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Hi-Def Green Hornet

10.06.2008

If you're not familiar with the term '4K' in regards to filmmaking, you may want to get used to seeing it.

More and more productions will be taking advantage of the resolution boost, as theaters slowly upgrade to digital equipment that can display it. For clarification, the '4K' process means a movie is made in a whopping 4096 lines of horizontal resolution by 2304 vertical (hi-def digital movies such as the STAR WARS prequels were in HDTV-level 1920 by 1080).

Sony is planning a number of their major upcoming projects for the format (which naturally will utilize Sony's projectors), including the Angelina Jolie spy flick SALT (formerly EDWIN A. SALT), Roland Emmerich's disaster movie 2012, and Seth Rogen and Stephen Chow's GREEN HORNET, which is still early in development. But at least we know it'll look amazing whenever we get to see it.

For more on the format and the next-gen camera (called Red One), check out this Wired article.

Extra Tidbit: Sony's HANCOCK was released in '4K', which unfortunately didn't help the story. The upcoming 3-D remake of MY BLOODY VALENTINE also used the configuration.
Source: Coming Soon

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11:20AM on 10/07/2008

Coming around to digital

As a former projectionist myself, I totally sympathize with the desire to hold on to the film format. I, too, prefer the look of something that has been shot on film. Only a select few directors (one, really) know how to shoot a theatrical motion picture digitally. The rest (most notably Mel Gibson's "Apocalypto") don't know squat about it.

As far as projection goes. I love the crisp, clean look of a digitally projected movie, so I don't mind that. I do, however, get annoyed when Jimmy
As a former projectionist myself, I totally sympathize with the desire to hold on to the film format. I, too, prefer the look of something that has been shot on film. Only a select few directors (one, really) know how to shoot a theatrical motion picture digitally. The rest (most notably Mel Gibson's "Apocalypto") don't know squat about it.

As far as projection goes. I love the crisp, clean look of a digitally projected movie, so I don't mind that. I do, however, get annoyed when Jimmy Concession doesn't bother to check the sound and the image when a movie fires up. This is true of film, too, because I cannot tell you how many times I've been to the movies and the damn thing is out of frame.
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8:49AM on 10/07/2008
Another fan of film here, too. I still prefer the film look for movies, rather than the clinical look of digital.
Another fan of film here, too. I still prefer the film look for movies, rather than the clinical look of digital.
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8:14AM on 10/07/2008
I fucking hate digital.
Having said that I don't really care how it is screened. Since that makes no difference anyway.
Sure, film has an even higher resolution, but that's not the problem.
If a film is shot in film or digital. There's your difference.
The way it is screened in the theatre, makes no difference, except it has less "film scratches" and just looks "cleaner".
Anyway, sad thing is, even big Hollywood directors like David Fincher or Michael Mann don't get their films shot in
I fucking hate digital.
Having said that I don't really care how it is screened. Since that makes no difference anyway.
Sure, film has an even higher resolution, but that's not the problem.
If a film is shot in film or digital. There's your difference.
The way it is screened in the theatre, makes no difference, except it has less "film scratches" and just looks "cleaner".
Anyway, sad thing is, even big Hollywood directors like David Fincher or Michael Mann don't get their films shot in digital look fucking awful.
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6:15AM on 10/07/2008
35mm film delivers even higher resolution than 4k.
35mm film delivers even higher resolution than 4k.
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3:59AM on 10/07/2008

hmmmm

I've been on a shoot with the Red Cam and born witness to its results. It gives a better image then the Genesis but it still looks digital. It ain't no film. It's more like a camera that would be good for TV shows and Sci Fi Channel movies. Film is film and thats just the way it is.
I've been on a shoot with the Red Cam and born witness to its results. It gives a better image then the Genesis but it still looks digital. It ain't no film. It's more like a camera that would be good for TV shows and Sci Fi Channel movies. Film is film and thats just the way it is.
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3:56AM on 10/07/2008

amen to that Wombat

I totally agree.
I totally agree.
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2:40AM on 10/07/2008
Film will always be better.
Film will always be better.
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2:34AM on 10/07/2008

Harrumph

I think I'm one of the few people who actually prefers watching something on film. It's the reason why I frequently choose to go to smaller theaters. I used to work in a film theater and on countless occasions helped spool the film together as well as help break it down before we shipped it back. I can always tell when a film is being screened in digital and it tends to bring me out of the experience.

Also, projectors are a bit difficult to work with. They take a lot of time and care to
I think I'm one of the few people who actually prefers watching something on film. It's the reason why I frequently choose to go to smaller theaters. I used to work in a film theater and on countless occasions helped spool the film together as well as help break it down before we shipped it back. I can always tell when a film is being screened in digital and it tends to bring me out of the experience.

Also, projectors are a bit difficult to work with. They take a lot of time and care to keep them running efficiently. With digital projectors, they are at the point where basically anyone can run them without much training. This may sound like a good thing, but these people won't know what the hell to do when a projector malfunctions. One of the reasons I've stopped going to the Regal Cinema near me (which is all digital) is because in the past two years, about half of the movies I had seen there malfunctioned (mostly towards the beginning of the movie and the trailers, but there have been a few mid-movie breakdowns). I'd rather go to the family owned theater where the projectionist knows how to thread the machine and takes care of his projectors.

Sorry for the rant, I'm just not looking forward to this digital turnover.
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11:51PM on 10/06/2008

the funny thing is...

regular old film in most theaters is at a much, much higher resolution than digital film. It's more like 8k! It can be big as you want, and never lose it's detail. Digital will always artifacting.
regular old film in most theaters is at a much, much higher resolution than digital film. It's more like 8k! It can be big as you want, and never lose it's detail. Digital will always artifacting.
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