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Hate Crime invades with new posters, trailer

Jan. 28, 2013by: Kevin Woods

Another day, another found footage horror flick.

However this time we have a found footage film that seems to buck the trend and deliver something quite frightening. A multiple award-winning home invasion horror, director James Cullen Bressack's HATE CRIME has traveled a hard road due to its violent content and subject matter. News on the film has been scarce but today we have a look at some new posters promoting the film, as well as the official trailer which you can check out below.

HATE CRIME tells the story of a jewish family, just arrived in a new neighbourhood, who are recording their youngest son's birthday celebrations on video when their home is suddenly invaded by a bunch of crystal-meth-crazed neo nazi lunatics. HATE CRIME is one of the most shocking found footage horror films ever made, caught entirely in real time - a home invasion film you will never forget!

Bressack shared some of the films woes, stating "This film has fought alot of controversy due to it's extreme content, almost being banned in the UK, being pulled off the screens at festivals before even showing due to content and theatre management not willing to show the movie the festival booked, and has faced some trouble finding distribution since the shooting in CT. We actually lost a distribution deal that was on the table due to that horrible tragedy."

Here's hoping that things start looking up for this disturbing tale. I, for one, can not wait to peep it!

Horror Movie Posters
Extra Tidbit: Does HATE CRIME look like it has the goods?

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10:44AM on 01/28/2013
John Carpenter recognizes something occasionally. He points out that horror directors can show audiences events that are truly horrific and shocking. However, the audience will not find such images entertaining. Hate Crime might or might not be an apt example in Carpenter's discussion.
And, Hate Crime might or might not be meritous art. On one hand, it appears to be simply an exploitation film. Potentially, extreme sex and violence are more important in the film than its subject matter or the
John Carpenter recognizes something occasionally. He points out that horror directors can show audiences events that are truly horrific and shocking. However, the audience will not find such images entertaining. Hate Crime might or might not be an apt example in Carpenter's discussion.
And, Hate Crime might or might not be meritous art. On one hand, it appears to be simply an exploitation film. Potentially, extreme sex and violence are more important in the film than its subject matter or the characters' characterization. Like much exploitation, the film might exploit race and (extreme) racism. In past grindhouse fare, violent rednecks would invade an African-American household and use epithets liberally and rape the women and beat the men and etc. Like much exploitation, the movie poster includes a warning that the easily-offended and faint-hearted must not see the show.
On the other hand, Hate Crime's subject matter is of central cultural importance, and its subject matter needs to be presented for the disturbing event that it is. The trailer and poster mention a "wake-up call." Sometimes, viewers gain a greater conscience for having to witness and experience an atrocity in graphic, gut-wrenching detail for an extended period of time. Many exploitation movies actually manage to teach this sympathy. Other types of films do as well (e.g. war movies, true stories). Granted, a person can find taped hate crimes on-line, and he can find documentaries about such occurrences. But, he is unlikely to seek either out. A fictionalized depiction is something that he might watch. Furthermore, Hate Crime is a fiction ultimately. The actors are not really raping a woman in-front of her family. Therefore, a viewer can say "it's only a movie" and any lessons are much safer than viewing the real-life found-footage that criminals make of their satanic "hijinks."

If done with the right intentions, Hate Crime could be something good. If nothing else, Hate Crime shows other film-makers what can be done with the tired found-footage sub-genre.
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