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Could James McAvoy be circling The Crow remake?

Feb. 25, 2013by: Kevin Woods
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When the news hit that a remake/reboot of THE CROW would be heading our way many fans of the original film cried 'Fowl'. Ok, that was a bad pun, I admit, but it is true that those who enjoyed the kickass film that launched a subpar franchise had a hard time wrapping their heads around some other actor stepping into Brandon Lee's iconic role of Eric Draven (and our own Arrow wasn't excited by the prospect, either). Rumors were abound that both Bradley Cooper and Marky Mark Wahlberg were at one time attached or in serious discussions to join the project, which is to be helmed by F. Javier Gutierrez from a screenplay by Jesse Wigutow. Today the chaps over at Bloody Disgusting have it on good word that another actor is circling the remake, and I gotta say that if it holds true, it's not a bad choice.

James McAvoy, who is probably most familiar as the young Charles Xavier from X-MEN: FIRST CLASS or for his role as Wesley in the hyper-kinetic action flick WANTED, is the latest name rumored to be possibly tackling the Eric Draven role in Relativity's long-gestured remake. While this is only conjecture at the moment I like the idea of McAvoy joining the project as he has proven to be a solid actor who will be able to deliver a different take on the character. We'll see if this bird will fly...

We'll keep you up to date on news as it rolls in.

Extra Tidbit: Do you think McAvoy would be a good choice for THE CROW?

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5:41PM on 02/25/2013

I could go for a remake if they stay true to O'Barr's original masterpiece.

A man can be an artist at anything... James O'Barr's art is pain, and THE CROW is his masterpiece. The first film was brilliant and tragic, and the death of Brandon Lee was simply a tragedy that cannot (and should not) be forgotten. That being said, the first film has it's share of flaws, and I would be open to a more faithful adaptation. For example, Eric and Shelly were being evicted from their apartment, and Top Dollar wanted them out bad enough that he was willing to send T-Bird and the
A man can be an artist at anything... James O'Barr's art is pain, and THE CROW is his masterpiece. The first film was brilliant and tragic, and the death of Brandon Lee was simply a tragedy that cannot (and should not) be forgotten. That being said, the first film has it's share of flaws, and I would be open to a more faithful adaptation. For example, Eric and Shelly were being evicted from their apartment, and Top Dollar wanted them out bad enough that he was willing to send T-Bird and the boys to kill them. WHY? The apartment is still deserted a year later, and it still has their stuff in it. I much prefer the original story, where the gang happens upon Eric and Shelly on the side of the road after their car breaks down. It i a totally random crime, the likes of which we read about all the time, but this time the heinous circumstances bring the crow, who tries to persuade Eric not to look as his soulmate is raped and murdered (and then raped again). If the new film leaves out the rock musician angle (which is not in the book.. Eric is thought to be an auto mechanic or possibly a construction worker in the book), the grunge music, and makes a faithful adaptation of the most violent and painful love story I have ever read, they can count me in!

And McAvoy will do fine. Eric is not a martial artist. He is just a normal guy driven completely insane by the pain and the circumstances he finds himself in, and wants to kill the people who murdered him and his true love (and anyone else who gets in his way). Make it dark, make it sad, and make it violent, and you will make a great film. No buddy sidekicks, no little kids (other than a tiny cameo of Sherry as in the book), and none of that losing your powers when your bird gets shot horseshit. The reason he doesn't die when you shoot him is because he is already dead! You don't need to make him vulnerable so the audience can identify with him. He dies, he rises, he kills, he dies again. Keep it simple and it will resonate with audiences. As a huge fan of the source material, that's my two cents... take it for what it's worth.
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