JOBLO'S MOVIE REVIEWS

SEARCH BY TITLE # A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
The Fountain (2006)
star Printer-Friendly version
Review Date: November 15, 2006
Director: Darren Aronofsky
Writer: Darren Aronofsky
Producers: Arnon Milchan, Iain Smith, Eric Watson
Actors:
Hugh Jackman as Tom
Rachel Weisz as Izzi
Ellen Burstyn as Lilian
Plot:
This movie is pretty hard to explain (especially for a half-wit as myself), but it basically takes place over three different time periods, 1500, 2000 and 2500, with the two lead characters essentially attempting to continue to love one another, despite war, illness and the finality of a little something called “death”. Do they make it? Not sure, but right about now, I wanna smoke a bowl!!
Critique:
I’m not one to do a lot of drugs, but about halfway through this movie, I was hoping that someone next to me would pass me a joint so that I could appreciate the film’s awesome visuals on yet another lofty level, while at the same time, delving even deeper into its timeless story. Granted, I wasn’t able to decipher its final act entirely in my first go-around, but I connected to much of the film nonetheless and heartily enjoyed it. It’s one of those movies that I can see myself watching over and over again…with or without the aid of external stimulants. The film looks absolutely splendid, the actors are all top-notch, the score and cinematography should win awards, and ultimately, the film’s message is a deep and life-affirming journey, with science-fiction, love and the fountain of life all joining the big-screen party. Sure, I wish it all would have crystallized perfectly for me in the end, but I won’t blame the film for that, since it’s obvious that it’s one of those movies that you really have to see a few times to really “get” all the way through (unless you’re smarter than me, which is highly likely). Or, better yet, smoke a little weed before you check it out and see what everyone was flipping out about when Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY was released back in the day. Which ever way you cut it though, this ain’t no cookie-cutter remake bullshit flick, it’s a unique and engaging journey, straight from the mind of writer/director Darren Aronofsky.

The film’s final 20 minutes or so feature some of the most stunning visuals that I have seen on the big screen in quite some time. I literally felt transported into this other world drenched in imagination, depth of purpose and a consciousness that was no longer just human. I really can’t wait to see this movie again, since unlike many films that have been churned out of Hollywood over the past few years, it actually tries something highly ambitious and on top of that, succeeds on almost every level. You gotta respect a filmmaker who is able to spend so much time on a project (it took Aronofsky about six years to complete this film) and ultimately deliver a result that should satisfy most anyone looking for an alternative in today’s movie marketplace. The film can easily be seen as a meditation on life itself, or better yet, an examination of what constitutes “true love” within the confines of our human lives on planet Earth, while at the same time, carrying with it three intertwining stories featuring developed characters who are obviously connected, driven and engaging to follow.

Is the film esoteric? Absolutely! I’m not gonna recommend that my “popcorn loving” parents check it out anytime soon, or that my 14-year old cousin who enjoys the Playstation drop coin on opening day, but if grappling with deeper life issues is part of your own constitution, if love in all of its facets, including fictionalized science, tickle your human curiosity and if you’re a massive fan of plush visuals, rousing musical scores and deep connections between two human beings, this film should be at the top of your list of “movies to see” this year, and certainly one to eventually purchase on dvd, so that you could buy some weed from your neighbor, shut the lights in your living room, slap a bag of Doritos next to you for “later” and allow yourself to be transported into a beautiful world created by the man who dares to shoot for the stars himself: Darren Aronofsky. And how cool is it that he actually met his future wife on the set of this timeless love story? (actress Rachel Weisz) Kudos, sir…major kudos.
(c) 2017 Berge Garabedian
Strikeback
Not registered? Sign-up!
Or

1:06AM on 09/23/2009
Stunning, Ambitious, Amazing, Mind Blowing, & Heart Breaking.

All of those describe this classic sci-fi love story. Another awesome movie from Darren Aronofsky who continues to show his genius as a filmmaker.
Stunning, Ambitious, Amazing, Mind Blowing, & Heart Breaking.

All of those describe this classic sci-fi love story. Another awesome movie from Darren Aronofsky who continues to show his genius as a filmmaker.
Your Reply:



3:19AM on 07/10/2008
Man is this movie overrated. I never felt any real emotion for the characters and I feel the acting might be big reason why. It wasnt really good. It was also a crazily boring movie. The only reason I don't give it a 1 or a 2 is because of the pretty colors and the nice effects.
Man is this movie overrated. I never felt any real emotion for the characters and I feel the acting might be big reason why. It wasnt really good. It was also a crazily boring movie. The only reason I don't give it a 1 or a 2 is because of the pretty colors and the nice effects.
Your Reply:



12:01PM on 07/12/2007

Emporer. Clothes. You know the rest.

Pi and Requiem were fantastic, this was a 2 hour Guinness ad.
That movie was the biggest load of artistic masturbation I've seen in a long time and, again, I'm an Aranofsky fan.
All style, zero substance.
It got its message across that love is eternal in the first few minutes and then proceeded to beat you over the head with it for the next 2 hours.
Self-indulgent, solipsistic, arty-for-the-sake-of-it crap.
Yes it looked great but this... this….folly was about nothing!
Love Is Eternal
Pi and Requiem were fantastic, this was a 2 hour Guinness ad.
That movie was the biggest load of artistic masturbation I've seen in a long time and, again, I'm an Aranofsky fan.
All style, zero substance.
It got its message across that love is eternal in the first few minutes and then proceeded to beat you over the head with it for the next 2 hours.
Self-indulgent, solipsistic, arty-for-the-sake-of-it crap.
Yes it looked great but this... this….folly was about nothing!
Love Is Eternal repeated ad nauseum. And I mean nauseum.

Like getting clubbed to death with a hammer made of gaudy velvet.
Your Reply:



4:36PM on 03/10/2007
The most beautiful movie I've seen and a new favorite. Beatiful in visuals, in music, in Rachel Weisz and in morale (what an incredible message). I always appreciate giving a movie extra thought, but I would've liked the final act to be more understadable (although I'm pretty sure I get it fine now) since I'm going to be thinking about its message anyway.

This is a triumph for art itself.
The most beautiful movie I've seen and a new favorite. Beatiful in visuals, in music, in Rachel Weisz and in morale (what an incredible message). I always appreciate giving a movie extra thought, but I would've liked the final act to be more understadable (although I'm pretty sure I get it fine now) since I'm going to be thinking about its message anyway.

This is a triumph for art itself.
Your Reply:



10:31AM on 02/02/2007
"Exquisitely beautiful and almost unbearably sad... The Fountain is cinema as poetry; romance as revelation; science fiction as prayer." Amy Biancolli, Houston Chronicle

After the six year hiatus that followed his cult-smash, Requiem for a Dream, big things were expected of Darren Aronofsky’s latest philosophical paradigm, and The Fountain does not disappoint.

A spiritually charged, metaphysical love story, The Fountain spans 1,000 years as Tommy (Hugh Jackman) seeks the fabled Tree of
"Exquisitely beautiful and almost unbearably sad... The Fountain is cinema as poetry; romance as revelation; science fiction as prayer." Amy Biancolli, Houston Chronicle

After the six year hiatus that followed his cult-smash, Requiem for a Dream, big things were expected of Darren Aronofsky’s latest philosophical paradigm, and The Fountain does not disappoint.

A spiritually charged, metaphysical love story, The Fountain spans 1,000 years as Tommy (Hugh Jackman) seeks the fabled Tree of Life in his quest to save the woman he loves, Izzy (Rachel Weisz).

1500AD and Tomas is a Spanish Conquistidor battleing to save his Queen from the machinations of a maniacal Inquisitor.
Present day and Tommy is a neuro-surgeon desperately searching for a cure that will save his wife from the brain tumour that is killing her.
2500AD and Tom is an astronaut trying to convey his long dead wife, in the form of a tree (which he planted over her grave centuries before), into the heart of a dying star. A nebula from which she will be reborn.

If all of this sounds just a little confusing then don’t despair; The Fountain is an emotional journey rather than an intellectual one. Instead of trying to analyze and interpret the films numerous twists and turns, you need to allow the lyrical beauty of the film to wash over you and sink in.

Just as 2001 and Bladerunner redefined the genre, so The Fountain pushes the envelope as its deftly interwoven narrative leads you on a hauntingly spiritual and sacred quest for the elixir of immortality.

Aronofsky’s opus to “universal patterns, Biblical symbolism, and boundless love spread across one thousand years” has been described by some as visual poetry, and even those who feel the film to be flawed in its over sentimentality and lack of linear plotline are likely to concede that it is quite unlike anything else in mainstream cinema.

An achingly beautiful film to watch, for those who “get it” (and not everyone will), The Fountain is a mysterious and magical experience that will remain with you long after the final credits have rolled.
Your Reply:



7:22PM on 12/20/2006
I've been waiting all year to see this, and now that I have, I can say the wait was more than worth it. Darren Aronofsky serves up a visually spectacular and heartwrenching journey into love and death, one that I am not likely to soon forget (much like REQUIEM FOR A DREAM). Much of the film's success lies not only in its impeccable visuals, but also its' actors, both of whom are superb. I felt the chemistry between the two of them early on, and really found myself completely absorbed in the
I've been waiting all year to see this, and now that I have, I can say the wait was more than worth it. Darren Aronofsky serves up a visually spectacular and heartwrenching journey into love and death, one that I am not likely to soon forget (much like REQUIEM FOR A DREAM). Much of the film's success lies not only in its impeccable visuals, but also its' actors, both of whom are superb. I felt the chemistry between the two of them early on, and really found myself completely absorbed in the relationship between these two human beings. Hugh Jackman...wow. I can't remember ever seeing the man so emotionally vulnerable, and it works wonders. Rachel Weisz is beyond adorable, and gives a very touching performance as a woman facing death.

Like Joblo said, not everything makes perfect sense, though, and this isn't a perfect film, but it is by far my favorite of 2006. It's a breath of fresh air in a world of remakes, sequels, and other regurgitated crap that seems to be flying at us at ungodly speeds.
Your Reply:



12:27AM on 12/01/2006
It's a little hard deciding where to start with this movie. You've got the overall theme to the movie, the stunning visuals, the great acting, its production values, and hell, we'll throw in the f*cked up way it's presented.

The movie's basically about the search for immortality; it's presented in three different timelines: a doctor trying to medically save his tumor-stricken wife, a Spanish conquistador searching for the Tree of Life (as told of in Genesis), and a man travelling through
It's a little hard deciding where to start with this movie. You've got the overall theme to the movie, the stunning visuals, the great acting, its production values, and hell, we'll throw in the f*cked up way it's presented.

The movie's basically about the search for immortality; it's presented in three different timelines: a doctor trying to medically save his tumor-stricken wife, a Spanish conquistador searching for the Tree of Life (as told of in Genesis), and a man travelling through space in a globe heading toward a nebula and dying star. The male lead in all three stories is played by Hugh Jackman and the female lead is Rachel Weisz. It was pretty cool watching the three storylines interact with each other and it was pretty clear how the three related with each other. Or so I thought, while there were connections, the ending threw me for a loop and threw all the connections I thought existed away.

The movie's still a very thought-provoking ride and has several other things going for it other than its look into the impossible. For starters, the movie's visuals are spectacular, especially the scenes where Jackman's in the globe travelling through space. Aranofsky certainly has an eye for the spectacular and its evident during these scenes. The conquistador scenes are kind of claustrophobic with a lot of face close-ups or limited scenery, save for one scene with the conquistador and the queen - which is a pretty cool visual scene. The doctor and wife scenes bring out the emotional side of the movie and are probably the movie's best. Probably because they're the scenes we can relate to the most.

And Hugh Jackman's performance is the reason we can relate to them. He is superb in all the roles he plays, but particularly when he plays the doctor trying to save his wife's life. As the doctor, he's determined to the point of alienating his coworkers and even his wife, but he also shows he's a caring husband as well. As the conquistador, he's only interested in preserving the greatness of Spain and protecting his queen, maybe even to the point of insanity. Rachel Weisz didn't really have much to do except when she plays the dying wife; it's really Jackman's movie all the way.

It's definitely an interesting movie, but it's not perfect. It's a little confusing at times, particularly when it comes on how the three stories are connected and the extent to which they're connected. I think it's clear what Aranofsky is trying to present, but the way he presents it could be clearer. But he definitely created a visually exciting film and with Hugh Jackman delivering a great performance, it's a movie that's worth checking out, even though it's not a movie for everyone.
Your Reply:



JoBlo's T-Shirt Shoppe | support our site... Wear Our Gear!