Latest Entertainment News Headlines

20th Century Fox to make all future movies Ultra HD with High Dynamic Range

05.20.2015

The next battle in the Format Wars is heating up as the first film studio has committed to a particular successor to Blu-ray. 20th Century Fox has announced that all of their future film releases will be released in Ultra High Definition (UHD) with High Dynamic Range (HDR). With the prevalence of 4K televisions on the rise, Fox has set the bar for everyone to follow suit. They will also remaster recent releases in UHD/HDR such as X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST and THE MAZE RUNNER.

While there is a group known as the UHD Alliance who are working on determining the agreed upon specifications for HDR amongst all studios, Fox's decision to begin the process will potentially compete with Dolby's Dolby Vision HDR format which Vizio is set to begin manufacturing televisions with. To be clear, these decisions are specific to the home video market. Theater-owners are still a long way from adopting this technology for theater use, although IMAX is beta testing it already.

The gap in digital quality is shrinking at a quicker pace than ever before. Not even twenty years ago, the shift from VHS to DVD led to the demise of the video store. Then, Blu-ray and HD-DVD duked it out for supremacy and now there are some calling the time of death on movies on any form of physical media. With TVs beginning to showcase film better than some movie theaters, the cinematic experience is changing faster than the industry can keep up with it.

There is still no clear answer on what HDR will mean for the common consumer, but expect more news like this to follow over the next few years.

RECOMMENDED MOVIE NEWS

MORE FUN FROM AROUND THE WEB

Strikeback
Not registered? Sign-up!
Or

+0
10:01AM on 05/21/2015
This sounds like a good plan to me. I'm glad Fox is staying on top of technology.
This sounds like a good plan to me. I'm glad Fox is staying on top of technology.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
8:49AM on 05/21/2015
I figure you can miss out every other format change and you'll appreciate the upgrade more and find that your old format is still being supported. I could probably get by with Blu-Ray and 1080p until 8K TVs (or whatever) come along. Certainly the need to buy a new TV with each upgrade in spec makes the process fairly prohibitive for the non wealthy, though I guess when my current TV dies that'll make the decision for me.
I figure you can miss out every other format change and you'll appreciate the upgrade more and find that your old format is still being supported. I could probably get by with Blu-Ray and 1080p until 8K TVs (or whatever) come along. Certainly the need to buy a new TV with each upgrade in spec makes the process fairly prohibitive for the non wealthy, though I guess when my current TV dies that'll make the decision for me.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
6:29AM on 05/21/2015
I think both format would look pretty much the same on normal High Definition TV but Ultra HD would hypothetically look much better on 4K TV. I'll stick with my normal High Definition TV as long as it works. No need to buy new TV yet.
I think both format would look pretty much the same on normal High Definition TV but Ultra HD would hypothetically look much better on 4K TV. I'll stick with my normal High Definition TV as long as it works. No need to buy new TV yet.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
12:47AM on 05/21/2015
At this point streaming and digital media will be more popular than physical media, frankly its on the way out. The cloud, huge hard drives, solid state hard drives, these will be the future of media. More and more media is making its way onto the net and the physical media market is going to shrink to the point of becoming unprofitable. What really needs to happen is an infrastructure update to fiber optic to provide the bandwidth needed for High Def Streaming. The US is decades behind other
At this point streaming and digital media will be more popular than physical media, frankly its on the way out. The cloud, huge hard drives, solid state hard drives, these will be the future of media. More and more media is making its way onto the net and the physical media market is going to shrink to the point of becoming unprofitable. What really needs to happen is an infrastructure update to fiber optic to provide the bandwidth needed for High Def Streaming. The US is decades behind other countries when it comes to infrastructure. Its a shame.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
10:33PM on 05/20/2015
Not buying into the Ultra HD format quite yet. I only really buy the newer movies on blu-ray & I used to have over 600 DVD movies once, but only own a little less than 200 blu-ray movies. I just don't buy into the latest format craze. It's really difficult to try to get the theatre experience at home, unless you really wanna fork over some serious dough. Doesn't seem worthy now & with streaming being so much easier & cheaper, I'd rather stick to that format. I have poor sight as it is, so I
Not buying into the Ultra HD format quite yet. I only really buy the newer movies on blu-ray & I used to have over 600 DVD movies once, but only own a little less than 200 blu-ray movies. I just don't buy into the latest format craze. It's really difficult to try to get the theatre experience at home, unless you really wanna fork over some serious dough. Doesn't seem worthy now & with streaming being so much easier & cheaper, I'd rather stick to that format. I have poor sight as it is, so I really can't tell the difference as far as quality.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
9:57PM on 05/20/2015
Am I the only one who stopped giving shit at dvd?
Am I the only one who stopped giving shit at dvd?
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
+0
9:48PM on 05/20/2015
Streaming bitrates can't match physical media. And they never will with resolutions getting higher. I'm all for UHD but not digitally.
Streaming bitrates can't match physical media. And they never will with resolutions getting higher. I'm all for UHD but not digitally.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
9:24PM on 05/20/2015

I'll be for it

I'll be into this because I love getting the best picture and sound I can get. The only problem is we now have a generation of people who happily download cam versions or inferior dvd or blu ray rips for free who at the moment don't use their 1080p sets to full capacity. They'll be happy to download the 8gb "4k" version and proudly shout they can't see the difference. I know these people because I used to sell them TV's. I even had a guy try to bring back his Blu Ray HDD recorder because it
I'll be into this because I love getting the best picture and sound I can get. The only problem is we now have a generation of people who happily download cam versions or inferior dvd or blu ray rips for free who at the moment don't use their 1080p sets to full capacity. They'll be happy to download the 8gb "4k" version and proudly shout they can't see the difference. I know these people because I used to sell them TV's. I even had a guy try to bring back his Blu Ray HDD recorder because it wouldn't play the MKV's of Game of Thrones he'd downloaded, this was a few years ago obviously. When I told him he wasn't getting his money back because he couldn't play illegally downloaded shows he got pissed and said he'd ring consumer affairs (I'm in Australia) and I told him to go nuts. As long as people think they have a right to download movies for free then physical media will struggle. It's not because of the cost, it's because they don't want to pay for it. If Blu Ray's are 30 bucks they scream they should be 20, if they're 20 bucks they scream they should be 10.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
4:00PM on 05/22/2015
I'll agree with you to a degree...

When studios put out multiple releases of their one movie (be it with extended scenes, more features, better picture quality, alternate endings, etc) they can blame themselves for fans feeling disillusioned with the industry. I've bought Star Wars on VHS, then on VHS with the extra cgi crap from the 90's, DVD (both originals and prequels) x 2, and now once on Bluray. How much dough have I forked over for essentially the same movies, in different formats?
I'll agree with you to a degree...

When studios put out multiple releases of their one movie (be it with extended scenes, more features, better picture quality, alternate endings, etc) they can blame themselves for fans feeling disillusioned with the industry. I've bought Star Wars on VHS, then on VHS with the extra cgi crap from the 90's, DVD (both originals and prequels) x 2, and now once on Bluray. How much dough have I forked over for essentially the same movies, in different formats? This happens all the time be it Star Wars, The Lord Of The Rings, Disney vault movies, etc...

When the industry stops playing cheap with Blurays by releasing first a Bluray with the movie and a few features, then releasing one filled with more features, only to then re-release these movies as part of a boxset or extended scenes, then we the consumers will stop being pirates.

If I've paid $50 to see a movie in theatres, I think it is only fair that the Bluray be priced at $10. You will disagree I'm sure, but even $60 for ONE movie is grossly overpriced when you compare say a video game at $70 which you can play over and over again...
7:24PM on 05/20/2015

Fuck Yea!

As an owner of a 4K Quantum Dot, HDR capable TV, being that shit on!
As an owner of a 4K Quantum Dot, HDR capable TV, being that shit on!
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
6:21PM on 05/20/2015
I understand studios want to move to the next form of media, but the general public just switched to 1080p HDTVs and Blu-Ray players. The average person is not going to switch again for at least another 5 years. As for physical media like Blu-Rays discs, I don't see why studios would push these aside. If you want quality, you aren't going to beat the actual disc. Streaming services are getting better, but their compression will always be a step higher than that of an actual disc.
I understand studios want to move to the next form of media, but the general public just switched to 1080p HDTVs and Blu-Ray players. The average person is not going to switch again for at least another 5 years. As for physical media like Blu-Rays discs, I don't see why studios would push these aside. If you want quality, you aren't going to beat the actual disc. Streaming services are getting better, but their compression will always be a step higher than that of an actual disc.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
+1
4:39PM on 05/20/2015
After years and years of walking into the electronics section of a store with wall to wall TV's, never have I been truly blown away until I saw my first 4k Tv in action. I stopped in my tracks and among a forest of TV screens you could easily see the difference an I headed straight for it to check it out.
Really nice, but I am going to wait until the dust settles and there is enough content to take the plunge. I know a good friend who spent around 5 grand when 3D TV's first come on the scene,
After years and years of walking into the electronics section of a store with wall to wall TV's, never have I been truly blown away until I saw my first 4k Tv in action. I stopped in my tracks and among a forest of TV screens you could easily see the difference an I headed straight for it to check it out.
Really nice, but I am going to wait until the dust settles and there is enough content to take the plunge. I know a good friend who spent around 5 grand when 3D TV's first come on the scene, and I never see him playing anything in 3D other than the samples that come with the TV.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
4:04PM on 05/20/2015

This is bullshit...I haven't even gotten used to Blue Rays!

I think the 'system' wants to kill movies....
I think the 'system' wants to kill movies....
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
+1
3:30PM on 05/20/2015
Is this going to make all epic movies look like a BBC special, like the TV at my Aunt and Uncle's house does?
Is this going to make all epic movies look like a BBC special, like the TV at my Aunt and Uncle's house does?
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
4:02PM on 05/20/2015
No, that's due to higher frame rates and "motion smoothing" features on newer TVs (which can be turned off, by the way), rather than higher resolutions. Historically, films were made to run a 24 frames per second, and TV shows were 30fps. When we see something filmed at greater than 24fps, it looks like a soap opera. They tried to do The Hobbit at a higher frame rate (48fps), and most people hated it for this reason. I suspect they'll keep the frame rates at 24fps.
No, that's due to higher frame rates and "motion smoothing" features on newer TVs (which can be turned off, by the way), rather than higher resolutions. Historically, films were made to run a 24 frames per second, and TV shows were 30fps. When we see something filmed at greater than 24fps, it looks like a soap opera. They tried to do The Hobbit at a higher frame rate (48fps), and most people hated it for this reason. I suspect they'll keep the frame rates at 24fps.
10:15PM on 05/20/2015
Ah, thank you. Very informative, and a relief.
Ah, thank you. Very informative, and a relief.
3:27PM on 05/20/2015
I think online streaming services are a bigger threat to the home video market. I know fewer and fewer people purchasing movies. The file sizes of 4k movies aren't practical for owning at home yet. The first Sony 4k TVs had to come with their own little servers to hold the 12gb and higher 4k movie files.
I think online streaming services are a bigger threat to the home video market. I know fewer and fewer people purchasing movies. The file sizes of 4k movies aren't practical for owning at home yet. The first Sony 4k TVs had to come with their own little servers to hold the 12gb and higher 4k movie files.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
3:45PM on 05/20/2015
I doubt this will do that great. As you mentioned, streaming services are already killing the home video market and it's been less than 10 years for Blu-Ray. Convincing Blu-Ray owners to toss their current machines (which still play DVD's) in favour of yet another new technology is not smart. If Ultra HD has any chance of survival, they'll need to make it compatible with previous technologies.
I doubt this will do that great. As you mentioned, streaming services are already killing the home video market and it's been less than 10 years for Blu-Ray. Convincing Blu-Ray owners to toss their current machines (which still play DVD's) in favour of yet another new technology is not smart. If Ultra HD has any chance of survival, they'll need to make it compatible with previous technologies.
3:18PM on 05/20/2015
So everything is brighter in 4k?
So everything is brighter in 4k?
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
3:24PM on 05/20/2015
It's a better life, yeah. Until 8k.
It's a better life, yeah. Until 8k.
View All Comments

Latest Entertainment News Headlines


Top
Loading...

Featured Youtube Videos

Views and Counting

Movie Hottie Of The Week

More