Latest Entertainment News Headlines

George Miller talks Mad Max, Stanley Kubrick, Justice League, and more

02.03.2016

After a long hiatus, the world of MAD MAX was once again brought to life by director George Miller; MAD MAX: FURY ROAD was one of the best films of 2015 and its success has left many fans hoping that it wouldn't take quite so long to get a sequel off the ground. George Miller recently sat down with THR for their interview series The Hollywood Masters, where they discussed everything from MAD MAX: FURY ROAD to late night telephone conversations with the late Stanley Kubrick. It's an extremely worthwhile read if you've got some time to kill, but I've gathered up some of the more interesting tidbits below.

The music of MAD MAX: FURY ROAD was one of its many highlights, but George Miller initially didn't want to have any music in the film beyond the Doof Warrior and the drummers.

Initially, believe it or not, I didn’t want to have music. I thought the guitarist, the Doof Warrior and the drummers and the sound of the vehicles would be enough of a soundscape to basically tell the story. And then there would be music, once the characters started to find some affiliation, particularly Max and Furiosa, and Max in particular was more humanized. I thought we'd bring in some musical element. And so it’s a great opportunity, this movie, for sound. And there was a lot of work in that regard.

Then someone at Warner Bros. brought in some music that Junkie XL had written and Miller was very impressed, saying "he's extraordinary. He can write any kind of music when tasked to do it. He can write beautiful, lyrical music and long progressions of intense, intense action." In addition to the very important role that music played in MAD MAX: FURY ROAD, Miller also discovered during test screenings that even the smallest sounds can have a big impact:

At the end of that chase we just saw, in the test screenings I thought there was a tendency for the audience to applaud, and then the applause would fall away. And then you see that there’s a shot of Max as he wakes up out of the sand. It holds for a very long time. And I thought, why are they not applauding, continuing with applause, which is a lovely thing to have in the cinema? And I realized it didn’t become completely silent. There was a little sound, little, sustained, droning sounds that had continued right through into the next scene. So that caught the audience’s ear and it led to an expectation of something else about to happen, rather than we were coming to a full stop. And by making it completely silent, with not one bit of sound, it sort of gave permission for the audience to applaud. And that was really interesting to me. I didn’t think a sound I could barely hear influenced the way that the audience would respond to them.

MAD MAX: FURY ROAD went through its fair share of setbacks and delays, but as we know, it all worked out in the end. One project which wasn't so lucky was George Miller's JUSTICE LEAGUE film, which would have starred D. J. Cotrona as Superman, Armie Hammer as Batman, and Megan Gale as Wonder Woman.

That was, oh, seven years ago, I think. And there was a really great script. And Warners said, “Let's do it. Let's do a Justice League.” I really was attracted to it. But there was a writers strike looming. We had to cast it very quickly, which we did with Warner's casting people. And we cast it really quickly and we mounted it very quickly. And it depended on a start date and it depended on some basic rebate legislation that had just got through a new Australian government. But it was just too big a decision for them to make in the time. And that fell through and the whole film fell through. We almost got there. And it wasn't to be. But that happens a lot, where films line up and the stars look like they're aligning and they didn't.

The late Stanley Kubrick has proved to be a great influence on many filmmakers, including George Miller, and although he never met Kubrick in person, Kubrick and he would have many lengthy telephone conversations during the production of BABE.

I explained we’re trying to make a pig talk. He was particularly caught up with the technology of not cutting on videotape. But he was one of those people who just kind of sucked in the world by conversations. Every night, we'd sit and talk for a long, long time and talk about the process and I knew he was very, very intrigued about what could be happening. Then of course, one of the fascinating things he told me about was how he had readers who were reading for him that never knew it was Stanley Kubrick. So if he heard of a novel, he would send it out to people. I think he did it through newspaper ads at the time. And he would send it out to people and ask for a kind of synopsis or a critique of the novel. And he would read those. And it was done anonymously. But he said there were housewives and there were barristers and all sorts of people doing that. And I thought, yeah, that's a really good way to open up the possibilities. Because otherwise, you're randomly looking [for material], walking through a bookstore or an airport.

George Miller's next film following MAD MAX: BEYOND THUNDERDOME was THE WITCHES OF EASTWICK starring Jack Nicholson. Unfortunately, making the film wasn't exactly a pleasant experience and Miller says that he only survived the "chaotic production" thanks to Nicholson's advice. During a production meeting there was a discussion on where they could trim the budget and Miller volunteered to give up his trailer, which led to a strained relationship with the producers who thought that “oh, this guy's negotiable on everything.” Hollywood, you're confusing.

I was always seen as being very polite. And they mistake politeness for weakness. That's what Jack told me. He said, “Be careful. They mistake your politeness for weakness.” And he said, “You've got to make them think you're a little bit crazy.”

CLICK IMAGE TO OPEN GALLERY & SEE MORE PICS...

Source: THR

RECOMMENDED MOVIE NEWS

MORE FUN FROM AROUND THE WEB

Strikeback
Not registered? Sign-up!
Or

9:18AM on 02/04/2016
What I loved about Fury Road was that it brought back the lost art of visual storytelling. All the greatest filmmakers of the past believed in one golden rule, "show us, don't tell us". Most movies now spit in the face of that logic. Most movies use pure exposition to explain overly complicated plots. Most filmmakers think that character development is backstory explained to us. Miller reminded us cinema is a visual format for storytelling. Fury Road told its story beautifully through pure
What I loved about Fury Road was that it brought back the lost art of visual storytelling. All the greatest filmmakers of the past believed in one golden rule, "show us, don't tell us". Most movies now spit in the face of that logic. Most movies use pure exposition to explain overly complicated plots. Most filmmakers think that character development is backstory explained to us. Miller reminded us cinema is a visual format for storytelling. Fury Road told its story beautifully through pure visuals. Most characters barely even spoke, yet they were fully developed as complex characters.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
10:20AM on 02/04/2016
Great comment!
Great comment!
8:33AM on 02/04/2016
Love the advice from Jack Nicholson - you can tell he lives by that credo a bit.
Love the advice from Jack Nicholson - you can tell he lives by that credo a bit.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
+0
5:55AM on 02/04/2016
I really dnt knw what pple really want.Say what you want,Fury Road is a spectacular movie,period.Not every movie has to be boyhood or whiplash for crying out loud.
I really dnt knw what pple really want.Say what you want,Fury Road is a spectacular movie,period.Not every movie has to be boyhood or whiplash for crying out loud.
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
10:19AM on 02/04/2016
No I think the overwhelming majority of ppl want fury road as is
No I think the overwhelming majority of ppl want fury road as is
1:19PM on 02/04/2016
That's exactly my point.some movies are what there are bcos of d uniqueness there posses.I dnt see any reason why i would desire something different frm d spectacle Miller gave us.
That's exactly my point.some movies are what there are bcos of d uniqueness there posses.I dnt see any reason why i would desire something different frm d spectacle Miller gave us.
+0
1:30AM on 02/04/2016

Little help please

Am I the only person who didn't really like fury road? Can you all help me with this? It's an amazing technical achievement, it's gorgeous, great action, and lots of other great stuff, but my main problem with the film can be summed up by the fact that the bad guys took the time to grab their guitarist, hook him up on the front of a car, and add pyrotechnics. That messed up a kind of realistic tone (more so than fast furious films at least - there's no real just super heros in that fury road,
Am I the only person who didn't really like fury road? Can you all help me with this? It's an amazing technical achievement, it's gorgeous, great action, and lots of other great stuff, but my main problem with the film can be summed up by the fact that the bad guys took the time to grab their guitarist, hook him up on the front of a car, and add pyrotechnics. That messed up a kind of realistic tone (more so than fast furious films at least - there's no real just super heros in that fury road, it's not cartoonish like some parts in the FF franchise, and I'm glad MM wasn't like that), and the film didn't have an over the top, humorous tone. It was just ridiculous. I don't dislike it, and it's certainly not bad, but it's nowhere near any of the best films of last year, for me. Can someone tell me if I missed something here?

With that said, I wish Miller would've made that JL movie, or wlll eventually
Your Reply:



Please email me when someone replies to my comment
11:15AM on 02/04/2016
i feel like a bit of the ridiculousness comes from most everyone in that world being a bit messed up, mentally, due to radiation or whatever it was, so the ridiculous is the realism in that setting.
i feel like a bit of the ridiculousness comes from most everyone in that world being a bit messed up, mentally, due to radiation or whatever it was, so the ridiculous is the realism in that setting.
7:16PM on 02/04/2016
What makes you think you missed something? That is what you felt for the movie, it's all relative. Don't think just because everyone liked it that there is something wrong with you. I kind of liked the guitarist and all, it added a bit of crazy on top of crazy. I don't think movies have to always be going for realistic, it's a movie, not real life. The great thing about movies is that they can go where ever they want. This whole "It needs to be real" trend has got to end. Why set so many
What makes you think you missed something? That is what you felt for the movie, it's all relative. Don't think just because everyone liked it that there is something wrong with you. I kind of liked the guitarist and all, it added a bit of crazy on top of crazy. I don't think movies have to always be going for realistic, it's a movie, not real life. The great thing about movies is that they can go where ever they want. This whole "It needs to be real" trend has got to end. Why set so many boundaries with realism? Use it when necessary is what i think.
12:31AM on 02/05/2016
I loved the movie, but I am more than a little shocked that it racked up this many nominations. Also, my dad, who introduced me to the world of Mad Max, couldn't get past the fact these guys were driving tricked-out gas-guzzlers in an oil-short wasteland. That shocked me even more, but it's his opinion.

But it's a fun, insane movie made with real skill and care for the story, such as it exists. Someone referred to it as pure cinematic storytelling. In that it wins in spades. But unless you
I loved the movie, but I am more than a little shocked that it racked up this many nominations. Also, my dad, who introduced me to the world of Mad Max, couldn't get past the fact these guys were driving tricked-out gas-guzzlers in an oil-short wasteland. That shocked me even more, but it's his opinion.

But it's a fun, insane movie made with real skill and care for the story, such as it exists. Someone referred to it as pure cinematic storytelling. In that it wins in spades. But unless you accept the madness of the world, the whole thing is pretty silly.
View All Comments

Latest Entertainment News Headlines


Top
Loading...

Featured Youtube Videos

Views and Counting

Movie Hottie Of The Week

More

Most Popular Upcoming

More