#1401  
Old 05-15-2006, 03:23 AM
Bob Dylan: Chronicles, Volume One
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  #1402  
Old 05-15-2006, 01:26 PM
So Long and Thanks For All the Fish - Douglas Adams
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  #1403  
Old 05-16-2006, 06:57 PM
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  #1404  
Old 05-18-2006, 02:17 PM
the

Last edited by andrew33; 10-20-2007 at 02:09 PM..
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  #1405  
Old 05-18-2006, 10:52 PM
Blood on the Moon by James Ellroy
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  #1406  
Old 05-22-2006, 09:06 PM
the

Last edited by andrew33; 10-20-2007 at 02:07 PM..
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  #1407  
Old 05-23-2006, 05:58 PM
Mark Z. Danielewski's House of Leaves (again)
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  #1408  
Old 05-30-2006, 08:39 PM
Easy Riders, Raging Bulls: How the Sex-Drugs-and-Rock 'N' Roll Generation Saved Hollywood by Peter Biskind

A little over 50 pages in and it's fantastic. Well written and full of awesome real life occurences and dialogue exchanges. A real page turner.
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  #1409  
Old 05-31-2006, 07:20 PM
The Mermaid Chair - Sue Monk Kidd

After reading her first great story, The Secret Life of Bees, I was interested in her next book. It has the same great attention to detail and imagery that was so prevalant in Bees, but I haven't really gotten into the tone of the story as much as I thought I would (it's easily digestible, though).
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  #1410  
Old 05-31-2006, 10:40 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by Andrew Ratto

So I took that back to the librarium and I took out Nausea by Jean-Paul Sartre. I've reached page 25 and so far it's really fucking boring. Just meandering around Paris complaining. But I can relate to the feelings he describes, as I've experienced something similar in the past. Not sure what this book means, but chances are I won't finish it.
Nausea fucking rocks.
Sartre rocks.
Yes.
Not more to say than that.
The Wall is awesome Sartre too.
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  #1411  
Old 06-01-2006, 10:16 PM


Enchanter by Sara Douglass

Very good book so far. Ten times better than the first in the series.
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  #1412  
Old 06-06-2006, 06:53 AM
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  #1413  
Old 06-07-2006, 10:56 AM
Rose Madder by Stephen King
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  #1414  
Old 06-08-2006, 07:19 PM
The Last of The Mohicans

-James Cooper

Last edited by silentasylum; 06-23-2006 at 11:50 AM..
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  #1415  
Old 06-11-2006, 09:11 AM
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  #1416  
Old 06-12-2006, 12:19 AM
Currently reading The Omen, should finish it by tomorrow. Then I'll pick The Shining back up and finish it and then commence with re-reading The Exorcist.
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  #1417  
Old 06-12-2006, 08:03 AM
Just finished: Deception Point by Dan Brown
In the Midst Of: One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez
Just Started: Nightmares & Dreamscapes by Stephen King
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  #1418  
Old 06-12-2006, 01:52 PM
Spielbergo, how do you like the Marquez?
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  #1419  
Old 06-12-2006, 02:11 PM
I'm really enjoying his writing so far, very simplistic and not overly techincal. I also like the integration of magical elements within the storyline.
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  #1420  
Old 06-14-2006, 02:55 PM
Gerald's Game - Stephen King
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  #1421  
Old 06-14-2006, 03:46 PM
Friday the 13th--Carnival of Maniacs.


...What are you looking at? Yes, I read novels based on my favorite slasher series. It's a guilty pleasure.
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  #1422  
Old 06-14-2006, 04:37 PM
IT by Stephen King. I'm flying through the pages.
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  #1423  
Old 06-16-2006, 04:18 PM
The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon - Stephen King
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  #1424  
Old 06-16-2006, 09:03 PM
"Sabbath's Theater" by Philip Roth
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  #1425  
Old 06-17-2006, 04:41 PM
I just picked up "New Rules: Polite Musing from a Timid Observer" by Bill Maher. I'm enjoying it so far.
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  #1426  
Old 06-18-2006, 10:17 PM
The Devil Wears Prada - Lauren Weisberger
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  #1427  
Old 06-21-2006, 01:17 AM
The Wastelands: The Dark Tower III - Stephen King

Call me mustard 'n mayonnaise, 'cause I'm on a roll...
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  #1428  
Old 06-25-2006, 07:35 PM
The Stranger - Albert Camus

I need a bit of a respite from the lengthy Dark Tower books.
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  #1429  
Old 06-25-2006, 09:42 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by Lazy Boy
The Stranger - Albert Camus

I need a bit of a respite from the lengthy Dark Tower books.
You've read it before, right?
If not, then you're in for a treat.
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  #1430  
Old 06-26-2006, 12:42 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by dman476
You've read it before, right?
If not, then you're in for a treat.
Never read it before. None of my classes have featured it, so this is something new for me. Sounds interesting.

I want to up my reading status quo if I ever take part in a literary convention or invoke a discussion over a game of backgammon.

I'm so behind on these authors, it's amazing...
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  #1431  
Old 06-26-2006, 07:11 AM
Rich Dad, Poor Dad by Robert Kiyosaki.
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  #1432  
Old 06-26-2006, 01:00 PM
Franny and Zooey - J.D. Salinger
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  #1433  
Old 06-26-2006, 10:43 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by Lazy Boy
Never read it before. None of my classes have featured it, so this is something new for me. Sounds interesting.

I want to up my reading status quo if I ever take part in a literary convention or invoke a discussion over a game of backgammon.

I'm so behind on these authors, it's amazing...
Well, you should have fun reading the Stranger.
It is, after all, a classic.
I actually liked the Plague more, but whatever.
And yes, I'm assuming that the Stranger is considered the cut-off for competent literary intelligence.
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  #1434  
Old 06-26-2006, 10:54 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by dman476
And yes, I'm assuming that the Stranger is considered the cut-off for competent literary intelligence.
Whew! (wipes sweat off brow)

Me fail English? That's unpossible!

I want to be more like, Camus can do, but Sartre is smart-re. (cue gong)
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  #1435  
Old 06-27-2006, 01:03 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by Lazy Boy
Whew! (wipes sweat off brow)

Me fail English? That's unpossible!

I want to be more like, Camus can do, but Sartre is smart-re. (cue gong)
Camus is through, Sartre is the one to do.
Read No Exit, or the Flies,
You'll be English samurais

Ok, well, enough with my stupidity at least, Sartre is awesome.
Much more interesting than Camus, although his Myth of Sisyphus should be interesting when I get a chance to read it.
Have you read any Sartre?

And I was angry when my Philosophy class didn't have any existential work like Waiting for Godot...oh wait, they had No Exit but I'd read that before so it wasn't nearly as fun.
Oh well ttyl?
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  #1436  
Old 06-27-2006, 01:16 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by dman476
Ok, well, enough with my stupidity at least, Sartre is awesome.
Much more interesting than Camus, although his Myth of Sisyphus should be interesting when I get a chance to read it.
Have you read any Sartre?

And I was angry when my Philosophy class didn't have any existential work like Waiting for Godot...oh wait, they had No Exit but I'd read that before so it wasn't nearly as fun.
Oh well ttyl?
I've never read Sartre, and I'm basically discovering Camus. Pretty soon I'll be clucking my tongues with the masters, having a cigar over a discussion of Wittgenstein.

I just bought a shitload of used books from the library, and both authors were in there. I'm also trying out a little Bertolt Brecht (The Threepenny Opera), since that particular work is said to be a major influence for Lars von Trier when he made Dogville.

This summer, I am READING. Does that say how sorry I find the current state of cinema?

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  #1437  
Old 06-27-2006, 07:49 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by Lazy Boy
I've never read Sartre, and I'm basically discovering Camus. Pretty soon I'll be clucking my tongues with the masters, having a cigar over a discussion of Wittgenstein.

I just bought a shitload of used books from the library, and both authors were in there. I'm also trying out a little Bertolt Brecht (The Threepenny Opera), since that particular work is said to be a major influence for Lars von Trier when he made Dogville.

This summer, I am READING. Does that say how sorry I find the current state of cinema?

Oh well, yes.
Last I visited a Borders, I got 10 books, but alas, I cannot read any of them. I'm busy with the stupid summer semester until August.

Book ho for me. I'd be READING too, but I can't.
I'm very sad by this but whatever.
Brecht is someone I've wanted to read too, it'll be a while.
But Sartre I reccomend wholly, check him out as soon as you can.
He's great.
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  #1438  
Old 06-28-2006, 07:17 PM
Reading The Talented Mr. Riply by Patricia Highsmith
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  #1439  
Old 06-28-2006, 10:38 PM
The Dark Tower IV: Wizard and Glass - Stephen King
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  #1440  
Old 06-29-2006, 11:14 PM
"Gravity's Rainbow" by Thomas Pynchon
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