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  #481  
Old 02-07-2006, 02:12 AM


8/10

I put this one down at around the 200-page mark last summer and picked it up again on Saturday night. Just finished it and I am surprised at how much I ended up liking it. My main complaint is that while it is okay that the characters are flawed, some of them are just downright annoying, mainly Eddie. The last chapter almost makes up for how weak he is, and almost justifies it, but I still can't stand his character. At first I felt distanced from Ruth, but along with Harry I ended up enjoying their time in the book. The whole section in Amsterdam about the Red Light District was a phenomenal read. Not as good as The World According to Garp, but good enough to keep me interested in reading more Irving.

Book to start tomorrow: Glamorama by Bret Easton Ellis
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  #482  
Old 02-07-2006, 10:14 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by Rated R


8/10

I put this one down at around the 200-page mark last summer and picked it up again on Saturday night. Just finished it and I am surprised at how much I ended up liking it. My main complaint is that while it is okay that the characters are flawed, some of them are just downright annoying, mainly Eddie. The last chapter almost makes up for how weak he is, and almost justifies it, but I still can't stand his character. At first I felt distanced from Ruth, but along with Harry I ended up enjoying their time in the book. The whole section in Amsterdam about the Red Light District was a phenomenal read. Not as good as The World According to Garp, but good enough to keep me interested in reading more Irving.

Book to start tomorrow: Glamorama by Bret Easton Ellis
I thought the book was alright, with some intruiging moments, especially the car crash, and some extremely memorable moments.
I liked the last half like most people do, and was hoping DOOR IN THE FLOOR would be good enough to warrant a sequel, seeing as how that established the first half rather nicely (even though I didn't like the movie that much).

I suggest THE FOURTH HAND, which of the four Irving novels I've read, I loved it. A lot.
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  #483  
Old 02-08-2006, 01:16 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by KcMsterpce
I thought the book was alright, with some intruiging moments, especially the car crash, and some extremely memorable moments.
I liked the last half like most people do, and was hoping DOOR IN THE FLOOR would be good enough to warrant a sequel, seeing as how that established the first half rather nicely (even though I didn't like the movie that much).

I suggest THE FOURTH HAND, which of the four Irving novels I've read, I loved it. A lot.
I will add The Fourth Hand to my long list of books to read. Interesting story, my uncle has a copy of The World According to Garp that he lent to my mother and that is also when I happened to read it. When I first opened it I saw an inscription to my uncle by John Irving. Now I cannot remember what it said, and since then I have forgotten to ask him if he got it signed at a book signing or if he's actually met him and knows him. It's entirely possible either way, my uncle is a lawyer and does a lot of travelling and has been back and forth to Toronto where Irving holds a residence. So who knows, I will have to ask him.

Also Kc, have you read Garp? Just curious because I was wondering your thoughts on it as it is easily my favourite book I've read.
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  #484  
Old 02-08-2006, 08:30 PM
I haven't read GARP yet, but it's on my long list of books to read

I love the movie, even if it's nothing like the book, I don't care, it's excellent.
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  #485  
Old 02-11-2006, 01:16 PM

Great Book. I recommend to anyone.

9/10
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  #486  
Old 02-14-2006, 04:33 AM
STONE OF TEARS by Terry Goodkind - 7/10

Still a good read, but once again, the last 100 pages leave NO surprises for me, and I knew where things were going. I have a feeling Goodkind has no balls, and won't kill off our main characters; ever. If I'm wrong, then I'd love to keep reading.
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  #487  
Old 02-19-2006, 12:00 AM
Just finished Dark Tower V: Wolves of the Calla by Stephen King.

7.5

This was a very enjoyable read. It was very well written. The story was very much in the vain of The Magnificant Seven, which is what King was going for.
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  #488  
Old 02-19-2006, 11:35 PM
Started yesterday and finished today:

The Dark Tower VI: Song of Susannah

5.5/10

A let down after Wolves of the Calla. King focused on a lot things that were unnecessay in this book. A mediocre read after the previous couple of volumes.
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  #489  
Old 02-20-2006, 12:51 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by The Young Son
Started yesterday and finished today:

The Dark Tower VI: Song of Susannah

5.5/10

A let down after Wolves of the Calla. King focused on a lot things that were unnecessay in this book. A mediocre read after the previous couple of volumes.
You're right. Prepare yourself for book 7, though. It kicks ass!
You'll be like, "King, just rip my heart right out of my chest, stomp on it, put it back IN My chest, rip it out, and stomp all over it again, will ya?!

"Thank you, may I have another?!"
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  #490  
Old 02-20-2006, 01:24 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by zombievictim

Great Book. I recommend to anyone.

9/10
Honestly?
I read it a while ago but I wasn't impressed. Hadon's writing is freaking annoying to me and some of the details just astounded me by how ridiculously in bad taste they were.
Autism is made ridiculous by this trite novel, honestly, I don't see what's so great about it. In the beggining I loved it, and by the end I was distant from it. 6/10.

The Thief of Always - 8/10
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  #491  
Old 02-24-2006, 02:39 PM
I finished Catwoman 52, Green Lantern 9 and final Wonder Woman in preparation for next weeks Infinite Crisis #5. All were good, especially GL 9 which featured a great backn' forth between Hal and Batman, and featured batman trying out the power ring at Hal's pushing. Great moment. Catwoman 52 ended with Selina killing Black Mask (shockingly) and ended with her being sucked into the Multiverse White Hole like most other heroes have been on the final page of their respective books (Superman, Batman, JSA Classified, etc).
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  #492  
Old 02-27-2006, 06:57 PM
Finished The Dark Tower VII: The Dark Tower.

7/10

A good read. Some very enjoyable bits throughout. Not a fantastic read, but WOW!! What an ending!! As I read the last few pages I could see where it was going, and when King finally threw the last line of the book at me I just marvelled at the genius of it! Best ending to a book, EVER!

I was wondering if the whole series was worth the read. I guess it was, but book7 was worth it for the ending alone.
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  #493  
Old 03-01-2006, 10:45 PM
BLOOD OF THE FOLD by Terry Goodkind - 3/10

Someone please help me out here. Should I read the next one?

***** VERY MINOR SPOILERS (not a big deal, imo) *****

The first book was great (8.5/10), and the second alright (7/10), but this one just BLEW! First of all, if you're just starting to read the third chapter in a series, then you're an idiot. So, there's no reason to be giving background information every other page on what's happened in the last books, meanwhile stopping the story short in its' tracks and ruining the flow of the present situation(s).
Second of all, it's even WORSE to start retreading dialogue over and over again and also giving reminder paragraphs near the end of the book about things that happened IN THIS BOOK NEAR THE BEGINNING!
Once again there are 'visions' that give a false pretense to the conclusion (big surprise) and yet still fulfills the premonitions. Bleh.
The Blood of the Fold... their general... stupid as FUCK! Do we really need such a lamebrained and fanatical zealot that goes beyond cliche into absolute retardedness? I don't think so. But it happens!
Yeah, yeah Kahlan, Zed and Richard are separated again. I really didn't expect them to meet again until the end of the story. NOT!
Richard does the stupidest things now. He did dumb shit in book two, but not as far out as knowing that dabbling with magic he doesn't understand does nothing but FUCK SHIT UP in a bad way. Yet he STILL DOES IT!
Every other page Kahlan says, "It's for Richard. I miss Richard. I love Richard. I need Richard."
Every other page Richard says, "I hope Kahlan understands. This is for Kahlan. I love Kahlan. I miss Kahlan. I hope Kahlan understands."
Once again, Goodkind has to re-iterate what all the readers should already know. How many times were we reminded of the rules of the unconditional surrender? How many times do we get reminded about who has and doesn't have subtractive magic?
The repetitive dialogue. In three paragraphs they say what should have been established in two sentences.
It goes on and on...
I really don't get how bad this has gotten since the first book. Should I keep reading, or just stop? Has anyone else read these?
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  #494  
Old 03-05-2006, 08:32 PM
Atlantis by David Gibbons.

6/10

I was expecting this book to be an adventure that opens up the wonderful and rich world of Atlantis. However instead of advanced technology and lost civilizations being found, it takes a more realistic approach. A bit of a let down, however there were some pretty good action sequences in some spots. The writing is extremely annoying for most of the book, due to the fact that the author is a qualified Marine Archeologist and it is his first book. He drowns the reader in references to obscure history and expects them to know what he is talking about, explaining everything in no way at all. Not a bad read, but could have been a lot better.
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  #495  
Old 03-22-2006, 12:30 AM
Seven Ancient Wonders by Matthew Reilly.

9/10


A very solid book. Loads of action crossed with Indiana Jones-type trap temples. This is the best Reilly book I have read so far after having read all of them. Well worth the read.
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  #496  
Old 03-25-2006, 02:47 PM
A Scanner Darkly by Philip K. Dick

I absoutly loved the ending. It was just perfect and not too heavy handed at all. I'm very much looking forward to the movie; hopefully Rich Linklater can pull it off.
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  #497  
Old 03-28-2006, 12:02 AM
The World According to Garp - 8/10
It is Irving's best novel (that I've read), beating out The Fourth Hand.
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  #498  
Old 04-08-2006, 08:07 PM
I read Preacher Volumes 4-9 this week.
Just finished it.

It was awesome! 9/10
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  #499  
Old 04-25-2006, 06:57 PM
Angels and Demons

Kind of gets a little far-fetched, but I thought it was a good read.
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  #500  
Old 04-28-2006, 08:38 AM
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  #501  
Old 04-29-2006, 08:31 PM
The Crying Lot of 49 - 6/10

Great concept, but I dislike Pynchon's writing manner in this novel.
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  #502  
Old 04-30-2006, 05:06 PM
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  #503  
Old 04-30-2006, 11:32 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by dman476
The Crying Lot of 49 - 6/10

Great concept, but I dislike Pynchon's writing manner in this novel.

I read that, and didn't really get it. I'll have to take another shot at it again some time. Have you read any of his other stuff?
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  #504  
Old 05-01-2006, 12:14 PM
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  #505  
Old 05-01-2006, 12:57 PM
Orson Scott Card - Ender's Shadow
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  #506  
Old 05-01-2006, 06:03 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by bluesbrother965
I read that, and didn't really get it. I'll have to take another shot at it again some time. Have you read any of his other stuff?
I started reading Pynchon's V but I just kind of dropped it.
I want to start reading it again though.
The way he writes is a bit incohesive and it's easy to get lost.
He's not my favorite writer judging by The Crying Lot but I will get to more of his stuff sometime. 'Lot' is a hard book to get into, despite its minimal length. Vonnegut and Salinger rock as satirists and are among my favorites. Having said that, I could bee making a hasty statement about Pynchon. Have you read anything else of his? I'm curious to see what people besides me think of Pynchon because I have a few friends who adore him.
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  #507  
Old 05-01-2006, 06:35 PM
The World is Flat- Thomas Friedman
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  #508  
Old 05-01-2006, 06:44 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by Lost in Space
The World is Flat- Thomas Friedman
Must have taken quite some time, huh?
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  #509  
Old 05-01-2006, 07:02 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by dman476
I started reading Pynchon's V but I just kind of dropped it.
I want to start reading it again though.
The way he writes is a bit incohesive and it's easy to get lost.
He's not my favorite writer judging by The Crying Lot but I will get to more of his stuff sometime. 'Lot' is a hard book to get into, despite its minimal length. Vonnegut and Salinger rock as satirists and are among my favorites. Having said that, I could bee making a hasty statement about Pynchon. Have you read anything else of his? I'm curious to see what people besides me think of Pynchon because I have a few friends who adore him.

I have a good friend (in fact, he used to post around here, and actually showed me this website) who loves Pynchon, he's the one who told me about him. I also know some adults who think he's a brilliant writer. Gravity's Rainbow is supposed to be his masterpiece, but far from his most accessible. It regularly makes it on to Top 100 book lists. From what I gather, it's best to read and make sure you understand Crying of Lot 49, V, and maybe Slow Learner (short stories compilation) before taking a shot at Gravity's Rainbow. Like I said, I got kinda lost in Crying of Lot 49, and definitely plan on reading V and maybe re-reading Lot 49 before even attempting Gravity's Rainbow. I've also considered trying Vineland. I love Vonnegut, Breakfast of Champions is in my top five or so books. All I've read by Salinger is Catcher, I've heard Franny and Zooey and Nine Stories are good, as well.
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  #510  
Old 05-01-2006, 09:44 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by bluesbrother965
I have a good friend (in fact, he used to post around here, and actually showed me this website) who loves Pynchon, he's the one who told me about him. I also know some adults who think he's a brilliant writer. Gravity's Rainbow is supposed to be his masterpiece, but far from his most accessible. It regularly makes it on to Top 100 book lists. From what I gather, it's best to read and make sure you understand Crying of Lot 49, V, and maybe Slow Learner (short stories compilation) before taking a shot at Gravity's Rainbow. Like I said, I got kinda lost in Crying of Lot 49, and definitely plan on reading V and maybe re-reading Lot 49 before even attempting Gravity's Rainbow. I've also considered trying Vineland. I love Vonnegut, Breakfast of Champions is in my top five or so books. All I've read by Salinger is Catcher, I've heard Franny and Zooey and Nine Stories are good, as well.
Wow, I remember looking at Gravity's Rainbow and trying to figure it out. Figure the first page out.
But he seems like a good author. I want to read V first, and if I like that I'll check out some other stuff of his.
Vonnegut is awesome, but I like Cat's Cradle most.
I've only read Salinger's Catcher, but that was excellent in its own.
Heller's Catch-22 is another one of my favorite.
Recently, I've been more into reading philosophical works than novels per se, but I like a fair mix though.
Existential stuff is the shit
Camus and Sartre are gods among writers.
I'm not sure if you have, but if you haven't, check out the Flies by Sartre asap. It's one of the coolest things I've ever read.
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  #511  
Old 05-02-2006, 12:39 AM
I've read The Stranger, I'll check out the Flies, I've never read any Sartre. I, too, love Catch-22. I haven't read much philosiphy. I've taken a shot at Nietzche's Thus Spoke Zarathustra (made a bit of sense, not a whole lot though, only read the first twenty pages or so), and Machiavelli's The Prince. I also have yet to read Cat's Cradle, it's been sitting on my shelf for a while. Just throwing it on the talbe, have you ever read any Faulkner? I haven't, myself, looks difficult. Of his best work, I'm told that A Light in August is easiest, I'll try that some time.
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  #512  
Old 05-02-2006, 12:54 AM
The Stranger is excellent. The Plague is a bit better in my opinion, yet most seem to think Stranger is the best. I've heard the Fall is good too.
But you're in for a treat with Sartre. It's available in a book called No Exit and Three Other Plays. Great book.
Also, there is a writer named Friedrich Durrenmatt and he is pure awesomeness. A sarcastic no holds-barred german writer.
His stuff is some of the darkest you will read, but it is very hard to find copies. I found it at some script shop.

Regarding Faulkner, I've read nothing. I was going to sometime, but I just kind of abandoned it. I do want to read the Sound and the Fury and the book you reccomended sounds pleasant.
I might check him out during my annual summer reading fest (it's a one man fest ).
Do check out Cat's Cradle when you have the time - it's really good.
In many ways better than Breakfast.
It's smoother, doesn't feel as obligated to gross you out, and the character's are more likeable. Plus, it's more "Blake-Romantic" mixed with strikes of Heller's Catch-22 than anything.
When you finish reading the book, tell me if that makes any sense.

Speaking of which, my favorite book ever is the Centaur by John Updike. That is so brilliant, words cannot begin to describe how great it is. I give that my highest possible reccomendation.
I've read it twice and am amazed at how well it holds up.
A+++ book...seriously.
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  #513  
Old 05-02-2006, 01:27 AM
I looked up the Centaur, looks good, I'll try and pick it up soon. Should I make sure to do some research on the Greek myth, so I can understand all of the allusions? I'm pretty rusty on the Greek stuff, although I've always found it interesting.
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  #514  
Old 05-02-2006, 01:45 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by bluesbrother965
I looked up the Centaur, looks good, I'll try and pick it up soon. Should I make sure to do some research on the Greek myth, so I can understand all of the allusions? I'm pretty rusty on the Greek stuff, although I've always found it interesting.
Hmm, that's difficult.
There is no real myth of the Centaur.
It's basically a myth regarding the Centaur's origins.
The book is so great because it presents a parable to the centaur's life with this ordinary man's journey. To answer your question, you don't need to do any research. Part of the book is the tale.
It's so well made and so organized with its scheme divisions.
Someone on amazon said it's more of an experience than a read - and I couldn't agree more. I was really touched by the book.
Maybe it was because I read it at 15 and it probably was the best book I'd ever read. I still refer to it as that.
Judging by your other book tastes (an odd word, yes) - I think you'll really dig the book like me.

Finally, I was just thinking of what else I really like and I forgot to mention Bradbury.
My personal favorite is Something Wicked this Way Comes, while I think his undisputed best is of course the classic Fahrenheit 451.

It's refreshing (for me) to talk to someone about books for a change.
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  #515  
Old 05-02-2006, 02:09 AM
I love books, and always have (I'm currently 16, just to put how long "I always have" in perspective). I only wish I could read them faster. It's good to talk with you, as well, book talk's always been kinda slow on this forum, and doesn't usually get very in-depth.


All I've read by Bradbury is Fahrenheit 451 (twice, once for pleasure and then again for school, like a week later ). Fantastic book, although for the future-distopia type books, I prefer Brave New World and 1984 (in that order). I've heard good things about Bradbury's other books. *sigh* So much to read, so much to read.
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  #516  
Old 05-02-2006, 02:19 AM
Quote:
Originally posted by bluesbrother965
I love books, and always have (I'm currently 16, just to put how long "I always have" in perspective). I only wish I could read them faster. It's good to talk with you, as well, book talk's always been kinda slow on this forum, and doesn't usually get very in-depth.


All I've read by Bradbury is Fahrenheit 451 (twice, once for pleasure and then again for school, like a week later ). Fantastic book, although for the future-distopia type books, I prefer Brave New World and 1984 (in that order). I've heard good things about Bradbury's other books. *sigh* So much to read, so much to read.
Ah, you're absolutely right.
So much to read.
Are you turning 17 this year? (eh, just curious)
Brave New World is awesome and I had a lot of fun reading it.
1984 is on par with the equally sophisticated Animal Farm.
In the past few years, I've stopped reading as much because school got pretty more demanding with more reading, but I've made it a task to read more this year.
Speaking of Bradbury though, October Country is one to read during (surprise, surprise) October - especially Halloween.
It is a kickass book.
Dandelion Wine is not my favorite - but still a good read.
I dislike Martian Chronicles, not my piece of cake.
Somethin Wicked this Way Comes is really great though - also a Halloween spirited novel but oh so much fun.
Since you are 16 though, I think you will adore the Centaur.
I literally couldn't put it down.
I'm not sure if you've seen it, but if you have, the Weather Man is not un-similar to the Centaur.

*What do you think of noir novels by Chandler, Hammett, etc...?
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  #517  
Old 05-02-2006, 02:48 AM
No, I turned 16 a couple months ago, so I won't be 17 for a while yet. Since you brought it up, I'll add that Animal Farm is also in my top five or so, I like it even more than 1984. I'll check out the Centaur some time soon, the Weather Man looked interesting but I never got a chance to see it.


I love Chandler and Hammet, I've read several books by each of them and enjoyed them all. The Long Goodbye is my favorite of Chandler's, The Glass Key for Hammet. I love noir in general, be it books, movies, or noir-styled photography (jazz photography is great for this sort of thing). I've never read any James M. Cain, although I've seen the movies of Postman Always Rings Twice (40's version) and Double Indemnity (one of my all-time favorite noir films).
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  #518  
Old 05-02-2006, 11:43 AM
I LOVE Bradbury. He says so much with so little. I haven't read everything by him but Martian Chronicles just broke my heart and I loved Farenheit 911. Ill try his other stuff.

One day Ill read The Long Goodbye by Hammet.
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  #519  
Old 05-02-2006, 11:52 AM
As far as Pynchon goes I tried Gravitys Rainbow several times but I just dont understand. Im trying Vineland after I finsih corrections as I heard thats more accessible.


Oh and if you love Vonnegut you must read Sluahgter House Five. One of the best books Ive ever read. Mother Night is pretty brilliant too and underrated.
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  #520  
Old 05-02-2006, 02:07 PM
Quote:
Originally posted by dman476
Must have taken quite some time, huh?
Indeed compadre
but completely worth it, it was a terrific example of discussion literature.
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