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C'mon Hollywood: Should videogames be adapted?

Oct. 2, 2012by: Paul Shirey

Living in today’s world, it’s almost impossible to not play video games to some degree.  Some are obsessed to an unhealthy level of gameplay, while others keep it casual enough to be a fun escape.  With the videogame industry generating billions of dollars per year and people gaming on one platform or another now more than any other time in history, it’s perfectly understandable that those same fans would want to see their favorite game(s) brought to life on the big screen.

But, is it really necessary?

Hollywood hasn’t really had much success in the videogame genre, with 2001’s LARA CROFT: TOMB RAIDER being the top grosser at just $131 million.  The next two highest-grossing videogame adaptations are PRINCE OF PERSIA: THE SANDS OF TIME and POKEMON: THE FIRST MOVIE.  Not exactly the hottest properties on the block and sadly the top earners.  The most successful series is RESIDENT EVIL, but even that has been a temperamental success.  The hardcore gamers are mostly up in arms about the adaptation, even though it manages to consistently rake in cash.  MORTAL KOMBAT, arguably the best of all videogame adaptations, is still easily forgettable. 

The rest are mostly a smorgasbord of crappy adaptations, from DOOM to MAX PAYNE to HITMAN to SUPER MARIO BROS. to STREET FIGHTER; it’s been a real shitty ride.  So, what’s the deal?  Is Hollywood going after all the wrong franchises or is it more of a question in regards to performance?  After all, even with TOMB RAIDER’s decent numbers, it doesn’t exactly inspire confidence by jumping into a genre that’s never cracked $150 million at the box office.  The majority of videogame adaptations have either bombed completely or just barely made their budget back.  That’s not the best incentive to flood theaters with more of them.

When talking about which games to adapt you run into even more problems.  The most popular games making the most cash are your first-person shooters like Call of Duty, old school games like Super Mario Bros., “role play” games like Grand Theft Auto, or the new hotness of Wii games.  The one thing missing from all of these games is a true narrative structure to build a film.  There are some amazingly immersive visuals and story elements put into these games, but they’re all created to drive gameplay, not narrative.  Skyrim is chock full of creatures, wildlife, people, and tasks, all of which are driven by the player, operating within the shell of a “story.”  It’s an amazing experience to play, but I’d never want to sit back and watch it.

Even with the impressive cinematics that feel like you’re watching a movie, they’re still fleeting, as each one leads directly into gameplay and the gameplay IS the action.  In movies, the action IS the film, so the task for anyone adapting a videogame is how to employ the gameplay into a narrative structure, which is a messy, messy business.  I’ve played a shitload of videogames and spent HOURS on various stages trying to beat a key villain with every weapon, power, spell, whatever at my disposal and it can be a maddening, adrenaline-fueled rush.  But, how do you translate that feeling to a movie?  Better yet; is it even possible?

The problem is you, the gamer.  You ARE these characters, regardless of what the cinematic says.  You are making the decisions, you are in control, and you are playing the way you want, for the most part.  Thereby, your expectations for how these characters are adapted become deeply personal and any deviation from your expectations becomes blasphemy.  And how do you gauge expectations?  Are people pining for a properly executed boat chase in a Modern Warfare movie?  A dragon fight in a Skyrim film?  A race battle in a Mario Kart feature?  I guarantee every fan of those games has their own version of what would have to be included and how.  And I think if they really put it in perspective, there’s just not much reason to care.  Why?  Because the 2-hour experience of the film can never amount to the weeks, months, and years spent on any one game.  The investment becomes personal (and sometimes a little sad) with gamers not willing to let anything go in bringing this epic experience down a few notches to meet a limited timeframe and a wider audience.  And in the end, it kind of defeats the purpose of playing the game in the first place. 

Personally, I don’t ever want to see a Call of Duty or Elder Scrolls movie.  The experience is too big and too personal to try and adapt and I’m certain to be disappointed.  The higher concept franchises like Halo, The Legend of Zelda, Mass Effect, Metal Gear, or Gears of War have a much better chance at being a worthwhile movie experience, because they’re rooted in compelling characters and stories that can stand on their own outside of being our avatar.  And those rare few are still a major challenge to adapt.  Mostly, I think, videogames should be left to the consoles and the gamers.  The experience of playing a game vs. watching a movie is completely independent of one another and that’s just the way I like it. If Hollywood is somehow able to "crack the code" at some point, I'll welcome a solid adaptation. But, I'm not holding my breath. 

Extra Tidbit: I suppose the same argument could be made about books being adapted into films, but that would be a weak argument, seeing as they A) have narrative structure, B) have won Oscars and, C) make lots and lots of money. Books-adapted-to-film: Lord of the Rings, The Shawshank Redemption, The Silence of the Lambs, The Godfather, L.A. Confidential, etc., etc.
Source: JoBlo.com

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+1
11:32PM on 10/02/2012
I would say that the most frustrating aspect of this is that there are so many games today that have put so much effort into creating structure and narrative coherence that there is no reason not to option an existing game and giving it full artistic attention as far as adaptation and directing is concerned. I feel that there hasn't been any real effort to alter or add to these stories and characters (with the exception of WTF efforts like Mario Bros.). There's so much that can be done with
I would say that the most frustrating aspect of this is that there are so many games today that have put so much effort into creating structure and narrative coherence that there is no reason not to option an existing game and giving it full artistic attention as far as adaptation and directing is concerned. I feel that there hasn't been any real effort to alter or add to these stories and characters (with the exception of WTF efforts like Mario Bros.). There's so much that can be done with Half Life, Halo or Bioshock just to name a few. They all have base stories that would hold up so well in cinema. All they need is the drive, balls and studio funding to get something substantial off the ground.
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8:48PM on 10/02/2012

Yes, but..........

Yes I think they should be adapted but as long as they are in the right hands. I now stay away from any movie directed by UWE BOLL at all cost.....His movies are so terrible. If the genre dies it would be mostly this mans fault.
Yes I think they should be adapted but as long as they are in the right hands. I now stay away from any movie directed by UWE BOLL at all cost.....His movies are so terrible. If the genre dies it would be mostly this mans fault.
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8:44PM on 10/02/2012

Y'know ...

If any of you guys have heard of the Game Overthinker, he did a great video on what is up with Hollywood and video game movies. You can watch it here: [link]

On a personal note, I think that the reason why good video game movies are so few and far between is because Hollywood keeps picking the wrong video games: ones that don't translate well into movies, and then giving them to third-rate directors and writers who don't know thing one about the source material or have no respect for it,
If any of you guys have heard of the Game Overthinker, he did a great video on what is up with Hollywood and video game movies. You can watch it here: [link]

On a personal note, I think that the reason why good video game movies are so few and far between is because Hollywood keeps picking the wrong video games: ones that don't translate well into movies, and then giving them to third-rate directors and writers who don't know thing one about the source material or have no respect for it, and then try to make something that doesn't even resemble the game even superficially. And finally, and most insultingly ... they give the run around to, and then pass up good combinations that would have made good video game movies. (COUGH, COUGH PETERJACKSONHALO COUGH, COUGH) Hollywood just needs to understand that there is a market there, but they need to start listening to the fans to understand what would make a good VG movie, and getting the right people in on the project.
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6:25PM on 10/02/2012
I've enjoyed most video game adaptions(yes, even the Uwe Boll ones, at the very least they're more watchable then those damn Twilight films) so i'm not all opposed to more adaptions. That said I don't really think it's necessary to make a COD film, Act Of Valor was pretty close to what i'd envision a COD film to be like. I would love to see adaptions of Halo, Mass Effect, Killzone and the like. Grand Theft Auto and Saints Row are probably too broad for film adaptions, I am excited about the
I've enjoyed most video game adaptions(yes, even the Uwe Boll ones, at the very least they're more watchable then those damn Twilight films) so i'm not all opposed to more adaptions. That said I don't really think it's necessary to make a COD film, Act Of Valor was pretty close to what i'd envision a COD film to be like. I would love to see adaptions of Halo, Mass Effect, Killzone and the like. Grand Theft Auto and Saints Row are probably too broad for film adaptions, I am excited about the upcoming Kane And Lynch film though.
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8:55AM on 10/03/2012
The Twilight movies are better than Uwe Bolls' videogame adaptations. I now it's hip to bash on Twilight and yes I agree the movies are kinda boring for masculine R-rating demanding movie junks, but at least the editing is right. The story flows unlike an Uwe Boll film that just looks like random scenes pasted together, something that only worked in Postal. That movie was fun in a Troma way. But his serious efforts are all incomprehensible snoozefests.
The Twilight movies are better than Uwe Bolls' videogame adaptations. I now it's hip to bash on Twilight and yes I agree the movies are kinda boring for masculine R-rating demanding movie junks, but at least the editing is right. The story flows unlike an Uwe Boll film that just looks like random scenes pasted together, something that only worked in Postal. That movie was fun in a Troma way. But his serious efforts are all incomprehensible snoozefests.
11:14AM on 10/03/2012
You mean to say the story in Twilight BLOWS, the only Boll film I found to be a snoozefest was Seed, that one was just too dark depressing and not fun like Far Cry, House Of The Dead and Alone In The Dark were.
You mean to say the story in Twilight BLOWS, the only Boll film I found to be a snoozefest was Seed, that one was just too dark depressing and not fun like Far Cry, House Of The Dead and Alone In The Dark were.
+1
4:42PM on 10/02/2012
You just need a good script and a crew that puts actual effort into it. If they care enough, you can get a good movie out of a video game. The tidbit mentions books but that's not a great comparison. A better one would be movies based off of comic books. Comic books are something the general public didn't take seriously, we've had a few failures for movies based off of them, but now they've developed into something great. I mean look at the depth we got off of Nolan's TDK Trilogy. With a good
You just need a good script and a crew that puts actual effort into it. If they care enough, you can get a good movie out of a video game. The tidbit mentions books but that's not a great comparison. A better one would be movies based off of comic books. Comic books are something the general public didn't take seriously, we've had a few failures for movies based off of them, but now they've developed into something great. I mean look at the depth we got off of Nolan's TDK Trilogy. With a good enough script and filmmaker I believe we can get a really good movie based off of a video game. It doesn't hurt to try. It's not like people aren't gonna buy the games anymore if the movie sucks.
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4:35PM on 10/02/2012

Possible

Done right, Halo and Assassin's Creed could be very good and extremely successful to both gamers and non-gamers. A lot like how the Marvel movies brought in a lot of fans that both read comic books and don't. Apparently, had Prince of Persia done remotely well (from a critical standpoint. I don't remember how much money it ended up making), Assassin's Creed would have been next on their list of video games to adapt. I know Halo is stuck in pre-production purgatory, but Assassin's Creed has rich
Done right, Halo and Assassin's Creed could be very good and extremely successful to both gamers and non-gamers. A lot like how the Marvel movies brought in a lot of fans that both read comic books and don't. Apparently, had Prince of Persia done remotely well (from a critical standpoint. I don't remember how much money it ended up making), Assassin's Creed would have been next on their list of video games to adapt. I know Halo is stuck in pre-production purgatory, but Assassin's Creed has rich characters, plenty of action, great story, and a neat historical/sci-fi mix to it. Properly made, that would be very very lucrative
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3:57PM on 10/02/2012
I guess the problem is that most videogames adaptations feel really uninspired, probably because most of the times the director has zero interest in the source material and is just looking for quick and easy money.
I guess the problem is that most videogames adaptations feel really uninspired, probably because most of the times the director has zero interest in the source material and is just looking for quick and easy money.
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2:57PM on 10/02/2012

Gears of War

would be a great adaptation that would seem hard to foul up. remember the trailer for the original game? that got me more excited for a video game than most movie trailers do. and I didn't even own an x-box!
would be a great adaptation that would seem hard to foul up. remember the trailer for the original game? that got me more excited for a video game than most movie trailers do. and I didn't even own an x-box!
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1:58PM on 10/02/2012
There's a lot of terrible cinematic videogame adaptations out there, yes. Doesn't mean they have to be.
When you have a concept as strong as Bioshock you could make a fantastic film out of it, so in a way it's a shame they haven't managed to figure that one out yet, but at the same time it's nice that they haven't screwed it up with a mediocre adaptation yet either.
There's a lot of terrible cinematic videogame adaptations out there, yes. Doesn't mean they have to be.
When you have a concept as strong as Bioshock you could make a fantastic film out of it, so in a way it's a shame they haven't managed to figure that one out yet, but at the same time it's nice that they haven't screwed it up with a mediocre adaptation yet either.
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1:28PM on 10/02/2012
While most game films are a massive failure, there are the few that offer glimmers of hope. Takashi Miike has directed two very successful adaptations in Like A Dragon (Yakuza) and Ace Attorney. Ace Attorney is arguably the best adaptation of a game ever. My personal fave from Hollywood is Silent Hill. Not a great movie, script and acting were pretty bad, but there were a number of great things about the film including the atmosphere and the creatures. It's not a matter of these games not being
While most game films are a massive failure, there are the few that offer glimmers of hope. Takashi Miike has directed two very successful adaptations in Like A Dragon (Yakuza) and Ace Attorney. Ace Attorney is arguably the best adaptation of a game ever. My personal fave from Hollywood is Silent Hill. Not a great movie, script and acting were pretty bad, but there were a number of great things about the film including the atmosphere and the creatures. It's not a matter of these games not being good really, it's the improper adaptations of them. If one man can successfully adapt a game like Ace Attorney, how is it so hard to adapt something like Uncharted, which is huge in the story department and cinematic enough to be adaptable. The same with Metal Gear Solid, and the fact that Avi Arad is behind it with Kojima himself overseeing is a bit hopeful. But the main point is that it's certainly possible if you have a game that is cinematic enough and with a really solid plot.
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1:17PM on 10/02/2012
It's like the whole "Uncharted" debacle. You have a director who has no grasp of what made the games fun, changes too much about the hero's life (adding more family and making him super rich like Lara Croft) and essentially take all the true elements of the game and piss on them. Mark Walburg, I don't hate him as an actor but her certainly does not have the charisma Nolan North gives Drake. All in all, most directors respect the novels they base their films on but very few respect the games
It's like the whole "Uncharted" debacle. You have a director who has no grasp of what made the games fun, changes too much about the hero's life (adding more family and making him super rich like Lara Croft) and essentially take all the true elements of the game and piss on them. Mark Walburg, I don't hate him as an actor but her certainly does not have the charisma Nolan North gives Drake. All in all, most directors respect the novels they base their films on but very few respect the games they base their films on. That's part of the problem.
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1:03PM on 10/02/2012
I partially disagree. Yes, the vast majority of video game adaptations have sucked, it's not that they wouldn't work as a movie, it's that they were made by people who fundamentally didn't understand the product. Look at my personal favorite video game adaptation, "Silent Hill" (why wasn't this mentioned above?)- I feel it works, despite some pacing issues because the filmmakers understood what made that series terrifying. They created an original story, but kept the right elements in; going so
I partially disagree. Yes, the vast majority of video game adaptations have sucked, it's not that they wouldn't work as a movie, it's that they were made by people who fundamentally didn't understand the product. Look at my personal favorite video game adaptation, "Silent Hill" (why wasn't this mentioned above?)- I feel it works, despite some pacing issues because the filmmakers understood what made that series terrifying. They created an original story, but kept the right elements in; going so far as to use music and ambient noise lifted wholesale from the games. That respect showed up on screen, IMO. Also, the first "Mortal Kombat" movie, while not as serious as some would like, works because it's A) the characters from the games fighting each other, and B) doesn't try to be 'realistic and gritty', instead embracing the fantastical elements, and not alienating the fans. Get people that respect the source material, and good can happen.
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12:49PM on 10/02/2012
I think it is possible for there to be a successful game-to-film adaptation, as long as there is enough respect for the source material and a true creative vision. Games such as Fallout, Red Dead Redemption, and Assassin's Creed have rich storylines that are cinematic enough already to provide ample room for compelling film adaptations.
I think it is possible for there to be a successful game-to-film adaptation, as long as there is enough respect for the source material and a true creative vision. Games such as Fallout, Red Dead Redemption, and Assassin's Creed have rich storylines that are cinematic enough already to provide ample room for compelling film adaptations.
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12:45PM on 10/02/2012
Some games would make fantastic films - some are incredibly story driven, or have a very clear narrative structure. Uncharted is a no-brainer, even if they seem like they're trying to fuck it up royally - the key isn't to do one of the games, but to use the characters and the story style to make a new story. It's not like Nathan Drake is sitting on his duff between adventures - just write a new one. Metal Gear would actually make a fine movie - it's not like you have a whole lot of choice in
Some games would make fantastic films - some are incredibly story driven, or have a very clear narrative structure. Uncharted is a no-brainer, even if they seem like they're trying to fuck it up royally - the key isn't to do one of the games, but to use the characters and the story style to make a new story. It's not like Nathan Drake is sitting on his duff between adventures - just write a new one. Metal Gear would actually make a fine movie - it's not like you have a whole lot of choice in the matter. You play that game to be a part of Solid Snake being awesome, and a movie can deliver a similar, or at least parallel, experience. Cut out some of the wackier elements, tighten up the dialogue, and you basically have Die Hard in Alaska, with mild supernatural elements. I would love to see that on the big screen.

The problem is commitment. Right now, we're seeing video game movies that are very reminiscent of the bad superhero movies of the eighties/nineties. The Punishers, the Batman Forevers/and Robins, the Corman Fantastic Four. We haven't entered the Golden Age of Video Game Movies, but we will. Probably around time people get sick of super hero movies. Not that I'll be one of those people.
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12:28PM on 10/02/2012
It stands to reason that Hollywood, in its struggle to find properties to adapt, would try to make movies out of video-games. Video games are a serious competitor. While box-office is waning, video-games are becoming more and more popular. And so you run into the problems mentioned above. Now, a lot of people want to see these games adapted, because in their mind they know who would be perfect to play the characters. But the story still suffers. What aggravates me is how a movie as seemingly
It stands to reason that Hollywood, in its struggle to find properties to adapt, would try to make movies out of video-games. Video games are a serious competitor. While box-office is waning, video-games are becoming more and more popular. And so you run into the problems mentioned above. Now, a lot of people want to see these games adapted, because in their mind they know who would be perfect to play the characters. But the story still suffers. What aggravates me is how a movie as seemingly straight-forward as "Max Payne" could turn out so horribly. I think there is kind of a tendency to try and serve two masters. On one hand, the gamer, who is watching as a fan to make sure certain bases are covered. On the other hand, there is the regular movie-goer, who is already not looking for a video-game to watch, feeling let down because the filmmakers didn't worry enough about just telling a good story. Allegedly, "Silent Hill" is a movie that audiences (non-gamers anyway) didn't hate. An idea I have, "A History of Violence" was based on a graphic novel. David Cronenberg didn't know that when he read the script. So the movie is just what he made based on the script. I don't mean deceive the filmmaker, but take a less-than-red-hot property that nonetheless has some promise to it, let the filmmaker do their thing. Now, that would do no more than maybe dispel the rumor that video-games are unadaptable. Fans would still hate it. Hollywood would never bite because they want to appeal to as many people as they can. Alternately, when I was growing up I played a lot of LucasArts computer games, in particular "Full Throttle" was one I liked to play, because it played like a movie. You walk around, you talk to people, you figure the puzzle out, and cut-scene. You could adapt it scene-for-scene into a regular movie and people might watch it, because it's not an extremely interactive game. But, that's not what's popular right now.
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11:29AM on 10/02/2012
I tend to agree as the stories seem to alienate the gamers because the script and atmosphere does not follow the source material, and on the flip side, non-gamers may just be turned off by the fact that it's a movie based off of a video game. However, that's what was kind of happening in the comic book world until "x" movie brought it to the next level. You mentioned Zelda and I always though the NES game Zelda II: The Adventure of Link would be a great story to adapt and one of the fairly
I tend to agree as the stories seem to alienate the gamers because the script and atmosphere does not follow the source material, and on the flip side, non-gamers may just be turned off by the fact that it's a movie based off of a video game. However, that's what was kind of happening in the comic book world until "x" movie brought it to the next level. You mentioned Zelda and I always though the NES game Zelda II: The Adventure of Link would be a great story to adapt and one of the fairly easier ones to do. If it worked, it could turn out to be a great franchise.
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11:12AM on 10/02/2012

Issues with game adaptations.

The biggest issue is that as much of a storyline games like Halo have - it's really hard to connect a strong protagonist to a storyline. That's because the player has to occupy a certain amount of space in the game narrative. You're pulling the player out - which fundamentally changes the game. Instead of a straight adaptation, I think what is feasible is something that occupies the same franchise, but isn't a straight adaptation. Take Fallout - there's a a great aesthetic and setting there. If
The biggest issue is that as much of a storyline games like Halo have - it's really hard to connect a strong protagonist to a storyline. That's because the player has to occupy a certain amount of space in the game narrative. You're pulling the player out - which fundamentally changes the game. Instead of a straight adaptation, I think what is feasible is something that occupies the same franchise, but isn't a straight adaptation. Take Fallout - there's a a great aesthetic and setting there. If you tasked a writer with occupying that franchise, but giving them free reign to write their own story, you *could* come up with something great.
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12:35PM on 10/02/2012
Thing is, that's what fan-films are for. Since Fallout is basically a reworking of the Mad Max mythos, and there's not really a shortage of post-apocalyptic movies as it is, tenuously tying it in with the Fallout franchise seems unnecessary. It's the sort of move a studio would make just to scrape up a little extra cash. It could work, but associating it with Fallout would make me automatically take it less seriously than otherwise. It's like telling the story of a working-class family in
Thing is, that's what fan-films are for. Since Fallout is basically a reworking of the Mad Max mythos, and there's not really a shortage of post-apocalyptic movies as it is, tenuously tying it in with the Fallout franchise seems unnecessary. It's the sort of move a studio would make just to scrape up a little extra cash. It could work, but associating it with Fallout would make me automatically take it less seriously than otherwise. It's like telling the story of a working-class family in Gotham City, whose only connection to Batman is hearing about him on the TV. It would feel like a bit of a gimmick.
1:40PM on 10/02/2012
You see, this is the issue. If you give filmmakers free rein to do what they want with ANY videogame property then you're going to get stuff like Resident Evil. They'll create new characters, add things, delete things, shorten things, etc. I loved Fallout and New Vegas. Great games. I spent months playing them. Now, how do you adapt that experience? It's impossible. The biggest problem is that the main character, YOU, are completely undefined. You are always obscure enough to be
You see, this is the issue. If you give filmmakers free rein to do what they want with ANY videogame property then you're going to get stuff like Resident Evil. They'll create new characters, add things, delete things, shorten things, etc. I loved Fallout and New Vegas. Great games. I spent months playing them. Now, how do you adapt that experience? It's impossible. The biggest problem is that the main character, YOU, are completely undefined. You are always obscure enough to be anyone, which makes it possible to customize and create who you'll be as it fits your personality. How in the world can you appease gamers or general audiences like that?

There's always the chance that lighting could be caught in a bottle...but it's STILL catching lighting in a bottle...no small feat, and certainly not a tried-and-true formula. Again, the issue isn't that videogames don't have mountains of material to work from, but the majority are lacking in main characters, because that main character is you. That said, there are plenty of characters they could choose from...they simply don't. And why would they with it being such a massive gamble?

Great comments, guys.
5:17PM on 10/02/2012
I think the issue is also that if you gave director's free reign - you would have to find a better crop of directors. Frankly, what you get is Uwe Boll, and then a bunch of directors who are basically going to do whatever they are told. While I get the point about Gotham working-class family, I'd say there's something in between. The FPS scene in DOOM might be one of the most obvious examples of what's wrong with video game movie adaptations. These things that are relevant to the video game are
I think the issue is also that if you gave director's free reign - you would have to find a better crop of directors. Frankly, what you get is Uwe Boll, and then a bunch of directors who are basically going to do whatever they are told. While I get the point about Gotham working-class family, I'd say there's something in between. The FPS scene in DOOM might be one of the most obvious examples of what's wrong with video game movie adaptations. These things that are relevant to the video game are totally irrelevant to a movie - and also gimmicky. I guess the Star Wars property is an example of some decent transitions FROM film to video games - and part of that success (more recently anyway) has been the ability to go outside the trilogies (don't get me wrong; I love me some Super Empire Strikes Back on the SNES).

I understand the difficulty in crossing the chasm of two different media that are structurally different (if not at odds) - but trying to retain that original essence of the game is horrible. Also - with all due respect to video game producers, the story writing is usually the weakest. I'll probably get flamed for this, but even for games like the Mass Effect trilogy - the writing only seems good, because you're comparing it to other video games. If you drop a screenwriter into a project and say, you have to retain "X,Y, and Z," you essentially telling the guy that this lesser story is in control, and all he can do is straighten things up around the margins.

Someday, somebody is going to prove me wrong, but until then, I'll keep passing on video game adaptations. (And I really hope the guy to prove me wrong is Charlie Kaufman.)
11:05AM on 10/02/2012
It's just no has written a solid script yet. I believe it can work. I actually liked Hitman, for what it was.
It's just no has written a solid script yet. I believe it can work. I actually liked Hitman, for what it was.
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10:25AM on 10/02/2012
The people involved in making these video game to the big screen movies (directors, producers and actors) really don't get to translate what the game is because I don't think they play them and dedicate large amounts of time to fully understand each game. Play the games for a few weeks, get into it, then hire people that do the same in my opinion if you want it to be successful
The people involved in making these video game to the big screen movies (directors, producers and actors) really don't get to translate what the game is because I don't think they play them and dedicate large amounts of time to fully understand each game. Play the games for a few weeks, get into it, then hire people that do the same in my opinion if you want it to be successful
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10:08AM on 10/02/2012
The problem is that almost every video game movie out there doesn't remain faithful to the brilliant storylines developed for the games. Case in point: Resident Evils keep getting popped out, but they are nothing like the storyline that made the first few so likable.
The problem is that almost every video game movie out there doesn't remain faithful to the brilliant storylines developed for the games. Case in point: Resident Evils keep getting popped out, but they are nothing like the storyline that made the first few so likable.
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10:05AM on 10/02/2012
I don't see the need for an all-encompassing rule that says something should NEVER be adapted.
I don't see the need for an all-encompassing rule that says something should NEVER be adapted.
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