Latest Entertainment News Headlines

C'mon Hollywood: Why Deadpool was a success and what we can learn from it

02.16.2016

In the world of Hollywood we all know what happens once a movie is a huge success: They try to replicate it. Not just in sequels, spin-offs, and the like, but by combing the sea for new or existing properties that can in some way emulate the success of a mega hit. And hey, it’s business and a competitive one at that, so it makes sense to want to get in on that action. The problem comes when Hollywood tries to replicate that success by very quickly (and without much thought, passion or attention to detail) shoving something out there to ride the coattails of that magic.

Such is likely to be the case with DEADPOOL, which cleaned up at the box office this past weekend, raking in more than $135 million domestically in a 4-day period. In February. That’s a hell of an accomplishment to be sure and one that hardly anyone saw coming. Well, except those that know the character and how significant he’s been since his inception. Created by Rob Liefeld & Fabian Nicieza in the pages of Marvel’s The New Mutants #98, DEADPOOL took off like crazy, selling 7 million copies combined of his first three appearances. That's not a regular occurrence in comics. Looking very much like “Spider-Man with guns and swords” and with a smart ass attitude that grew even crazier and more intense throughout the years as he was passed on from creator-to-creator, DEADPOOL took shape as not only a popular X-books character, but a staple in pop culture as a whole.

One thing I've noticed in many of the think pieces aimed at trying to put a finger on why DEADPOOL was such a success is a complete misunderstanding of the character's popularity altogether. Part of that comes from the disregard of comic books and fans alike in this whole scheme. Many venues are at a point now where they have to report on the comic book medium as it relates to film seeing as it's the leading genre, but it's done so in a way that pays no mind to where these things take root and can often feel condescending. Just as I saw in art school where instructors regarded comics as "mindless pop art" that had no bearing on "real" art, I think that translates to mass media outlets reporting on CBM's as well (outside of most movie news sites, of course, who generally "get it"), who see only "funny book" characters that "the kids seem to enjoy" making a ton of money until the bubble bursts. Not that I personally give a shit if some of them feel that way. We live in an era where the nerds have won the popularity contest at the box office and I'm more than happy to support and be a part of that for however long it lasts.

However, it's the antiquated mindset that hurts the true understanding of who Deadpool is, why people care, and, ultimately, why it brought in shitloads of money this past weekend. In fact, while on the set visit for DEADPOOL there were many journalists there who simply did not "get" Deadpool and expressed their discontent that it was a superhero film they couldn't take their kids to, as if each film that comes from a comic must meet that criteria to be legitimate or successful. It's this mindset and preconceived notion about what a comic book character is and how they fit in the general structure of the comic book movie medium that hinders (and will continue to hinder) Hollywood execs and non-fan media venues from "getting it". Quite simply, they don't read comics or care to start reading them, thereby allowing box office receipts and a common formula to dictate what is successful, rather than look at WHY any given film would make that much in the first place. One guy cracked that code a long time ago and his understanding has led to the biggest and most successful comic book cinematic universe currently in play...

“I would hear people, other executives, struggling over a character point, or struggling over how to make a connection, or struggling over how to give even surface-level depth to an action scene or to a character. I’d be sitting there reading the comics going, ‘Look at this. Just do this. This is incredible.’ ” - Kevin Feige, Bloomberg, 2014

DEADPOOL appeared in the animated film HULK VS. WOLVERINE and later in Ultimate Spider-Man, amongst others. He also had his own best-selling video game, where he continued to take shape, while still barraging the pages of Marvel comics in a series of solo and team-up books, including guest appearances galore, solidifying him as one of the most popular modern-era comic book characters. Hollywood took some notice and decided it was time to make his big screen push, which would be in X-MEN ORIGINS: WOLVERINE. Unfortunately, that push would be a miscalculated one, leaving DEADPOOL in less than stellar hands and presumably killing the hopes of seeing him pop up properly in future X-films, let alone a solo venture.

However, something amazing happened in the wake of ORIGINS, and it wasn’t any one single thing that helped resurrect the character (in film anyway, as the comics didn't really feel that impact) and lead him to a record-breaking box office in a solo film. From individual passion, creator and fan-led rallying, a firm grasp on the character, studio support, some brilliant marketing and, finally, a slam-dunk film, there were a combination of factors that helped make DEADPOOL the phenomenon that everyone’s talking about. While Hollywood tries to unravel the mysteries of it's success, I think a lot of it is written on the wall, but here's my breakdown nonetheless:

Passion

Ryan Reynolds chased this property for years, immediately identifying with the character and taking ownership of it. Like Hugh Jackman to Wolverine or Robert Downey Jr. to Iron Man, Reynolds fully embraced Wade Wilson, respecting his comic lineage and in turn infusing his own blend of humor and personality into that personage. Hiring Tim Miller to work on the film brought equal passion, along with Reese and Wernick on script duties, both of whom were passionate about what they put to page, trumpeting it as the best thing they’d ever written. Coupled with the support of Deadpool creator Rob Liefeld, who stayed the course in promoting the character and those involved with bringing him to the big screen, the team kept the fires burning against all odds to make DEADPOOL a reality. In the Hollywood game where projects can quickly be written and put into production in a matter of months, DEADPOOL was a torch carried through mud and rain over several years before finally lighting the home fire.

Timing

While we can argue day and night about whether it was Donner's SUPERMAN, Burton's BATMAN, or Singer's X-MEN that helped launch the current comic book movie craze, there's no denying that it's been an up and down journey. We've seen some really phenomenal films from the genre in the last few decades, but it's hard to say whether or not we could've handled them all at once. For fans it's an easier sell, but for general audiences it took some doing. Helped largely by the MCU's slate of films and Christopher Nolan's DARK KNIGHT trilogy, today's audiences are much more keen on comic book films and are much more willing to accept something "new and different" where they might not have been before (I'd even go so far as to argue that Zack Snyder's WATCHMEN would perform better today than in 2009, but that also shows that sometimes you can do everything right and still not connect). There's the myth of superhero fatigue setting in, but in reality they've never been more popular. It ends up being a case of audiences being more accepting of something like DEADPOOL, rather than needing a "savior" to spice things up. It simply hit at a time when everyone was ready for it, rather than a time when it was too much, too soon or too little, too late.

"I just think there’s nothing else that occupies a space quite like it in any universe, in any comic book universe, and it’s been like that for a long time, um, so in a weird way waiting might have served us better than anything, because now’s the time for a movie like this in a way that, y’know, five, six, seven years ago might not have been." - Ryan Reynolds, Deadpool set visit, 2015

Fan Support

This is probably the most overlooked aspect of DEADPOOL’s success. Not only the fans who have been buying the comics for decades, but the fans who have furthered the character’s success in other venues, including TV, animation, and, most importantly, in toys, collectibles and apparel. From action figures to posters to coffee mugs to beanies to hoodies to LEGOs and beyond, DEADPOOL has been at the forefront. Although it’s likely that your local comic book shop has all their DEADPOOL merchandise front and center today, you can bet your ass that they had all of that stuff up years ago as well (now it’s just all at the front of the shop for new fans entering comic book Valhalla for the first time).  DEADPOOL resonated with fans, standing as the badass we all want to be in his boasting red costume and awesome weaponry (not to mention that mutant healing factor), yet underneath was a confused, scarred, and conflicted character. DEADPOOL is very much a metaphor for the comic-reading audience, a metaphor that has certainly helped seal his fame amongst them.

"They [the fans] own it. And I don’t mean that as anything falsely sincere. Genuinely I feel like we owe this experience to them. It’s like, y’know, never in a million years would it have happened this way had it not been for their voice.  And, social media in every aspect, y’know? People were writing Fox. It’s kinda nice, y’know? I feel like we owe it to them to give them the most authentic Deadpool possible and at the same time we also feel indebted to them for getting this movie made. They greenlit it, really. Fox just dated it." - Ryan Reynolds, Deadpool set visit 2015

Knowing The Product

This is one of the most essential aspects of making a faithful adaptation and fans have been burned at the "theater stake" one too many times as a result of a piss poor translation and lazy execution. Ironically, the latest example of that comes from Fox with last year’s FANTASTIC FOUR, a film that had a major identity crisis with no clear understanding of where it came from or what made the source material so special. We already saw DEADPOOL go down this same road in X-MEN ORIGINS: WOLVERINE, but thankfully the studio got the right passionate people to guide the Wade Wilson ship, knowing full well where he came from, what made him special, what was essential to be on the big screen, and ultimately, how to present him. This is basic “know your product” shit and for DEADPOOL’s solo outing it was spot on. It's a credit to Fox for not only knowing what they had on their hands, but trusting the people they hired to bring it home.

Marketing

I have simply never seen a film marketed better than DEADPOOL. They started early, getting their hooks in from the start. Whoever leaked that test footage kicked off a catalyst of marketing brilliance that topped itself again and again. From the clever R-rating reveal (which we debuted on this site) to the various viral videos, images, emojis, script pages, posters, etc., DEADPOOL covered the gamut and did so with FULL integrity. That’s an essential aspect to the marketing as well, because at no time did DEADPOOL try to sell itself as anything other than what it was; an R-rated superhero film that was more than a little crazy, over-the-top, violent, and funny. It knew what it was from the start (see: knowing your product) and sold it exactly as it was, right down to DMX’s “X Gon’ Give it to ya”.

The Finished Film

This is where it all comes together and, judging by those box office receipts, did it ever. None of the passion, players, fans, or marketing mean anything if the film doesn’t deliver and to everyone’s credit (including the studio, which is famously knocked for doing the opposite of what DEADPOOL did) everything came together and then some.  While there are a handful of folks that didn’t like it (none of whom are invited to any of my future parties), the majority of folks loved it and will no doubt go back for repeat viewings. By simply allowing this film to be made the way it was made and released as such, new audiences and fans alike were treated to a film that, in rare form for a non MCU property, adapted the source material like a champ and with nary a compromise.  We got the film that we deserved, not a bastardized version of something that was misunderstood, misinterpreted, and desaturated to appeal to a wider audience. In this sense, the opposite worked.

Now, with all that success in the can and DEADPOOL firmly established as a true comic book film contender, everyone in Hollywood is opening up that playbook to see how they can replicate it. However, rushing to fill that gap isn’t as easy as leaking test footage, slapping in an R-rating, and creating an immersive marketing campaign. It’s a deeper connection that starts with a character that audiences will love and connect with, a group of talented people that understand and have passion for said character, a studio that supports not only the passion of those involved, but also the integrity of the property, and finally, a genuine understanding of what they have and how to present it. In the end, all of those elements are what made DEADPOOL a success. It wasn’t a fluke or a shot in the dark; it’s kind of the prime example of what happens when everything comes together in a near idealistic state to make a film that captures exactly what it set out to do in the beginning.

Unfortunately, a broader problem that DEADPOOL could cause with studios misinterpreting its success (and I'm sure there are meetings at Marvel and WB this week discussing it) is that the influence of its tone, comedic elements, and R-rating could end up being a factor that's considered for every film going forward. Here's the deal, though: Not every comic book character is funny. Or crazy. Or like DEADPOOL. In fact, few are. Likewise, not every comic film needs an R-rating to push the envelope. Really, most don't. So, if WB ends up having meetings to see how they can make Batman or Superman funny (of which they are not) or if the MCU is adversely influenced to make something like, say, CAPTAIN MARVEL, a hard-R cosmic tale, then they've missed the point of what made DEADPOOL a success to begin with (to note, I think Marvel has a pretty firm grasp of how to handle their properties, as they've consistently proven to know their properties).

Batman's not funny. That's not what you think of when you think of Batman. Or Superman. Or Aquaman or Doctor Strange, etc. And we certainly don't need an R-rated Spider-Man or The Flash. Sure, some of them may have some comedic elements or darker tones from time to time, but to force those elements is to misunderstand their own products and, essentially, what made DEADPOOL a hit to begin with. GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY director James Gunn, who took his own risks in bringing that film to a successful bow, had something similar to say in a longer post on his Facebook page, which was in response to a non-Fox studio exec being quoted saying exactly what you'd predict about DEADPOOL's success. Gunn's response is right in line with my thinking, saying (in part):

"For the theatrical experience to survive, spectacle films need to expand their definition of what they can be. They need to be unique and true voices of the filmmakers behind them. They can't just be copying what came before them." - James Gunn, Facebook

I couldn't agree more. So, before Hollywood starts thumbing through comics to find the “next Deadpool” or property closest to it and push it out of the movie womb prematurely, I can only hope that instead of trying to capitalize on the success of DEADPOOL as quickly as possible, they’ll look at what really made it a success to begin with. Failing to do so will make DEADPOOL look like a fluke, when it really isn’t. It’s simply what happens when you’re really paying attention to what you have, rather than trying to create something you don’t. Let’s not make audiences suffer from a knee-jerk reaction to replicate success, but rather reward them (and in turn, reward Hollywood) by heeding the lessons of why it made such a splash.

CLICK IMAGE TO OPEN GALLERY & SEE MORE PICS...

Source: JoBlo.com

RECOMMENDED MOVIE NEWS

MORE FUN FROM AROUND THE WEB

Strikeback
Not registered? Sign-up!
Or

2:25AM on 02/17/2016
I really enjoyed the movie. It was the right mixture for what you'd expect from such movie. Now you know - if you want to watch intense action with funny moments and some kind of plot - you go and watch Deadpool.
I really enjoyed the movie. It was the right mixture for what you'd expect from such movie. Now you know - if you want to watch intense action with funny moments and some kind of plot - you go and watch Deadpool.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
+0
6:41PM on 02/16/2016

Didn't James Gunn do this already?

Also the Deadpool video game was a HUGE flop, not best selling.
Also the Deadpool video game was a HUGE flop, not best selling.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
6:33PM on 02/16/2016

Great article...

Really liked this specific article in C'mon Hollywood...it was well thought out.

Something tells me we will be hearing about Lobo again soon...
Really liked this specific article in C'mon Hollywood...it was well thought out.

Something tells me we will be hearing about Lobo again soon...
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
5:56PM on 02/16/2016
Haven't seen it yet but will do
I think one thing they've overlooked in how they also got this right is cost?? Look how many times we as fans get our hopes built up over subjects being brought to the big screen only for them to be considered duds and bombs partly based on their failure to collect decent revenue, thank god someone looked at this and said 'hey we don't need to chuck loads of money at this for it to work' Genuinely wish actors and studios would consider this more - look at the
Haven't seen it yet but will do
I think one thing they've overlooked in how they also got this right is cost?? Look how many times we as fans get our hopes built up over subjects being brought to the big screen only for them to be considered duds and bombs partly based on their failure to collect decent revenue, thank god someone looked at this and said 'hey we don't need to chuck loads of money at this for it to work' Genuinely wish actors and studios would consider this more - look at the Lone Ranger budget, John Carter budget, as much as I love Marvel but seriously RDJ $40 million to make a movie? Does anyone need that kind of money. To me actors would do more to accept lower fees and perhaps do things like ask for a share in the profits like Alec Guiness did, this way they might be more invested in the end product - on that note I hope Reynolds took a reduced fee in return for a cut of the profits cos well done him for actively campaigning and using his influence to get this made
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
+0
5:21PM on 02/16/2016
The only character that comes to mind thats a Deadpool kind of insane, is Deaths Head II. But hes pretty obscure. Maybe they should revisit Judge Dredd.
The only character that comes to mind thats a Deadpool kind of insane, is Deaths Head II. But hes pretty obscure. Maybe they should revisit Judge Dredd.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
2:09PM on 02/16/2016
1) Correction: Deadpool made over $150million in the four day weekend.

2) Deadpool was great because the filmmakers respected and cared for the source material. Egos didn't try to reinvent anything, they stayed true to everything that made the comics so much fun.

3) The marketing for this movie was perfect. It honestly sold us exactly what this movie was, which is rare. No bait and switch, no trying to make it look like another successful movie. They were honest with what it was.
1) Correction: Deadpool made over $150million in the four day weekend.

2) Deadpool was great because the filmmakers respected and cared for the source material. Egos didn't try to reinvent anything, they stayed true to everything that made the comics so much fun.

3) The marketing for this movie was perfect. It honestly sold us exactly what this movie was, which is rare. No bait and switch, no trying to make it look like another successful movie. They were honest with what it was.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
2:27PM on 02/16/2016
1) That's estimated. Again, as I stated "more than $135 million domestically in a 4-day period". Final numbers are still fluctuating.
1) That's estimated. Again, as I stated "more than $135 million domestically in a 4-day period". Final numbers are still fluctuating.
2:05PM on 02/16/2016

Saw it twice

Absolutely loved Deadpool, but it concerns me that other studios are interpreting an R-rating as an indicator that they need to make more adult rated superheroes when in reality, they just need to be more creative with their ideas instead of just replicating the tone. I'm excited with what this means for future Fox films, but I doubt Disney/Marvel will suddenly change what has been working for them for the longest time. However, I wouldn't be surprised if DC decided to make Suicide Squad
Absolutely loved Deadpool, but it concerns me that other studios are interpreting an R-rating as an indicator that they need to make more adult rated superheroes when in reality, they just need to be more creative with their ideas instead of just replicating the tone. I'm excited with what this means for future Fox films, but I doubt Disney/Marvel will suddenly change what has been working for them for the longest time. However, I wouldn't be surprised if DC decided to make Suicide Squad rated-R.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
1:55PM on 02/16/2016
Looks like this got the ball rolling as Wolverine is getting targeted for an R-rating [link]
Looks like this got the ball rolling as Wolverine is getting targeted for an R-rating [link]
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
2:00PM on 02/16/2016
If there's a film that could desperately use an R-rating it's Wolverine. Not so much for darker themes or nudity or language...but just to see Wolverine truly slice and dice some bad guys in a Paul Verhoeven inspired bloodbath, much like he does in the comics. If you cut someone with three sharp blades all at once there's going to be a preponderance of blood, whether you're in a comic book universe or not. For that alone, I think Wolverine deserves an R.
If there's a film that could desperately use an R-rating it's Wolverine. Not so much for darker themes or nudity or language...but just to see Wolverine truly slice and dice some bad guys in a Paul Verhoeven inspired bloodbath, much like he does in the comics. If you cut someone with three sharp blades all at once there's going to be a preponderance of blood, whether you're in a comic book universe or not. For that alone, I think Wolverine deserves an R.
2:09PM on 02/16/2016
I agree. I've always said this. If you want a toned down Wolverine, you have 4 X-men movies and 2 solo movies that are PG13, at least give us one R rated Wolverine flick
I agree. I've always said this. If you want a toned down Wolverine, you have 4 X-men movies and 2 solo movies that are PG13, at least give us one R rated Wolverine flick
+0
1:52PM on 02/16/2016
"CBM"? Is that Comic book movies?
"CBM"? Is that Comic book movies?
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
1:40PM on 02/16/2016

Amazing points. Just one minor nitpick.

"because at no time did DEADPOOL try to sell itself as anything other than what it was"

What about those Nicholas Sparks billboards? ;)
"because at no time did DEADPOOL try to sell itself as anything other than what it was"

What about those Nicholas Sparks billboards? ;)
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
1:57PM on 02/16/2016
Touche! Although that's all part of Deadpool's shtick. I was really surprised at how much heart the film had, honestly. I fully expected it to never take itself seriously. A welcome surprise.
Touche! Although that's all part of Deadpool's shtick. I was really surprised at how much heart the film had, honestly. I fully expected it to never take itself seriously. A welcome surprise.
1:29PM on 02/16/2016
I still doubt that the R-rating is what people are going to take away from this. Deadpool's not a hero, he's a kill-happy mercenary with a foul mouth. To do that right they went low-budget (for a super-hero movie) and R-rated. And they pulled out the stops for the marketing.

What hopefully they will take away from this is, tell stories that are about the characters, not about us. You look at Sam Raimi's Spider-Man movies and they are about a web-slinger dealing with trying to be a hero for
I still doubt that the R-rating is what people are going to take away from this. Deadpool's not a hero, he's a kill-happy mercenary with a foul mouth. To do that right they went low-budget (for a super-hero movie) and R-rated. And they pulled out the stops for the marketing.

What hopefully they will take away from this is, tell stories that are about the characters, not about us. You look at Sam Raimi's Spider-Man movies and they are about a web-slinger dealing with trying to be a hero for the people. Nolan's Batflicks were more about the people when a man decides to be their hero. My two favorite Marvel movies are Iron Man and Guardians of the Galaxy, because they both marked a shift in the narrative. Iron Man is Batman with a sense of humor and selfish motives. GOTG were a bunch of misfits, not unlike Deadpool, who were send-ups of what we were used to seeing from Marvel.

What we're ready for now are people who aren't just heroes. It's like when Colossus starts monologuing about four or five moments. I defy anyone in the audience to not be rooting for Deadpool to just blow the guys brains out. And you think about it, now is the perfect time for Marvel to be introducing The Punisher. A different kind of (anti)hero. More human. There are properties that just haven't seen the light of day in movies because they are too risky. Give 'em their moment and see if it works.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
1:02PM on 02/16/2016

Been waiting for this for years

I love the Avengers and the pg-13 universe they've created but I do get bored of them churching it up, family friendly it up so much i could take my 4 year old nephew if i wanted. They did that with Die Hard and the Terminator franchise and now I would say they're no more dramatic or better than the Maze Runner or Hunger Game franchise. I remember my mom telling me I had to wait till I was older to watch certain movies now John McClane and Sarah Conner could fight crime on ABC without having to
I love the Avengers and the pg-13 universe they've created but I do get bored of them churching it up, family friendly it up so much i could take my 4 year old nephew if i wanted. They did that with Die Hard and the Terminator franchise and now I would say they're no more dramatic or better than the Maze Runner or Hunger Game franchise. I remember my mom telling me I had to wait till I was older to watch certain movies now John McClane and Sarah Conner could fight crime on ABC without having to be censored.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
11:28AM on 02/16/2016

Loved the movie, but I honestly believed it would underperform...

I was proven dead wrong. There have been examples in the past of movies generating internet hype and then coming up short in the box office category, this was not one of those. Who knew a movie like this could outperform many of Marvel Studios best openings? As much as I typically hate Fox execs in the super hero genre, they nailed this one by simply staying away, what a concept.
I was proven dead wrong. There have been examples in the past of movies generating internet hype and then coming up short in the box office category, this was not one of those. Who knew a movie like this could outperform many of Marvel Studios best openings? As much as I typically hate Fox execs in the super hero genre, they nailed this one by simply staying away, what a concept.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
12:35PM on 02/16/2016
I felt the same way. I thought that internet hype wouldn't equate to box office and we'd have another Snakes on a Plane. I'm so glad to be wrong, and that this was a really good, mostly faithful adaptation. I loved it.
I felt the same way. I thought that internet hype wouldn't equate to box office and we'd have another Snakes on a Plane. I'm so glad to be wrong, and that this was a really good, mostly faithful adaptation. I loved it.
11:11AM on 02/16/2016
Timing (and marketing is everything.. If Deadpool had come out a few years ago it may not have worked as well. Audiences need to be familiar with superheros befor5e they can really enjoy a satire on them. Hopefully the major companies will look at doing characters that need an R rating to work properly rather than lets do an R rated film with a random picked character. Only one that comes to mind right off is DC's original take on Lobo but likely there are others.
Timing (and marketing is everything.. If Deadpool had come out a few years ago it may not have worked as well. Audiences need to be familiar with superheros befor5e they can really enjoy a satire on them. Hopefully the major companies will look at doing characters that need an R rating to work properly rather than lets do an R rated film with a random picked character. Only one that comes to mind right off is DC's original take on Lobo but likely there are others.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
10:59AM on 02/16/2016
Getting the core fans happy is essential, if that's achieved, I think you'll just bring in more and more new fans. I went to see it with the wife and thought she wouldn't enjoy it after the first hour. Boy was I wrong, she really enjoyed it, thought it was hilarious and liked the fourth wall element of it.
Getting the core fans happy is essential, if that's achieved, I think you'll just bring in more and more new fans. I went to see it with the wife and thought she wouldn't enjoy it after the first hour. Boy was I wrong, she really enjoyed it, thought it was hilarious and liked the fourth wall element of it.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
10:46AM on 02/16/2016
One of the reasons why the film was so successful and great was because it changed formula from your standard comic book film. The film wasn't afraid to embrace its comic book roots and the explicit humor and violence that comes with Deadpool. And the fact that it's an extremely funny film doesn't hurt either with surprisingly a lot of heart. I was taken back by how delicately and well told the film focused on Wade and Vanessa's relationship from the beginning and actually made you care for
One of the reasons why the film was so successful and great was because it changed formula from your standard comic book film. The film wasn't afraid to embrace its comic book roots and the explicit humor and violence that comes with Deadpool. And the fact that it's an extremely funny film doesn't hurt either with surprisingly a lot of heart. I was taken back by how delicately and well told the film focused on Wade and Vanessa's relationship from the beginning and actually made you care for them throughout the entire film.

I just thought it did a great job of balancing the humor with the extreme violence while still being grounded at the same time in terms of Wade's motivations and actions in being who he is and who he became and why.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
10:41AM on 02/16/2016
I'm pretty sure Deadpool is now an ideal case study on how to make a good super hero movie. However, this will also mean many studio will try to make superhero movie about superhero that is unknown / less popular to the public. Deadpool was a risk for Fox but I'm glad Fox decided to embrace the risk and now it's paying off huge. It's great to see huge movie studios listen to the fans for once.
I'm pretty sure Deadpool is now an ideal case study on how to make a good super hero movie. However, this will also mean many studio will try to make superhero movie about superhero that is unknown / less popular to the public. Deadpool was a risk for Fox but I'm glad Fox decided to embrace the risk and now it's paying off huge. It's great to see huge movie studios listen to the fans for once.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
View All Comments

Latest Entertainment News Headlines


Top
Loading...

Featured Youtube Videos

Views and Counting

Movie Hottie Of The Week

More