5 hotties list, she may be moving up to number one, she looked amazing in this movie (and if you saw the pics of her from Leno this week... wow)

Just a great movie, David O'Russell knows how to direct, he hasnt made a movie I didnt love yet!
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  #24  
Old 12-13-2012, 04:34 PM
So, I liked this, but I didn't love it. It was certainly an acting showcase for the two leads, and the acting in general was solid all around. And although it was a unique take and genuinely funny, overall it was still a somewhat trite, touchy-feely, Hollywood-happy-ending kind of movie.

Spoiler:
The ending was pretty ridiculous all around.

They "won" the dance!

They fall in love! (He even chases after her!)

The family is all better and happy!

Dad won his bet, got his restaurant, and cured his OCD!!!


It's just frustrating, because I thought the movie did some things very well, and some things really sloppy and ham fisted.

7/10
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  #25  
Old 12-14-2012, 04:02 AM
It's a romcom about fucked up people. And then you have Robert De Niro playing character who is kind of fucked as well. What's not to love?
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  #26  
Old 12-17-2012, 01:46 PM
There is that “feel good” quality in David O. Russell’s latest film, and why shouldn’t there be? Most films have those three act structures of characters in a pretty dark place, find some sort of muse to take them out of their emotional or physical obstacle, and lead on to that road of predictable, sappy endings that make the audience cheer and leave with a big smile on their face. Russell seems to perfectly understand that role in certain types of cinema, and while Silver Linings tries to attain it’s own vision under the guise of fairly personal “dramedy” for some of the film’s screen time, there’s that compulsive need to fall back on that “feel good” route that doesn’t inherently hurt the film, but never making the film truly great either.

The main focus of the film is mental illness, and the effect that it can have on friends and family. That afflicted character is Pat (Bradley Cooper) who is let out of a mental institution after a violent outburst made him lose his wife and teaching job. Feeling the need to be on the road to recovery, he begins a plan to better himself, crossing roads with another damaged individual Tiffany (Jennifer Lawrence), as well as dealing with a rocky relationship with his mother (Jacki Weaver) and father (Robert DeNiro).

The first act of the film is probably the strongest aspect of Silver Linings, with Russell showing how deep the problems with Cooper’s Pat have really gotten, as well as how these problems could have originated through his home life. There’s this looseness in this part of the story, and Cooper really sells the emotions and pent up anger that Pat has been dealing with throughout his life. One particular breakdown regarding Pat is visceral and intense, really selling Pat’s mental illness and not having that aspect being played up as a quality for Pat’s character that could seem like a minor hindrance in other films that would deal with this type of theme.

The other strong aspect in the first act is Lawrence’s Tiffany, whose back-and-forth with Pat, and as another troubled character is really solid. Lawrence truly shines in this role, always bringing that off-kilter personality, but never forgetting that her character is emotionally damaged. She’s always on par with the other actors around her, never feeling diminished by the likes of Cooper and even Deniro. She simply sells her character in every way that she can, whether it calls to be subdued or aggressively manic.

The relationship of Pat and Tiffany is one of the main selling points of the film, and while the pairing seems like something that feels as artificially Hollywood that the script calls for, Cooper and Lawrence make the whole thing work. The whole feels organic for most of the film’s running time, never having times where the film has each of the characters reflect on their relationships to other characters, but rather letting the audience be smart enough to know that their chemistry is blooming every time that they are together.

But, while there’s this subtlety in Silver Lining Playbook, the film unfortunately seems very dead set to go down a road where there’s this huge conflict and that the characters need to work together to overcome that obstacle. Now, the main focal point of Pat and his mental illness is the obstacle in the Russell’s film, but another obstacle pops up in the film regarding Deniro’s character that just seemed out-of-place for a film that had a bit more looseness in how the characters connect and develop as people. Not to say that the film’s script loses the more subtle approach to how the main characters evolve as people, but now the film is under the third act portion of the script that is heart warming and many audiences will lap up, but doesn’t feel as authentic as the rest of the film felt.

But, while Silver Lining Playbook does lose its authenticity near the end, the film still has great direction and acting to somewhat elevate the predictable “feel good” qualities that Russell enjoys to implement in this film. There’s nothing thoroughly groundbreaking or amazing in this film, but a leisurely Saturday/Sunday night viewing for those interested will probably get the most out of David O Russell’s film.

7.5/10
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  #27  
Old 12-21-2012, 10:09 PM
I thought it was a nice film but wasn't as into it as other people. The one thing I definitely didn't like was Jennifer Lawrence. I think she needs to lose a 15 lbs....at least that much to be fit looking. On the other hand, I wouldn't have like Angelina Jolie in that role either...

I'm rooting for Bradley Cooper since he is one of the only non-Jewish white American actors they let make a film nowadays. that is outside of brad, Clooney, cruise, leo....etc.
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  #28  
Old 12-22-2012, 12:24 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by markbot View Post
I'm rooting for Bradley Cooper since he is one of the only non-Jewish white American actors they let make a film nowadays. that is outside of brad, Clooney, cruise, leo....etc.
lol
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  #29  
Old 12-23-2012, 01:58 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by markbot View Post
I thought it was a nice film but wasn't as into it as other people. The one thing I definitely didn't like was Jennifer Lawrence. I think she needs to lose a 15 lbs....at least that much to be fit looking. On the other hand, I wouldn't have like Angelina Jolie in that role either...
Wow...
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  #30  
Old 12-25-2012, 06:17 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moviefan02000 View Post
Wow...
I'm not saying Jennifer's fatness is the reason I don't like her in that role, although it doesn't help. I just don't like her as an actress as much as others. I didn't like her in hunger games or xmen either. She just didn't seem to fit those roles. In terms of looks, she has a bit or a round moon face, which I generally don't find attractive. I prefer oval faces w well defined features, not rounded features as she has.
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  #31  
Old 12-25-2012, 10:40 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by markbot View Post
I'm not saying Jennifer's fatness is the reason I don't like her in that role, although it doesn't help. I just don't like her as an actress as much as others. I didn't like her in hunger games or xmen either. She just didn't seem to fit those roles. In terms of looks, she has a bit or a round moon face, which I generally don't find attractive. I prefer oval faces w well defined features, not rounded features as she has.
One title: Winter's Bone.
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  #32  
Old 12-31-2012, 04:59 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpikeDurden View Post
I lived in Philadelphia for much of my life and it struck the wrong chord with me. Regardless of that, Tiffany just seemed like another notch on the film female character list that exists only to serve to needs and desires of the male character and isn't really given a full arc or desires of her own. You could argue that she has her dance competition and Pat does this for her so she finally gets to live out one of her dreams, but Pat only does it for selfish reasons (not because he has any respect for Tiffany, at least not for most of the film) and in the end Tiffany gets drunk because she's upset Nikki showed up... once again it's all about Pat. I just kept feeling like I knew far more about Pat's issues and his life and his desires.


This kind of reads like, "Sure you can say Tiffany has her own motivations but I don't because it doesn't fit my argument."

Your argument might be more convincing if her motivation was to get Pat back together with Nikki (which was Pat's motivation), but she had just as selfish as motivations as Pat.

Quote:
Anyways, I'm glad many are liking it but I hope I at least somewhat capably explained my reasons for not liking it. I'd be happy if Lawrence gets her Oscar nom, although I'd frankly be much happier if she received it for The Hunger Games, which absolutely won't happen. If Bradley Cooper ends up nominated though I'll be pretty shocked/upset.
Really? Hunger Games? Where she put on her best Kristen Stewart and snoozed her way through what should have been pretty exciting thriller? Yeesh! I think the only time she showed any emotion was when she volunteered.
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  #33  
Old 01-01-2013, 12:17 AM
I see now how that I was perhaps a bit overzealous with my estimation of the Tiffany character, and Jennifer Lawrence sure is terrific. I'd like to give this another viewing.

Last edited by SpikeDurden; 01-10-2013 at 03:40 PM..
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  #34  
Old 01-10-2013, 12:57 AM
Congratulations on the many Oscar nominations this film received. This is the first film since Reds to receive an acting nomination in all 4 categories.

Last edited by SpikeDurden; 01-10-2013 at 03:40 PM..
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  #35  
Old 01-11-2013, 12:11 PM
Saw this for a second time yesterday because of Jackie Weavers Oscar nomination. I loved her in Animal Kingdom where she owned one of the best characters ever and was looking forward to seeing her in future roles but aside for a small part in The Five Year Engagement this was the first time she showed up in anything. Going in for my first viewing I was excited that she was getting the chance to act in a movie with so much talent involved and had no doubt she would deliver. Walking out I was dissapointed that she was so wasted having nothing to do but stand in the background and make worried expressions. So when the nominations came out I was shocked to see her in there and frankly shocked to see the movie overall getting so much love. I mean it was great as far as romantic comedies go but that really isn't saying much.

So this time I obviously payed close attention to her performance and in my opinion her nomination was easily the least deserving of the year. She has like four lines in the whole movie and they all come in the first quarter. She doesn't have one single Oscar moment and it left me wondering how much of her character was left on the cutting room floor. I'm not saying she was bad, she actually did do as much as she could with just her eyes and expressions but she just wasn't given anything to do. The role itself was just undeserving of her talents and thus the nomination was also undeserving. I'm still waiting for a proper follow-up to her absolutely deserved nomination for Animal Kingdom.

As for the movie itself, it is a very good movie but not a great one. No one directs crazy like David O Russell. The Fighter, I Heart Huckabees, and especially Flirting With Disaster are fucking awesome examples of this. Silver Linings Playbook is better than Huckabees but not on the level of his others in my opinion. I think his best is still Flirting With Disaster followed by The Fighter, Three Kings, Silver Linings Playbook, I Heart Huckabees and Spanking The Monkey, in that order. Silver Linings' ending just wound up too much like a typical rom-com for me to think of it a a great movie including the dance contest where everyone in the story (even thier own personal police officer?) shows up to cheer them on.

One problem I had even on first viewing is Jennifer Lawrence's character's psychic abilities. First when they get in a fight in front of the movie theatre(playing Midnight Meat Train, funny) and the only cop in Philly shows up, she somehow knows that his wedding song is playing in his head. Granted he mentions earlier in the film that he hears it sometimes even when it's not playing but how does she know it's the song and not the crazy situation they are in that is freaking him out. Later when he gets in a fight at the game, she is seen sitting in her dance studio waiting for him she gets up, storms out and storms into his house. Nobody mentions a fight or anything that happened that day and she somehow knows everything, yelling at DiNiro that the fight is all his fault. Maybe she called someone on the way over and got the story, I guess. Not a big problem but bothered me anyway.

Again, I liked it but there were too many typical rom-com conveniences for me to think of it as a great, Best Picture type of movie.
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  #36  
Old 01-19-2013, 10:22 PM
Was finally able to see this tonight and I had a really good time with it. My favorite part of the movie besides the great chemistry between Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence was Robert De Niro who I thought had a great role. I thought it had just the right amount of humor as well as drama. Probably one of my favorite movies from 2012. 9/10

Last edited by ThunderStorm; 01-22-2013 at 01:12 PM..
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  #37  
Old 01-20-2013, 11:29 PM
It's such a shame with this movie..

I saw it again yesterday, and there is a point where things take such a wild turn into a formulaic, contrived story that all of the potential it was building up for a good hour and some change turns the expectation of a mountain into the reality of a molehill. I'm trying to pin the exact point when this happens, but so far I haven't found exactly what it is.

There are things the second time around I've noticed with refreshed eyes, and they shine a little brighter. In other words, Lawrence's performance. It's got nice subtleties, she's naturally striking enough to make some frames look like masterpieces and I really do love her in that scene with De Niro even though the film is unfortunately mid-spiraling toward nauseating vanilla backwash by that point. Lapses of judgement come after Tiffany and Pat meet, after their jogging and right after their first date that's not a date but then it gets worse and worse, where finally we have the big brother knowing things he's not supposed to, sappy scenes placed strategically, the way the bet is made where all of a sudden this dance makes all the difference and so on. Until that ending, where only Lawrence is fantastic, getting no help from anything or anyone else. Even Cooper had left the building by that point.

I still have no clue why Weaver is nominated, but the other three all deserve their nomination. The potential of having a bit of a more serious look into bi-polarism and getting into a bit more darker comedy was scrapped for a conventionally average conclusion. Unlike the film's dance contest, being average isn't a winner.

Leave it to Harvey Weinstein to squeeze it for as many Oscars as possible, and making it look like a threat in a year that's well above average.

7/10
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  #38  
Old 01-21-2013, 02:16 AM
It is currently my #3 film of 2012 (behind Les Miserables and The Perks of Being a Wallflower) and even though I slightly prefer Les Mis, I almost wish this would end up snagging Best Picture. It's such a wonderful film and it's quite deserving. It's great when a movie makes you feel THIS GOOD.
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  #39  
Old 01-21-2013, 03:50 AM
I had a look at the trailer and l didn't like it very much but l have been told it has had a good review so l might still have a look also it has a Aussie star in it Jackie weaver
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  #40  
Old 01-21-2013, 06:17 AM
Great movie , I loved how everyone in this movie belonged in a looney hospital.
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