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C'mon Hollywood #141

Dec. 7, 2007by: Sturdy

... stop the strike!
by Sturdy

I want to make it clear from the beginning that Iím not picking sides here. I think both sides have valid points and I completely respect their stances. Iím not going to attempt to explain the strike or work it out for them. I encourage everyone to go to the WGA website and read their statement on the strike so they can form their own opinions. The purpose of this article is to plead with the production companies and for the leaders of the WGA to come to a resolution and end this strike.


I guess Norma Rae would be proud

Personally, Iíve never been involved with a strike. I lived in Flint, MI for a while, and Iím familiar with the Eastern Airlines strike, but Iíve never actually been a part of a union or gone through a strike. However, the potential for damages caused by union-led strikes are not debatable and there are devastating examples sprinkled throughout American history. The current writerís strike has the potential to be one of the devastating examples. The longer the strike lasts, the more everyone has to lose.

Think about what TV would be like without writers. Reality TV shows would be all the craze and the number one show in America would be a ridiculous talent show of some sort. WaitÖdamnÖnever mind. I think the fact that the general television audience already prefers reality shows speaks volumes for the studios being pressured into a new deal with the WGA. Remember that the last time the WGA went on strike, it actually spawned shows like COPS, Americaís Most Wanted and others. All of which became hits.

But thatís TVís problem. For movie buffs, the problem is more complicated. In theory, there should be thousands of scripts out there that could be made into films, so Hollywood could ride this thing out for a while. But not so fast, just because a script has been written, it doesnít mean itís ready to be filmed. Hollywood still needs writers to polish scripts and change them during filming. I mean, not just anyone can write a spectacular script like SHREK 3. WaitÖdamn again. That leads us to my biggest fear for Hollywood; weíll get more blockbusters with half-assed scripts. Itís unfortunate since it seemed like Hollywood was finally getting back to original, intelligent films with good scripts.


And Hoffa tooÖ

So címon Hollywood and the WGA, end the strike now. Both sides need to lock themselves in a room and not come out until they have an agreement. Itís going to take a genuine, committed effort from both sides to end this thing. The strike is only gong to lead to more reality television and more mindless movies. Studios arenít going to run dead air, theyíll find something to put on TV. And movie studios arenít going to shut down either. Theyíll continue to make movies, just with less emphasis on scripts. Itís just now the boy in the mailroom will be the one tweaking them and professional script writers will be writing novels instead. I honestly hope they can come to a conclusion that will please both sides. I just hope movie and TV fans donít have to pay too steep a price.

Extra Tidbit: Just out of curiosity, if a Hollywood or Television studio right now called you up and offered to buy your script as long as you agreed to work on it during filming and make the changes they requested, would you do it? Knowing of course, you would never be a part of the Writerís Guild and that as soon as the strike ended, youíd never write a script again.
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4:49PM on 12/08/2007

Please!

Why is anyone entitled to anything?

Many of us create things for our employers/clients that we get paid for up front and will never see any back end. As we get better in our chosen professions, most will move up and be compensated. Look at Conan O'Brien, Tina Fey, and a slew of others.

Or, take a risk and put up the money and produce a show to see if you can make a profit. Oh, yeah, you have to be evil to do such a thing. I forgot.

Like it or not, writers (and others apparently not as
Why is anyone entitled to anything?

Many of us create things for our employers/clients that we get paid for up front and will never see any back end. As we get better in our chosen professions, most will move up and be compensated. Look at Conan O'Brien, Tina Fey, and a slew of others.

Or, take a risk and put up the money and produce a show to see if you can make a profit. Oh, yeah, you have to be evil to do such a thing. I forgot.

Like it or not, writers (and others apparently not as important) are just an expense against the bottom line. Get used to it and stop complaining.
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+0
3:52AM on 12/08/2007

End it

While I have never worked on a film, I have worked behind the scenes on stage productions and it's my film counterparts that I feel for. Yes writers are underpaid, but that still dwarfs the wages for the people behind the scenes (who receive no royalties). While I'm not a fan of Carson Daly per se, the guy is getting slammed for keeping his employees working (the dude is not pulling down Leno money to keep them all paid for out of pocket). While the complaint by writers is valid, striking seems
While I have never worked on a film, I have worked behind the scenes on stage productions and it's my film counterparts that I feel for. Yes writers are underpaid, but that still dwarfs the wages for the people behind the scenes (who receive no royalties). While I'm not a fan of Carson Daly per se, the guy is getting slammed for keeping his employees working (the dude is not pulling down Leno money to keep them all paid for out of pocket). While the complaint by writers is valid, striking seems incredibly irresponsible for what amounts to royalties on hypothetical earnings online in the future. They should have locked both sides in a room until both sides came to a solution and then let them out. Recently, just when they were making some progress the writers throw on the table they want authority over other writing unions as well (like reality t.v.). WTF?! The writers are being treated like poor run down heroes, and while they are the BACKBONE of the industry, I can't really weep over a profession that pays an average of $200,000 a year because they want a bigger part of the 'net. Maybe a little more negotiation and less rabid attacks on anyone who doesn't agree with them may have swayed me futher to their side.
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1:16PM on 12/07/2007
Being a still fairly unknown actor myself, I have to say this strike is killing me, because now auditions for projects that could help me get into SAG are impossible to get.

But, as pg13myass said below, there's the potential actor's strike to look forward to this June, so I can't say I'm exactly thrilled to join the Union just yet. Still, I want to f#*@ing work, dammit!

Also, there are a plethora of people out there losing their jobs because of the strike, namely those who held solid
Being a still fairly unknown actor myself, I have to say this strike is killing me, because now auditions for projects that could help me get into SAG are impossible to get.

But, as pg13myass said below, there's the potential actor's strike to look forward to this June, so I can't say I'm exactly thrilled to join the Union just yet. Still, I want to f#*@ing work, dammit!

Also, there are a plethora of people out there losing their jobs because of the strike, namely those who held solid gigs on TV shows. I read an article a guy wrote who worked (I say worked because as he stated in his article, he is now out of a job) on THE OFFICE, and he listed how many people who weren't writers, and what their position was on the show and how it's going to be difficult for them to provide for themselves and their families. Because as he said, these writer's are getting paid their residuals for all these re-runs they're airing now.

It's a double-edged sword, and hard to pick one side over the other, but I can say I'm a BIG supporter of getting this strike over!
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12:11PM on 12/07/2007
Well, even if this strike finally resolves itself, we still have the upcoming actor's strike to look toward as well. I, for one, am not thrilled about it.
Well, even if this strike finally resolves itself, we still have the upcoming actor's strike to look toward as well. I, for one, am not thrilled about it.
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